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Overpriced MTB products?

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7/2/2014 9:44 AM

Are there bike-related products that you feel are just way over-priced?

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7/3/2014 9:28 AM

Neck braces. Though I understand that it's in large part due to liability insurance.

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7/5/2014 7:10 PM

Big Bird wrote:

Neck braces. Though I understand that it's in large part due to liability insurance.

i don't agree with that because you look at the amount of testing that has to be done and it justifies the price and just like the saying "you have a zero dollar head you don't wear a helmet, you have a 100 dollar head you wear a 100 dollar helmet" same in my mind with neck braces.

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7/7/2014 9:57 AM

dropper seat posts

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7/7/2014 10:10 AM

Enve

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7/7/2014 10:40 AM

Tires have gotten pricey lately, I remember getting them for around 50 bucks each (Specialized Butcher DH) and now they are around $70 for the same dam tire lol. Also the new sram one by eleven stuff is far too expensive, good reason to buy shimano (holds up better too)

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7/7/2014 11:01 AM

Yep, definitely the SRAM 1x11 drivetrains! Less components for more money. How does that work? You can buy a new motorcycle engine for that price. Forks and shocks are overpriced in my opinion too. You can buy an entire decent quality mtb bike for the price of a retailed fork and shock. Wheelsets are also overpriced. I can get two top of the line forged aluminum wheels for my car for the same price as two decent mtb wheels. Even the frames are often overpriced. I'm not saying they should be sold for super cheap but they often sell their low-spec bike for less money than the frame itself which makes no sense. And ultimately, it's just aluminum and maybe some bolts and bearings. The point is, you shouldn't be able to get a nice motorcycle for less money than a mid-range non-carbon mountain bike.

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7/7/2014 11:09 AM

Not actual bike parts, but I think bike related tools can often be wildly overpriced.

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7/7/2014 11:23 AM

Don't forget that products don't just appear. Its not just manufacturing costs that need to be covered. Engineers need a salary and the months and years of product development need to be paid for. Yes some things are expensive, but not necessarily overpriced. Park tool is overpriced in my opinion. They've grabbed everyone's attention by being a bike specific brand but you can get a lot of the same stuff from automotive brands which are just as good quality and much cheaper. Not sure how they charge so much for their bike stands.

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7/7/2014 11:51 AM

Tyres , stupid money these days , though they do perform very well..

Chain devices , always been over priced and now there is so little material in them to be light and trendy yet the prices don't seem to reflect that to me , they can't argue the ' technology/devleopment ' argument there because well.. there is none to be done. not to mention most of them are wrecked on one hit.

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7/7/2014 12:04 PM

In terms of bike-related products, there are not that many items that are actually overpriced if you really think about it. Look at it this way: if items were truly over-priced, they would disappear from availability since they would not sell, and no sales means no return, which means no justification for their existence. Same is true for trails. Trails that do not get ridden get reclaimed by nature and disappear from existence. So the fact that certain expensive products exist for any reasonable amount of time proves they are absolutely not overpriced; someone is buying them to justify keeping the item available. The reality is that the item we want is more than we are willing to spend. In that case, it's a perception problem, not a pricing problem.

None of us need factory one-by setups, adjustable seat posts, carbon rims, or a specific brand or model of tire. Home-made one-bys or last generation two-bys work well enough; a fixed seatpost and quick release seatpost clamp is an effective and dirt cheap combo; aluminum rims aren't that much lighter (and usually don't fail destructively either); and there are some cheap tire options floating around that will get the job done. In other words, almost all bike-related items have an effective, value-focused alternative, yet very few of us choose to pursue those options. Instead, the items we want but cannot afford are negatively branded as "over-priced" and criticized for it.

In the case of SRAM one-by, Enve, and most adjustable seatposts, those items are advertized as high-end products, so it's no surprise that they are expensive. Likewise, Porsche is considered high-end, so it is no surprise there are priced accordingly, yet they are rarely criticized for it. You don't hear Hyundai owners angrily criticizing Porsche because they couldn't afford a Carrera and had to settle for a Genesis. So what makes mountain biking different? I think the better question is not "are there bike-related products that you feel are just way over-priced," but "why do mountain bikers criticize expensive high-end products they want but cannot afford?" I honestly would like to know why that is specific to mountain bikers (or at least mountain bike forum users).

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7/7/2014 1:26 PM

Everything.

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7/7/2014 1:43 PM

One that hasn't been mentioned, but comes to mind is mtb specific clothing. $100+ for a pair of shorts? $75 for a jersey. I'll pass. Thankfully deals can be had on clothes.

I agree with Bigburd on chain guides being a bit steep for what it is.

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7/7/2014 3:23 PM

Nicholast wrote:

In terms of bike-related products, there are not that many items that are actually overpriced if you really think about it. Look at it this way: if items were truly over-priced, they would disappear from availability since they would not sell, and no sales means no return, which means no justification for their existence. Same is true for trails. Trails that do not get ridden get reclaimed by nature and disappear from existence. So the fact that certain expensive products exist for any reasonable amount of time proves they are absolutely not overpriced; someone is buying them to justify keeping the item available. The reality is that the item we want is more than we are willing to spend. In that case, it's a perception problem, not a pricing problem.

