EWS Doping Thread Disappearance

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3/11/2019 9:53 AM

KMBNT wrote:

One thing to mention is that till the moment of Richie and Jared testing positive EWS was on a rapid rise with Sam switching to race proper courses, Martin showing that he soon will be the best gravity rider , increasing "awareness" of how gnarly the enduro racing has become, in stark contrast to perception of UCI DH and taking more and more from sponsorship pie.

With the Richie and Jared debacle I think the momentum will be lost. Regardless of what EWS does, it will lose and will lose badly, not only as a business/race series, but also as community/riders as well.

Fans seem to be split into to camps. One regards both Richie and Jared as crooks, which are to be banned for life, as Roskopp said in one of his very early interviews. No legal and PR (Pinkbike "interview" anyone) maneuvering from either EWS or both guys will convince them. The second group is trying to play down the situation and are 100% behind their heros. If EWS bans/suspends them former will be satisfied, but the latter will be seeing red... and vice versa.

To add insult to injury one of the top racers comes to social media and brags how he saw EWS top riders use all kind of strange substances in Colombia, but he didn't snitch on them... just started to train harder... You just can't make this s**t up. What was he trying to accomplish, besides scoring bro points with his fans?

This certainly will impact how EWS is perceived by sponsors and what share of the pie EWS and riders get. The question just is by how much it will shrink.

From what I see it seems that EWS will try to sweep it under the carpet. The change of "rules" to create loop holes, rumors that Richie will start the first round etc suggest that. Also the video of Richie overtaking Damian on a steep climb, which bares many similarities to Armstrong's performance vs. Ulrich, and was used by Jerome and others as a clue that Richie's performance was suspicious, got purged from youtube.

Personally I look forward to how Chris Ball is going to deal with fans heckling "Doped!" on stages. This will be rather entertaining :D




@ EBlackwell ad point 1.

I got prescribed Ventolin after coming out of a severe case of flue just before a week long bike trip... And I used it on a few rides after a long, heavy climb... this shit is a magic in a bottle, it's like having a new set of lungs just before the descent. Try it! You will understand why it's a banned substance :D might got hooked though


I missed this to quagmire of shit being vomited by others on here... but KMBNT well put and sums up the shit situation those twats have put the sport in!

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3/12/2019 8:13 AM

From the EWS to athletes via email this morning,



"I write to you as a member of the Enduro World Series (EWS) or a Team Manager of an Official EWS Team.
As we reach the final days before the 2019 season begins I’m acutely aware that the anti-doping case that hit the headlines in 2018 still remains a question for all of you. I therefore feel you deserve some information on the position of the EWS on this matter.

I am aware that there is anger and upset among the riders that the situation is not resolved. Although I understand your frustration, and your feelings too, this does not change the position of the EWS, which is bound by anti-doping regulations, legal due process and athlete rights.

The key aspect of this situation is that the EWS is 100% removed from all anti-doping cases. As it should be. We hosted the French Anti-Doping Agency (AFLD) to carry out their own tests in Olargues in 2018 and we will work with any findings they formally reach following those tests. But, the details of all open cases remain entirely confidential and between only two parties; the riders who were tested, and the agency that tested them. Therefore, we have as little insight and influence on the case as you do. This may seem strange, but it is correct, both ethically and legally and must be like this in order to maintain complete impartiality and neutrality during all anti-doping investigations in all sport, from the Olympics right down to EWS. We await a formal decision as much as you do. And we will not be able to determine any steps until that decision has been made, in this case by the AFLD.

We are increasingly asked if riders under investigation will be allowed to race in our series, and the answer is yes. Why? Because regardless of your or our personal opinions, the EWS makes all decisions based on fact and evidence and therefore until a formal decision is reached by the ruling party in the case, we have no official information to follow. It is by following due process, and treating all cases in the same way, that we maintain the sport’s legitimacy in the long term. We will never treat any case any differently to another. This is not showing any sympathy towards those in question, it is simply to maintain athlete rights and the high ethical standards we believe our sport deserves and each one of you would expect should you find yourselves in a similar situation.

While a case remains open and we have no notifications of any mandatory suspensions on any riders, the only way a rider will not take the start of an EWS is if they impose a voluntary ban on themselves. The EWS will respect any decisions reached by the parties in question until an official decision is made by the agency who carried out the tests.

We truly understand your upset and understand this is an emotive topic for us all, but during these times I ask only that both the riders under investigation, and all other riders in our sport respect each other, and, like the EWS, respect the formal processes in place.
Yours in sport,

Chris Ball"

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3/12/2019 12:44 PM

Wasn't it confirmed that they were positive? What is the case then?

If the EWS is removed from the matter, do they get a ban (if they do get a ban) for only French rounds? Or what?

