FOX DPX2 or Float X2 rear shock

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11/14/2018 1:44 AM

I'm a big fan of twin tube damper shocks. Ever since I first rode a Cane Creek double barrel, they feel so different I just knew I'd never go back to the de carbon system I believe it's called.
Anyway so my current bike came with a Fox DPS shock, which is great most of the time, but I definitely want a twin tube on there, but I can't figure out whether to get a DPX2 or the full Float X2.
Has anyone tried both - on the same bike?
The difficult bit is that I use this one bike for everything (albeit with a couple of wheelsets) - Alpine road trips, loads of DH bike parks, long XC rides, Enduro races and the odd DH race. I live in the Peak District so a lot of XC.
So the bike and shock have a lot of work and have to be good at pretty much everything.

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11/14/2018 8:14 AM

Hi Tristan!

I tested both those shocks on the same bike for my review of the DPX2. Have a read and let me know if you still have any specific questions afterwards, and I'll try to answer them if I can.

-Johan

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11/14/2018 8:16 AM

The real question: What bike is that shock going on?

The Float X2 is a much more versatile shock, as it's designed for more abuse.
The DPX2 is the step down from the Float X2, it really was designed to fill the gap for riders like yourself.

With that said, the bigger can, oil flow, and general robust built of the Float X2 is preferable (in my opinion) if you are doing really long descents or racing. The extra weight is negligible if you want a single shock to do everything from an after-work-ride to a stage race.

Worth noting, the DPX2 has a regressive tune, meaning it has a falling rate built into the end stroke, the idea being it is less harsh on the end stroke - it ramps like air, but is mildly more linear than a non-regressive air tune.

My suggestion: get the Float X2, it's going to be fine for trail rides, and then shine and not hold you up for the big days.

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11/14/2018 8:31 AM

It's on a Nicolai G16.
Thanks for the replies, I'll read your review fully when I get home this evening Iceman

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11/14/2018 9:22 AM

Mmmmm many chin strokes....
I'm definitely starting to feel more like the full-fat X2 is probably the one. The lack of bottom out resistance that you both mention in the DPX2 is a concern. The G16 is slightly progressive, but not massively - the DPS I currently have does whack the bottom out occasionally.
Iceman, I have 2 questions about your write up please:
Firstly, what's the firm mode like on the X2?
Does it still leave the shock fairly active like the medium mode on the DPX2?
And secondly, please could you elaborate on the latter part of this paragraph you wrote:
"The X2 is first and foremost a gravity-oriented shock, a great match for big-hitting enduro bikes but not necessarily the first choice for those looking to improve the liveliness of their ride - that is where the DPX2 really shines."
So is the DPX2 more lively? Can you explain?

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11/14/2018 9:31 AM

Some answers:

"lack of bottom out support" - I wouldn't call it a lack, just that the end of the stroke is ever so slightly more "dramatic" in that you can feel the transition to the bottom out bumper a bit more markedly. There's plenty of ramp in the DPX2, and you can always throw in the biggest volume spacer for more.

The firm mode on the Float X2 is less firm than on the DPX2. It's still pretty active even when you close that lever.

As for liveliness, yes, the DPX2 felt a little bit more "poppy" on my test bike. Partially because it requires a bit more pressure to play nice with bigger features, but also due to the overall smaller air volume and the tune of the damping. It's a "Trail" shock so this is to be expected. The X2 doesn't lack in support, it just seems to want to stick to the trail much more, even when you load it up with tokens and run more damping.

As for your choice, I would also tend to gravitate towards the full-fat X2 over the half-and-half, skinny-latte DPX2. With the amount of park days you say you do, it seems like the best choice, and it offers enough tunability to make your long XC days completely manageable as well. Add 10 psi and a few clicks of LSC and LSR to quiet down any bobbing, and you'll be golden.

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11/14/2018 9:49 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/16/2018 8:19 AM

Removed, inaccurate.

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11/14/2018 10:03 AM

Mr. P wrote:

Removed, inaccurate.

On the contrary, the X2 had an EVOL airspring right from the start.

As for the spring curves, if anything, the X2 offers more control over the spring curve than most other shocks (large number of tokens), so it should adapt more easily to more frames.

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11/14/2018 11:01 AM

iceman2058 wrote:

Some answers:

"lack of bottom out support" - I wouldn't call it a lack, just that the end of the stroke is ever so slightly more "dramatic" in that you can feel the transition to the bottom out bumper a bit more markedly. There's plenty of ramp in the DPX2, and you can always throw in the biggest volume spacer for more.

The firm mode on the Float X2 is less firm than on the DPX2. It's still pretty active even when you close that lever.

As for liveliness, yes, the DPX2 felt a little bit more "poppy" on my test bike. Partially because it requires a bit more pressure to play nice with bigger features, but also due to the overall smaller air volume and the tune of the damping. It's a "Trail" shock so this is to be expected. The X2 doesn't lack in support, it just seems to want to stick to the trail much more, even when you load it up with tokens and run more damping.

As for your choice, I would also tend to gravitate towards the full-fat X2 over the half-and-half, skinny-latte DPX2. With the amount of park days you say you do, it seems like the best choice, and it offers enough tunability to make your long XC days completely manageable as well. Add 10 psi and a few clicks of LSC and LSR to quiet down any bobbing, and you'll be golden.

Firm mode on X2 depends on the year. 2017 shocks were almost locked in firm mode. 2018 as you described...