None of us need factory one-by setups, adjustable seat posts, carbon rims, or a specific brand or model of tire. Home-made one-bys or last generation two-bys work well enough; a fixed seatpost and quick release seatpost clamp is an effective and dirt cheap combo; aluminum rims aren't that much lighter (and usually don't fail destructively either); and there are some cheap tire options floating around that will get the job done. In other words, almost all bike-related items have an effective, value-focused alternative, yet very few of us choose to pursue those options. Instead, the items we want but cannot afford are negatively branded as "over-priced" and criticized for it.

In the case of SRAM one-by, Enve, and most adjustable seatposts, those items are advertized as high-end products, so it's no surprise that they are expensive. Likewise, Porsche is considered high-end, so it is no surprise there are priced accordingly, yet they are rarely criticized for it. You don't hear Hyundai owners angrily criticizing Porsche because they couldn't afford a Carrera and had to settle for a Genesis. So what makes mountain biking different? I think the better question is not "are there bike-related products that you feel are just way over-priced," but "why do mountain bikers criticize expensive high-end products they want but cannot afford?" I honestly would like to know why that is specific to mountain bikers (or at least mountain bike forum users).

Tell it to us Brotha! Amen!

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7/7/2014 3:30 PM

Saddles. I believe most are made by Velo, probably designed by them as well. Then "branded" and marked up.

And I'll throw in any rebranded products. Catalog picking is not innovation. Price accordingly.

P

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7/7/2014 9:34 PM

The reason some products are overpriced is simple, we the consumers are ignorant idiots, and will happily pay massively higher prices than the actual cost price because we believe that this means the product will perform better or be safer and have no clue about the costs of materials. What could be better for a manufacturer? Sell more product the more they increase the price! Look at Schwalbe, Enve or POC. Honestly do they really make superior products or do they just have good marketing?

You may not believe me, but I went of a tour of a hose fitting company who made their attachments out of plastic, cost absolutely cents to make, cheaper than a dollar for each fitting, however their market research said that they had to charge more than a normal reasonable profit margin, that's because that price was so low consumers believed 'for that price this product can't be any good'. So they then spend some their excessive products into advertising and R&D.

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7/7/2014 10:20 PM

Flat pedals, those really flat ones.

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7/8/2014 2:54 AM

Reinforcer wrote:

Flat pedals, those really flat ones.

you don't want those anyway wink

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7/8/2014 3:46 PM

Crankbrothers. They should pay you to run that garbage.

Shorts... wtf people, GFY

Tires. My dirtbike tires cost less, and I dont get cost on dirtbike tires.

Crankbrothers.

Also pretty much everything else. Back in 08 or so, you had to be trying to spend 6000 dollars on a bike. 5000 was super high-end. Now, you can hit that with totally middle of the road components.

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7/8/2014 7:04 PM

Nicholast wrote:

In terms of bike-related products, there are not that many items that are actually overpriced if you really think about it. Look at it this way: if items were truly over-priced, they would disappear from availability since they would not sell, and no sales means no return, which means no justification for their existence. Same is true for trails. Trails that do not get ridden get reclaimed by nature and disappear from existence. So the fact that certain expensive products exist for any reasonable amount of time proves they are absolutely not overpriced; someone is buying them to justify keeping the item available. The reality is that the item we want is more than we are willing to spend. In that case, it's a perception problem, not a pricing problem.

None of us need factory one-by setups, adjustable seat posts, carbon rims, or a specific brand or model of tire. Home-made one-bys or last generation two-bys work well enough; a fixed seatpost and quick release seatpost clamp is an effective and dirt cheap combo; aluminum rims aren't that much lighter (and usually don't fail destructively either); and there are some cheap tire options floating around that will get the job done. In other words, almost all bike-related items have an effective, value-focused alternative, yet very few of us choose to pursue those options. Instead, the items we want but cannot afford are negatively branded as "over-priced" and criticized for it.

In the case of SRAM one-by, Enve, and most adjustable seatposts, those items are advertized as high-end products, so it's no surprise that they are expensive. Likewise, Porsche is considered high-end, so it is no surprise there are priced accordingly, yet they are rarely criticized for it. You don't hear Hyundai owners angrily criticizing Porsche because they couldn't afford a Carrera and had to settle for a Genesis. So what makes mountain biking different? I think the better question is not "are there bike-related products that you feel are just way over-priced," but "why do mountain bikers criticize expensive high-end products they want but cannot afford?" I honestly would like to know why that is specific to mountain bikers (or at least mountain bike forum users).

Decent points, but you haven't considered a few things...
Bicycles are not rocket science.
The stupidly large amount of companies which are effectively not in competition but should be because they are only separated by marketing, and as such, perceived performance.
We are the suckers that drive the price because we keep buying into it... It's no wonder the industry is worried about YT.

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7/9/2014 6:48 AM

Everything in Australia! ......don't come here if you want a good deal
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7/9/2014 6:50 AM

SaddleRags wrote:

One that hasn't been mentioned, but comes to mind is mtb specific clothing. $100+ for a pair of shorts? $75 for a jersey. I'll pass. Thankfully deals can be had on clothes.

I agree with Bigburd on chain guides being a bit steep for what it is.

Australian shops sell 2 year old jerseys for $80, and i saw the latest 2014 tld jerseys for $165 the other day in a shop

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10/14/2014 1:26 PM

Pins for flat pedals. Was going to get some official straightline pins £40, identical 'cheap' ones about £3

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