The Patent Thread - New and Wild Mountain Bike Inventions

9/28/2017 8:30 PM

sideshow wrote:

This feature would be very helpful in this game: Click here to waste a lot of time.

I wonder why someone thinks this would be a necessary addition to the "bike". Do they really anticipate such novice riders to be that over-confident when using their product that they need to effectively "idiot proof" the vehicle? Or are the proposed designs of the machine so unwieldy, that they need to include what amounts to a gyroscope?

Weird times.

With that said, Shimano and their electric road dropper seem to be on track with some cool innovations.

I've seen mountainbikers in 2017.

This is an absolute necessity.

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9/28/2017 8:53 PM

kidwoo wrote:

I've seen mountainbikers in 2017.

This is an absolute necessity.

...that makes me nervous. Jerry needs to chill.

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10/4/2017 12:55 PM

bturman wrote:

Shimano and SRAM are at it again, each with their own way of moving the front chainring in an axial direction in order to improve the chainline on 1X drivetrains.





USPTO Application # 20170167542 by Shimano Inc: Bicycle crank assembly

"Among bicycles equipped with a single front sprocket and a plurality of rear sprockets, gear shifting has been conventionally carried out by operation of a rear derailleur. When a gear shifting operation is performed by operation of the rear derailleur, chances are that a chain is disposed in an oblique position relative to the faces of the front sprocket while being wound around the front sprocket and any of the rear sprockets. When the chain is disposed in an oblique position while being wound around the front sprocket and any of the rear sprockets, it is concerned that the chain may be disengaged from the front sprocket. In light of this concern, a conventional construction has been proposed for making the chain unlikely to be disengaged from the front sprocket. In this conventional construction, the front sprocket is configured to be movable in an axial direction arranged in parallel to a rotational center axis whereby the chain is unlikely to be disposed in an extremely oblique position."

"A bicycle crank assembly includes a sprocket having a rotational center axis, a crank, a crank axle and a slide mechanism. The crank axle is attached to the crank and includes an internal space. The slide mechanism is configured to displace the sprocket relatively to the crank in an axial direction parallel to the rotational center axis. At least part of the slide mechanism is disposed in the internal space of the crank axle."

Read more.



USPTO Application # 20170167590 by Sram Deutschland Gmbh: Chainring

"Attempts are often made to avoid problematic shifting under load at the front chainring. Instead of this shiftin under load coverage of as much as possible of the gear spectrum is achieved by means of a correspondingly developed rear multiple sprocket arrangement. A front single chainring together with a high number of eleven or twelve rear sprockets can achieves good coverage. On account of the high number of axially adjacent sprockets on the rear wheel, the width of the multiple sprocket arrangement is certainly enlarged. The chain that meshes with the chainring is also axially secured on the front chainring by means of the axially secured single chainring. On the rear wheel, however, the chain has to overcome a section of several centimetres when shifting from the smallest to the largest sprocket in the axial direction. This increasingly results in the chain running at an angle (also called skew) which has a negative effect on the efficiency, the wear susceptibility, and the noise development of the drive.

Possible solutions which deal with this problem are known from the prior art. Axially displaceable single chainrings which are to adapt to the chain line are thus provided."

"A chainring includes a first chainring segment and a second chainring segment for a chainring arrangement of a bicycle. Further provided is a chainring arrangement and a drive arrangement for a bicycle with at least one chainring. The segmented chainring arrangement is particularly suitable for bicycles with only one front chainring."

Read more.

Shimano continues to pursue this idea and has added an upper chainguide that moves side to side as well. The cable appears to pass through the front guide on its way to the rear derailleur.







USPTO Application # 20170274961 by Shimano Inc: Bicycle chain device

"A bicycle chain device that includes a mounting bracket configured to be affixed to a bicycle. The bicycle has a solitary bicycle front sprocket. A cage is movably mounted to the mounting bracket so that the cage is positioned adjacent to the front sprocket. The cage has a chain-receiving slot, through which a bicycle chain passes. The cage is configured to move in accordance with a shifting operation of a bicycle rear derailleur to maintain alignment with a chain to prevent the chain from falling off the sprocket."

Read more.