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11/14/2018 11:03 AM

I rode both of them on two different Frames and i feel like the Dpx is really a good shock for OEM Builds of Brands because its cheaper and works fine for most of riders. But personally if you ride rough stuff and fast ,especially a Lot of fast Hits in a short amount of time like Stones and brakebumps you should definitly consider the float X2. But If you ride a Lot of loamy single Trail and flow trails the Dpx would be as good as the float X2.

So the bottomline , get the float X2. It is Overall a better shock and has so many Tuning Options that a "livlier feel of the dpx" is totaly a thing of adjustment

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11/14/2018 12:14 PM

Iā€™d go for the X2 and look at tuning you dps for your xc side and run the horse for the course.

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11/14/2018 12:15 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/14/2018 12:15 PM

I've got a DPX2 on my Reign... Got an X2 on order.
It transformed the ride of my old Transition Patrol, which was already superb. I couldn't believe how much faster I felt comfortable going, after i fitted it.
Cannot wait to get one on my Reign

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11/14/2018 7:11 PM

TimBud wrote:

I've got a DPX2 on my Reign... Got an X2 on order.
It transformed the ride of my old Transition Patrol, which was already superb. I couldn't believe how much faster I felt comfortable going, after i fitted it.
Cannot wait to get one on my Reign

Hey man. Im currently on a patrol and am quite happy with my dpx2 but thinking about switching to x2. Sounds like you have confirmed my thoughts. My question is did you have any spacer difference between the two? I believe the dpx2 comes factory with only a .4 installed

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11/14/2018 7:54 PM

I put an X2 on my Trek Remedy and Banshee Prime. Both are significantly better as a result. I can't comment on the DPX2 but having had the choice both times I have no regrets buying the X2 on both occasions.

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11/15/2018 3:48 AM

Canecreek DB Coil iL with Valt spring weights almost the same as an X2.. sorry for hijack.. with that said, I havent been able to tune an x2 to have that poppy feeling of other good air shocks (dvo topaz), so yes in my opinion the X2s are closer to coil than to more trail oroented air shocks... but coil wins always anyways

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11/15/2018 3:51 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/15/2018 5:05 AM

duplicated

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11/15/2018 8:38 AM

The only problem with the X2 is you have to do full damper rebuilds in order to service the air sleeve

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11/15/2018 10:23 AM

kgmkgm wrote:

The only problem with the X2 is you have to do full damper rebuilds in order to service the air sleeve

That sounds like a problem, unless I'm missing something. Are people (non-racers) really going a year between air sleeve services? Regular (15 minutes and free) air can clean/lube makes a huge difference in how a shock feels, and I can do it in my garage w/out being off the bike for a week. I do about 2 of them between full annual rebuilds at a shop. I don't think many of my riding friends ever service their air cans, so maybe it's just me.

I've also got upgradeItis right now for my 2017 Patrol. Stock SuperDeluxe is due for full rebuild, so it's sent it to Avalanche for $250, get a coil, or get something like the X2. I'm leaning toward Avy - custom tune, cheaper, not as mainstream. But coil, mmmmmm.

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11/15/2018 12:53 PM

Tristan_Mayor wrote:

I'm a big fan of twin tube damper shocks. Ever since I first rode a Cane Creek double barrel, they feel so different I just knew I'd never go back to the de carbon system I believe it's called.
Anyway so my current bike came with a Fox DPS shock, which is great most of the time, but I definitely want a twin tube on there, but I can't figure out whether to get a DPX2 or the full Float X2.
Has anyone tried both - on the same bike?
The difficult bit is that I use this one bike for everything (albeit with a couple of wheelsets) - Alpine road trips, loads of DH bike parks, long XC rides, Enduro races and the odd DH race. I live in the Peak District so a lot of XC.
So the bike and shock have a lot of work and have to be good at pretty much everything.

Tristan,

Go with the FloatX2. Has more adjustability. Just follow the Factory setup guide and take your time tuning it correctly.

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11/15/2018 7:41 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/15/2018 7:42 PM

I ve had both on an Enduro 29. i Had the DPX2 on the new stumpy, and a switchblade
if you re riding trails 80% of the time, i d go DPX2 no question. pedaling platform is better, the propedal system and the tuning for reb and low speed comp are easy access, and easier to set up
i feel the X2 very planted to the ground, giving that 'flat tire' feeling. if you're ding long techy descents all the time and go in the bike park every weekend, then X2.

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11/15/2018 8:52 PM

Service is much easier on the DPX2 if you do any shock service yourself. Float X2 is much more robust which is nice for rough long runs and a season without constant serivce.

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#lancetigerblood

11/17/2018 9:47 AM

I don't know if this is bad form since the question is about twin tube shocks but if you have a chance to ride a DVO Topaz give it a try. I have tried the X2, DPX2, and the Topaz on the Firebird 29. I also only have one bike and the topaz was my choice because its right in between the two Fox shocks. It has a very tune-able air spring, it think it is smoother than either fox, can be rebuilt easily, has the three position lever for pedaling, and the customer service is top notch. They are all great so good luck on your decision and happy riding.

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11/18/2018 1:28 AM

luisgutrod wrote:

Canecreek DB Coil iL with Valt spring weights almost the same as an X2.. sorry for hijack.. with that said, I havent been able to tune an x2 to have that poppy feeling of other good air shocks (dvo topaz), so yes in my opinion the X2s are closer to coil than to more trail oroented air shocks... but coil wins always anyways

CCDB Coil IL is the worst coil shock I ever ridden. Immediately replaced by DHX2.

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