2018 Racing Rumors

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3/24/2018 10:25 AM

killer1999 wrote:

New rear with old front

Scott planning a new rig? Not a surprise considering the age of the Gambler. Could be a 29er with the BOS Obsys up front

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3/24/2018 12:47 PM

Team Scott - LouzanPark


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3/24/2018 2:08 PM

That's a shame... Aesthetically, the Gambler was a standout. Now it looks like 17 other bikes. I guess it just goes to show how well a horst link 4-bar works since basically every other manufacturer is doing it now.

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3/24/2018 2:24 PM

I’m hoping Scott didn’t have to make a new bike due to the BOS product not fitting/working as that would be a huge oversight! All the photos or footage of Brendo up until now he was riding BOS forks but they still rocking Fox shocks ?

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3/24/2018 3:17 PM

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3/24/2018 4:11 PM



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3/24/2018 7:31 PM

peecee wrote:

I’m hoping Scott didn’t have to make a new bike due to the BOS product not fitting/working as that would be a huge oversight! All the photos or footage of Brendo up until now he was riding BOS forks but they still rocking Fox shocks ?

The fitting was not a problem for sure. I saw the "old" gambler with obsys and syors shock.

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3/25/2018 12:22 PM






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3/25/2018 12:32 PM

Subtenz wrote:




Having previously owned the Gambler, I am quite bummed out if they are changing the linkage to a horst link, the linkage assisted single pivot pulley design they had, has always been one of my favourites aesthetically. Plus it rides like a plough, which is sick.

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3/25/2018 1:05 PM

Kona Stinky is back ok Scott

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3/25/2018 2:06 PM

Fucking lame... FSR copy....

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3/25/2018 4:09 PM

killer1999 wrote:

New rear with old front

Such a shame! The Gambler is so unique. I always look for Fairclough's bike in the WC bike checks and I am always enamored

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3/25/2018 7:59 PM

New UCI rule. All teams must compete on a level playing field strictly aboard Four Bar FSR equipped bikes.

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3/25/2018 8:03 PM

Big Bird wrote:

New UCI rule. All teams must compete on a level playing field strictly aboard Four Bar FSR equipped bikes.

no vpp-style dual link? I'd say the field is split 50/50

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3/25/2018 10:12 PM

Given all the new horst link bikes, i'd say it's a matter of time when the split will become less of a split.

You have to remember all the fancy singlepivot and short dual link configurations are there just because of the FSR patent. Now that that's no longer active, you can also freely use horst link. And people are using it in droves, apparently.

There must be some reason for it...

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3/25/2018 11:21 PM

AdamO wrote:

The fitting was not a problem for sure. I saw the "old" gambler with obsys and syors shock.



Fox shock taped up ?

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3/26/2018 12:36 AM

Scott has been moving this way with the rest of their bikes for a while now. With the redesigns of the Spark and Genius it was probably just a matter of time.

This one's still a bit rough around the edges being mated to a stock Gambler front triangle, but it's cool to see a 'real' prototype getting race tested in full view.

**Interesting two-axis lower shock mount, I wonder if it is meant to minimize side loads on what appears to be a fairly long-stroke shock?

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3/26/2018 12:39 AM

peecee wrote:

I’m hoping Scott didn’t have to make a new bike due to the BOS product not fitting/working as that would be a huge oversight! All the photos or footage of Brendo up until now he was riding BOS forks but they still rocking Fox shocks ?

AdamO wrote:

The fitting was not a problem for sure. I saw the "old" gambler with obsys and syors shock.

peecee wrote:

Fox shock taped up ?

Exactly what I was thinking. Notice the Kashima coat on the shaft and the overall design of the shock. So indeed we can confirm that it's not "because of BOS" (just why? and after all, does the team really care if this improve the bike's performance?). Interesting thing however is the little piece added on the lower mount of the shock? Is it used to lighten the constraints applied on the shock lower (especially the shaft)?

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3/26/2018 12:44 AM

It's probably there to have the correct rocker design, needed for the desired suspension properties, without changing the front triangle design by raising the shock eyelet. It's easier to machine an extension piece.

Sure, the effective ETE does change, but it's probably a minimal change given how rough this prototype is. I wouldn't be surprised if the production frame lowers the chainstay pivot or raises it even more by using a pulley, like GT does.