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10/24/2017 5:17 AM

I don't know if the bicycle industry has seen a full-CNC frame before, but one will be live in production during winter/spring. Pole Bicycles are currently working with a prototype, The first one out of the oven is a long travel 29r for enduro and we might see a downhill model on the world cup circuit next year.

It has taken them quite an effort to come up with the model and process on how this is possible. And they've come up with a process where you can machine it as two parts and bond them together and they are planning on machining some factory parts for the bikes as well in the process.

Here is a sneak preview of the front triangle:

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10/24/2017 7:40 AM

Don't really see how machining such a large hunk of metal would be effective, what i do see though is maybe stamping a half, fixing some small parts here and there and then bonding the two halves together. But Intense was doing that in a similar, but less aggressive fashion a while ago for the top tube on their M6 i think. It might be possible to stamp out a whole frame half, bond it together (i'm not sure about the bond surface area though), maybe with headtube inserts as well (so it doesn't split in two due to the bearing being pressed in), then drill out and fix the bottom bracket, pivot points and the mounting holes. Maybe even add inserts for the pivot points and the BB to clamp the two halves together even better.

I wonder if it would be possible and what kind of numbers would be needed to make it profitable...

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4/3/2018 1:43 PM

Hank Matheson contacted us about a new two-dimensional suspension patent he's been awarded.



Press Release - A new Two-Dimensional Bicycle Rear Suspension System has been granted U.S. Patent #9,908,583. In development by Hank Matheson and Jon Heim since 2010, this suspension system combines independent vertical and rearward axle paths. The axle path changes depending on the direction of the hit to the rear wheel. This allows the axle path to conform to the force vector traveling through the axle.



Hank Matheson mentioned “I am happy to have been granted this patent and to have been able to work with Jon. I am also excited to ride the thing.”

Jon Heim said, "When Hank showed me the CandyMan prototype I thought he should apply for a patent. I was impressed with how simple and compact it was for 2-D suspension. We came up with additional configurations like the MissingLink, a 2-D link that slides instead of pivots and is almost hidden. It's nice to get validation from the US Patent Office."





See more on their Facebook page.

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4/3/2018 4:23 PM

Credit to Hank for having a reasonable-looking design...aesthetics are the first battleground with anything new!

Things I'd like to know more about:

Are the two planes independent?
If not, where is the threshold for each, and how do they interact?
Can we get Antonio to graph this machine?
What are your thoughts on similar bikes of the past, like the Kiwi designed 2Stage Elite, Foes FFR Dual Damper, and Corsair's Crown DH?
What makes this design superior or a better platform (relative to those before it, and in comparison to current options)?
Was this an exercise in engineering or practical application i.e. was this just a fun project or are you looking to take it further?
Is it possible to package this design in a such a way that it would be competitive in weight, price, and usability?

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4/3/2018 7:04 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/28/2019 4:10 PM

Yeah Hank! Freakin' awesome. Run with it! Josh Walters here. It was a pleasure working with you on my bike, which I've now replaced the SWD swingarm on with a Santa Cruz Bullit one. I'd love get in on the ground floor and help you refine this further, but there's no way in Hell that I'd move to that city. (San Francisco.) Good luck. Hope you make millions.

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6/20/2018 12:54 PM
Edited Date/Time: 6/20/2018 1:08 PM

New gearbox system is on the way... Will be probably out at Eurobike this year.

Abstract:

A switchable under load transmission, with a bearing in a gear housing (7) input shaft (11) and output shaft (12), characterized by the following features:
a) In the gear housing (7) is located at least one crown gear (25), which (with at least one Kronenradritzel 23) is constantly in mesh.
b) At least one crown wheel (25) and at least one Kronenradritzel (23) is indirectly connected to the output shaft (12) and input shaft (11) in connection.
c) During one rotation of a crown wheel (25) is the Kronenradritzel (23) does not (with each tooth of the crown wheel 25) in engagement.
d) during more than one rotation of a crown wheel (25) can pass the Kronenradritzel (23) with each tooth of the crown wheel (25) in engagement.
e) At least one Kronenradritzel (23) (relative to the crown 25) are displaced over a distance which is greater than twice the width of the tooth Kronenradritzels (23).