This is all very confusing and a 'we wash our hands of this matter' kind of reaction. Not the best one i'd say.

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3/12/2019 1:17 PM

Primoz wrote:

Wasn't it confirmed that they were positive? What is the case then?

If the EWS is removed from the matter, do they get a ban (if they do get a ban) for only French rounds? Or what?

This is all very confusing and a 'we wash our hands of this matter' kind of reaction. Not the best one i'd say.

The EWS did not say they are "washing their hands of this matter." They said they are not part of the investigation. In any case of cheating, the EWS is as much a victim as the cheated athletes, therefore, it would be wrong for a victim to be an active part of the investigation.

They didn't say they won't do anything about this doping incident either, they said they will wait for the investigation to be completed before they make a decision, basing this on an athlete's right to due process. Due process is an intensive effort to find all pertinent facts of an incident and make a judgement based on those facts instead of emotions. Due process is the only true way to have justice. Any other way opens up the possibility of corruption, and therefore, negative impacts on the innocent.

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3/12/2019 1:37 PM

But isn't it normal for an athlete to receive a temporary ban for during the investigation, when he/she tests positive? I'm not that well versed in these things, but cmon, proven that you're positive and still be able to race? You're guilty and it's on you to prove that you're not (by giving a reason for allowed use or something along those lines), surely you shouldn't be allowed to race in the meantime??

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3/12/2019 1:47 PM

Primoz wrote:

But isn't it normal for an athlete to receive a temporary ban for during the investigation, when he/she tests positive? I'm not that well versed in these things, but cmon, proven that you're positive and still be able to race? You're guilty and it's on you to prove that you're not (by giving a reason for allowed use or something along those lines), surely you shouldn't be allowed to race in the meantime??

They tested positive for a 'specified substance', which means that they are allowed to race until a decision is made. It's the same situation that Chris Froome was in last year.
https://www.wada-ama.org/en/questions-answers/prohibited-list-qa#item-387

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3/12/2019 1:48 PM

Ah, that explains it. I take some of what i said back then.

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3/12/2019 2:42 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/12/2019 2:43 PM

According to Pinkbike Rude won’t be racing at the start of this season despite being able to race. FWIW.

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3/12/2019 5:02 PM

Hyperpower! wrote:

According to Pinkbike Rude won’t be racing at the start of this season despite being able to race. FWIW.

There is no better way for Rude to get the public back behind him than choose to not race until the investigation is finished and sanctions are made.

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@jason_gainey

3/13/2019 8:37 AM

The problem is that if he races any suspension would start effective with his last race... So, if WADA announced a 1 year suspension, it would start with the EWS finals last year..

But, at the pace WADA moves at, Richie could race and possibly be retired by the time a penalty is announced...

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3/13/2019 8:48 AM

Brian_Peterson wrote:

The problem is that if he races any suspension would start effective with his last race... So, if WADA announced a 1 year suspension, it would start with the EWS finals last year..

But, at the pace WADA moves at, Richie could race and possibly be retired by the time a penalty is announced...


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3/13/2019 8:56 AM

With the admission by both riders that they failed the drugs tests, EWS should have taken this and banned them from racing. This should be a life time ban and send the correct message. As it stands, they are saying it’s ok to use banned substances.

It says a lot about those that run the EWS. Weak as piss!

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3/13/2019 10:51 AM

Forked Tongue wrote:

With the admission by both riders that they failed the drugs tests, EWS should have taken this and banned them from racing. This should be a life time ban and send the correct message. As it stands, they are saying it’s ok to use banned substances.

It says a lot about those that run the EWS. Weak as piss!

I think this is the EWS politely saying "Shit or get off the pot.." WADA has a long history of people waiting for a penalty to be handed down.. 1 years, 2 years, lifetime... Whatever it is, stop stone walling these people so they can get on with their lives...

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3/13/2019 11:54 AM

Hyperpower! wrote:

According to Pinkbike Rude won’t be racing at the start of this season despite being able to race. FWIW.

It's strange that Pinkbike did not cite why Rude has oted not to race Rotorua. We don't know if it's because of the doping scandal or for some other reason.

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3/14/2019 7:03 AM

Brian_Peterson wrote:

The problem is that if he races any suspension would start effective with his last race... So, if WADA announced a 1 year suspension, it would start with the EWS finals last year..

But, at the pace WADA moves at, Richie could race and possibly be retired by the time a penalty is announced...

GA902 wrote:

EXACTLY - Look at Broc Tickle's case on the moto side. He tested positive at the San Diego supercross over a year ago ans STILL has not received a hearing date.