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3/26/2018 2:05 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/26/2018 2:05 AM

Well mx is the closest thing to dh and pretty much all of them are using linkage activated single pivot suspension because after all those years of development people realized this is probably the best design for their needs.
Ofc dh and mx have different suspension requirements with pedaling efficiency probably being most noticeable but yeah, fsr seems to be taking the lead. There is still healthy competition though, all of dual links (vpp,dw,maestro,ks,...), sliders (yeti,polygon), and single pivots seem to be still quite interesting with high pivots but I'm pretty sure it will not die as long as Orange keeps making bikes :D

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3/26/2018 2:08 AM

Primoz wrote:

It's probably there to have the correct rocker design, needed for the desired suspension properties, without changing the front triangle design by raising the shock eyelet. It's easier to machine an extension piece.

Sure, the effective ETE does change, but it's probably a minimal change given how rough this prototype is. I wouldn't be surprised if the production frame lowers the chainstay pivot or raises it even more by using a pulley, like GT does.

That sure looks like test mule for a redesign of the suspension. I think they are just trying things that could improve the current platform. Maybe they will just stick to their current design if the tests are not concluding

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3/26/2018 7:39 AM

Doubt it. FSR gives you much more freedom in regards to the pivot placement, making frame design easier (you can adapt to certain other constrains), as long as you know what, you are doing (the suspension platform is easier to design with a single pivot, you have one optimal line of pivot placements and that's it). So you have pivots in a completely different position (for instance behind the BB, like Spec usually does) and still get the desired antisquat and chain growth characteristics.

Besides that any fourbar linkage is much more tunable in regards to braking feedback compared to a single pivot (not true for designs with floating brake mounts).

And as mentioned, the antisquat characteristics, desired from any bike, are completely different to desired characteristics of a motorcycle. Plus a single swingarm design can be made strong enough on a motorcycle since weight is not as big of an issue, single pivot linkage actuation designs are optimal from the packaging point of view (rocket placement under the seat and behind the engine/over the gearbox), etc.

Different requirements, different results.

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3/26/2018 11:51 AM

So Scott made a GT without an idler pulley?

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3/26/2018 11:54 AM

general lee wrote:

Scott has been moving this way with the rest of their bikes for a while now. With the redesigns of the Spark and Genius it was probably just a matter of time.

This one's still a bit rough around the edges being mated to a stock Gambler front triangle, but it's cool to see a 'real' prototype getting race tested in full view.

**Interesting two-axis lower shock mount, I wonder if it is meant to minimize side loads on what appears to be a fairly long-stroke shock?

maybe they just needed to be able to mount the lower eyelet higher up than the front triangle allows, due to where the rocker could attach and what they wanted out of the kinematics.

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3/26/2018 7:28 PM

meastman1 wrote:

So Scott made a GT without an idler pulley?

The GT has a higher lower pivot which requires the idler for proper pedaling. The Scott, like many other FSR designs has the lower pivot roughly in line with the chainring.

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3/26/2018 10:16 PM

It's not exactly low on the Scott either, wouldn't be surprised if it's maybe 5 mm lower or something small like that. The Gambler is known for a relatively high pivot point for an idler-less single pivot bike.

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3/27/2018 2:38 AM

Well i guess this yoke is there for one reason: Why did nobody see that they use a trunion mount shock (upper shock mount)? it's most probably a 225 x 75 or 225 x 70 shock wich is considerably shorter than a 241 x 76 and in order to compensate for the lost eye to eye length they put the yoke in there. Aswell it gives them the opportunity to play with the bb height and different shock configurations. seems like those trunion mount shocks open opportunities for different shock-placement wich can be quite interesting for an engineer.....

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3/27/2018 2:43 AM

Good point, I did miss that.

I think trunnion shocks are interesting since they facilitate very easy use of ball bearings in the frame or rocker mount of the shock, which then doesn't have any wear items like they did with bushings.

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3/27/2018 4:27 AM

Look closely with the two different photo where we see the complete bikes with the rider. In the first one with Gaetan Vigé the wheels looks clearly 27,5 but the second with Brendan, the wheels looks like 29 and they have no stickers on.

Also the bike in the van use a Bos shock and not a Fox with stickers on like the photo with Brendan's bike.

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3/27/2018 8:39 AM

Primoz wrote:

Good point, I did miss that.

I think trunnion shocks are interesting since they facilitate very easy use of ball bearings in the frame or rocker mount of the shock, which then doesn't have any wear items like they did with bushings.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BfuUIaGBpaE/?taken-by=vorsprungsuspension

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