Nicolai Gearbox






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10/9/2018 3:32 PM

MEGA UPDATE! Here are several new patent applications that may hint at future development in the mountain bike world:



SRAM has several things seemingly in the works, the most interesting of which include a hydraulically damped rear derailleur to replace a traditional friction-style clutch mechanism. Claimed benefits include less force while shifting, more consistent production, and may make for more reliable chain tension over time.

USPTO Application # 20180274623: Fluid damper for a bicycle component by Sram, Llc

"A bicycle rear derailleur has a base member mountable to a bicycle frame, a movable member movably coupled to the base member, a chain guide assembly rotatably connected to the movable member for rotation about a rotational axis, a biasing element configured and arranged to bias the chain guide assembly for rotation in a first rotational direction with respect to the movable member, and a fluid damper having a fluid cavity containing a volume of fluid."



USPTO Application # 20180186419 : Adjustable seatpost by Sram, Llc

"A seat post assembly for a bicycle has a first tube with a first distal end and a second tube with a second distal end. The first and second tubes are movable relative to one another to establish a distance between the first and second distal ends. A first pressure chamber has a loaded pressure proportional to a load applied along the tube axis. A second pressure chamber has a second pressure not proportional to the load."



USPTO Application # 20180257737: Bicycle electric telescopic apparatus, bicycle power supply system, and bicycle electric component system by Shimano Inc.

"A bicycle electric telescopic apparatus comprises a first tube, a second tube, a positioning structure, an electric positioning actuator, and a power supply. The first tube has a center axis. The second tube is telescopically received in the first tube. The positioning structure is configured to relatively position the first tube and the second tube in a telescopic direction extending along the center axis of the first tube."



USPTO Application # 20180079462: Bicycle telescopic apparatus by Shimano Inc.

"A bicycle telescopic apparatus includes a first tube having a receiving space, a second tube telescopically received in the receiving space of the first tube, a position detector configured to detect a relative position between the first tube and the second tube in a longitudinal direction of the bicycle telescopic apparatus, and an output device configured to output a signal based on a detected result of the position detector. The signal can control a bicycle component other than the bicycle telescopic apparatus. A detecting point of the position detector is located in the receiving space of the first tube."



USPTO Application # 20180072370: Bicycle component operating apparatus by Shimano Inc.

"A bicycle component operating apparatus includes a first operating device and a second operating device. The first operating device includes a base member, a main body and an operating member. The base member has a clamp configured to be coupled to a handlebar. The operating member is movably arranged with respect to the base member. The operating device member is configured to perform an operation of at least one of a bicycle transmission component and a bicycle brake..."



USPTO Application # 20180086412: Bicycle operation device by Shimano Inc.

"A bicycle operation device includes a clamp and an operation unit. The clamp is attachable to a handlebar of a bicycle. The operation unit includes a wireless communicator configured to communicate with a bicycle component and an electric switch configured to transmit a signal to the wireless communicator. The operation unit is attachable to the clamp in a manner allowing for adjustment of the position of the operation unit relative to the clamp."



USPTO Application # 20180265153: Bicycle suspension tube and bicycle suspension fork by Shimano Inc.

"A bicycle suspension tube comprises a tubular body, a wheel attachment part, and a caliper attachment part. The wheel attachment part is provided on the tubular body. The wheel attachment part includes an attachment hole having a rotational center axis. The caliper attachment part is provided on the tubular body. The caliper attachment part includes a first through hole having a first longitudinal axis non-parallel to the rotational center axis."





USPTO Application # 20170334514: Bicycle system and automatic control system thereof by Giant Manufacturing Co., Ltd.

"An automatic control method suitable for a bicycle system is provided. The bicycle system has a gear ratio and a toque ratio formed by an auxiliary torque and a pedaling torque. The automatic control method includes following steps: sensing a pedaling cadence and the pedaling torque of the bicycle system in a riding state; setting a first cadence threshold and a second cadence threshold according to a preset pedaling cadence while the first cadence threshold is greater..."



USPTO Application # 20180037295: Bicycle rear suspension system by Level One Engineering Llc

"A bicycle may include a front triangle and a rear suspension system that couples the front triangle to a rear wheel and is dampened by at least one shock absorber. The rear suspension system includes a six-bar linkage having two ternary links separated from each other by one or more binary links, such that the two ternary links do not share a common joint. One of the ternary links may comprise a chain stay. In some examples, the other ternary link may comprise the front..."