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3/14/2019 8:26 AM

scootch wrote:

EXACTLY - Look at Broc Tickle's case on the moto side. He tested positive at the San Diego supercross over a year ago ans STILL has not received a hearing date.

And Cade Clausson was even further back... And he had a TUE that he sent in... Yet, nobody at the FIM or WADA will respond...

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3/24/2019 10:00 AM

Not that the first EWS round is finished, any photos allowed from the doping control station or would the EWS ask that no photos be taken to avoid outing any potential cheats?

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3/24/2019 2:01 PM

rugbyred wrote:

Not that the first EWS round is finished, any photos allowed from the doping control station or would the EWS ask that no photos be taken to avoid outing any potential cheats?

Having your photo taken doesn’t imply guilt. Testing is normal in uci events.

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3/24/2019 2:04 PM

I think the catch here is that 'two athletes tested positive thing' with no names, but there was the picture of five guys being tested floating around. The speculation of who was positive started there.

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3/24/2019 2:39 PM

rugbyred wrote:

Not that the first EWS round is finished, any photos allowed from the doping control station or would the EWS ask that no photos be taken to avoid outing any potential cheats?

watchcwgo wrote:

Having your photo taken doesn’t imply guilt. Testing is normal in uci events.

I do realize that. It is as Primoz mentions.

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3/24/2019 11:22 PM

Ah I see I missed that thought. Testing is going to be a lot less taboo in enduro now though. I was trying to find good #’s but the best I could find is that in 2017, federations, organizations, and etc. that use accredited WADA labs conducted 1896 in competition urine or blood tests. This means the test was done while the racer was at the race. That # doesn’t specify disciplines, it was an umbrella mountain bike category, but up until now I’m sure it was mostly XCO, XCM, and DH.

Can anyone who was present at Rotorua comment as to the extent of UCI presence? I’d like to know how far in the uci is planning to go with this partnership. Will they just have one or two commissars at each race to make sure things are compliant or will it be more involved?

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3/25/2019 6:45 AM

If the plan is to have better governance against doping, what's needed are not just commissaires but also experienced doping control officers.

They have to be aware of UCI anti-doping regulations, CADF (Cycling Anti-Doping Foundation) procedures, and WADA international standards. Note that these are updated regularly as well.

This is, of course, in addition to the needed testing kits, equipment, et cetera.

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3/25/2019 11:53 AM

You're totally right about that, why I was wondering what the level of UCI presence or integration was this weekend. Most UCI races are also local federation races. With EWS, it's a little more confusing for me as to who does what. For example here in the US we have a local Enduro series, which have also been EWS races at various stops, but our national federation (USA Cycling) has no involvement in this series. The rulebook for this series doesn't list any doping verbage anywhere. This means that unless one of those two event organizers (big mountain enduro and EWS) hired outside doping controls, there was no reason for one to be there. Granted USADA, CADF, WADA, etc. could chose to have a rep at any race on their own grounds.

Another example is sea otter. There is various UCI races held there, requiring a UCI license. There is also UCI anti-doping in place. This event is also ran in conjunction with our national federation - USA Cycling, so there could be doping controls in place from either group. This is all spelled out in the technical guide for the event that has been available since January. http://www.seaotterclassic.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2019-XCO-HC-Technical-Guide-for-UCI-Elite-Men-and-Women-vJAN15.pdf page 5 lists anti doping info.

Looking through the EWS rules, you do need a UCI license to race EWS events outside of your home country now, but looking through the technical guide for this upcoming Derby race for example, no mention of anti-doping whatsoever.
http://admin.enduroworldseries.com/uploads/documents/races/1553474444.pdf

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3/26/2019 2:00 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/26/2019 2:06 AM

Considering this is the first year that the EWS has affiliated itself with the UCI for sporting control purposes, races which had very little or no doping control in the past will now be subject to UCI Doping Rules, which, essentially, are the application of WADA guidelines to the sport of cycling.

https://www.uci.org/docs/default-source/rules-and-regulations/part-xiv--anti-doping-rules.pdf

https://www.uci.org/inside-uci/clean-sport/anti-doping/uci-anti-doping-programme

My guess is they will probably do doping control at EWS rounds similar to how they would do it at World Cups, World Championships, and Continental Championship events. The decision on which WADA laboratory to tap and who the doping control officer/s will be will come directly from Aigle itself, and not made by the local federation or even the continental confederation.

Technical guides are generally prepared by the race organizer and not the UCI. The national federation may or may not be consulted (in events in asia, where I am from, they usually are). This is one reason why technical guides at different events can be radically different to each other, even if both events are at an HC level or higher.

In the case of Taz, they may have used the 2017 version as a template, at which point, the EWS was still not affiliated with the UCI, hence the absence of any anti-doping line items. Good find, btw.



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