USPTO Application # 20180148123: Suspension for a bicycle by Brent Neilson

"Disclosed is a suspension for a bicycle. The suspension has a swingarm having a front and rear end and wherein the rear end is configured to attach to a rear wheel of a bicycle, an upper and lower link both adapted to pivotally connect the swing arm to the frame of a bicycle, and a jackshaft having a drive side and a non drive side sprocket and being connected to the front end of the swingarm, the suspension configured such that when in use with a bicycle, a chain connects... "



USPTO Application # 20180148130: Lever driven bicycle with synchronous drive ratio control by John H. Staehlin

"A lever driven bicycle with synchronous drive ratio control is disclosed. The lever driven bicycle may include a pair of drive levers pivotable around an axis. The lever driven bicycle may also include a force applicator connected to each drive lever, each force applicator configured to receive an application of a force to rotate a drive wheel. The lever driven bicycle may further include a control mechanism connected to the pair of drive levers, the control mechanism configured to synchronously adjust a drive ratio of each drive lever."

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10/9/2018 4:24 PM

Figure 5 (of the 6 bar linkage) has the chain ring on the wrong side of the frame compared to the cassette?

-Brett

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10/9/2018 6:17 PM

Carraig042 wrote:

Figure 5 (of the 6 bar linkage) has the chain ring on the wrong side of the frame compared to the cassette?

-Brett

It's on the correct side - there is an intermediate idler shaft.

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10/9/2018 6:30 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/9/2018 6:56 PM

I thought the same thing, but in other pictures the non-drive side sprocket is connected to the main suspension pivot, which is also a driveshaft that connects via chain to the cassette. Where do people learn to write like that? Patents are an entirely different language

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10/9/2018 7:07 PM

Carraig042 wrote:

Figure 5 (of the 6 bar linkage) has the chain ring on the wrong side of the frame compared to the cassette?

-Brett

jezken wrote:

It's on the correct side - there is an intermediate idler shaft.

I see what you are talking about.

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10/9/2018 9:52 PM

brimmergj wrote:

I thought the same thing, but in other pictures the non-drive side sprocket is connected to the main suspension pivot, which is also a driveshaft that connects via chain to the cassette. Where do people learn to write like that? Patents are an entirely different language

They learn to write like that by applying for many patents.

If you are too exact with your patent application, it's easy for other to get around it, just change a detail. Say you write 'is bolted to something' in the patent application, and someone else would use clips, going around your patent. It's the little things in the stupid world of patents.

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10/10/2018 12:21 PM

Carraig042 wrote:

Figure 5 (of the 6 bar linkage) has the chain ring on the wrong side of the frame compared to the cassette?

-Brett

jezken wrote:

It's on the correct side - there is an intermediate idler shaft.

Thank you Brett that was very insightful

- Rodger

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10/10/2018 2:47 PM

Automatic ""gearbox"" for giant, unified electric system for shimano... Crazy. But that caliper mount must be for roadbike

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10/10/2018 7:37 PM

bturman wrote:

Hank Matheson contacted us about a new two-dimensional suspension patent he's been awarded.



Press Release - A new Two-Dimensional Bicycle Rear Suspension System has been granted U.S. Patent #9,908,583. In development by Hank Matheson and Jon Heim since 2010, this suspension system combines independent vertical and rearward axle paths. The axle path changes depending on the direction of the hit to the rear wheel. This allows the axle path to conform to the force vector traveling through the axle.



Hank Matheson mentioned “I am happy to have been granted this patent and to have been able to work with Jon. I am also excited to ride the thing.”

Jon Heim said, "When Hank showed me the CandyMan prototype I thought he should apply for a patent. I was impressed with how simple and compact it was for 2-D suspension. We came up with additional configurations like the MissingLink, a 2-D link that slides instead of pivots and is almost hidden. It's nice to get validation from the US Patent Office."





See more on their Facebook page.



https://patents.google.com/patent/US20150115569?oq=hank+matheson


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10/10/2018 7:38 PM


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10/10/2018 8:42 PM

Shimanos getting into the fork game and is moving the tapped mtg holes to the calipers to force you to only use their brake/fork combo? Seems very SRAM of them

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10/10/2018 9:34 PM

It's an ordinary flat mount caliper, which is very common in road bikes with disc brakes. Wouldn't be surprised of mountainbikes get them at some point as well, mainly due to the thread location.

PVD has been designing different mounts for different rotor sizes already.
http://www.peterverdone.com/disc-brake-mounting-systems/

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10/10/2018 9:36 PM

mamath7 wrote:

Automatic ""gearbox"" for giant, unified electric system for shimano... Crazy. But that caliper mount must be for roadbike

Also, suspension locking based on the pedalling cadence and torque.

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10/26/2018 6:23 PM

A friend of mine just showed me this interesting new bike. Being called Catlander. http://www.catlander.com/patents

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10/26/2018 7:39 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/26/2018 7:41 PM

Definitely interesting looking.

http://www.catlander.com

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10/27/2018 3:29 AM

Hm, actually thought about the possibility of using a similar linkage (without any pulleys attached to it) for a frame design almost 10 years ago. Linear and vertical rear axle paths were the rage at those days, i saw the Watt's linkage at the time and started thinking about how to make it one sided. Lo and behold, it's called a Chebyshev linkage and it also gives a fairly linear path on a point in the middle link.

And yes, i know Catlander isn't using it for that given the foot has a huge overhang and a really rearwards axle path, but still.

On the other hand, i am joining the comments that it looks complicated and heavy and am not sure wether it can be made lighter or light enough. In general the best solutions are usually the simplest solutions, sadly. That's why there are all the 'looks like a session' comments outt here lately. Because it's the simplest solution to the problem of a full suspension frame that works.

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12/6/2018 10:12 AM

BikeRumor beat you to it, Brandon... I guess there's too much going on with the racing rumors thread and Spomer scheming with all the Vital staffers for the impending attack on Levy's house after PinkBike released their own #VitalTestSessions

SRAM thru axle mounted derailleurs that have a hydraulic damped clutch...
https://bikerumor.com/2018/12/04/patent-patrol-direct-thru-axle-mounted-hydraulically-damped-sram-rear-derailleurs/

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1/31/2019 10:25 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/31/2019 11:42 AM

Curious to know more about Guerrilla Gravity's new manufacturing method and carbon material? So were we, so we dug up the patent application. Thermoplastic resins are in use, and the patent covers how to make a hollow structure out of the material.

This article provides a high-level overview of thermoset resins (used in traditional carbon frames) versus thermoplastic resins and their various pros and cons. For those wanting to dive deep, this presentation offers even more.

This isn't the first time thermoplastic composites have been used in the bike industry, but Guerrilla Gravity may well be the first to truly make it work.





USPTO Application #US20180264756A1 by Guerrilla Industries LLC - Composite structures and methods of forming composite structures

Abstract: Composite structures and methods of forming composite structures are provided. The composite structures can include one or more composite structure components. Each composite structure component is formed from a composite panel that includes one or more sheets of material. The sheets of material include a thermoplastic material and a plurality of reinforcing fibers. A composite panel can be formed in three dimensions to form a composite structure component. Multiple composite structure components can be fused to one another to form a composite structure. In addition, each composite structure component and the composite structure formed therefrom can include an aperture. An interior volume can be formed between adjacent composite structure components. Methods for forming a composite structure can include a step of simultaneously molding and fusing composite structure components.

Read more





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1/31/2019 12:22 PM

Always appreciated these additional sleuthing posts and nerding.

Something that got me in the GG article was the supposed "recycling". This quote notes that the idea of recycling this stuff is still not totally there:" This also allows for the recycling of the thermoplastic composite at end of life. (In theory, not yet commercial)". I would love to hear if the GG guys have actually done and recycling of sorts with tested materials...

Also for all you composite nerds out there- Check out The Ruckus Composites for carbon repair and very interesting podcast about repairing/working with/testing/theory of composites in the bike industry.

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2/28/2019 4:10 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/28/2019 4:11 PM

Just a potential Million Dollar Idea that I'd like to throw out there. (MDI = I have an idea, you make it work, you make the millions and then IFF you're a good person, you come back later and throw some cash in my face in thanks. Let's make the world a better place!)

There's a lot of talk out there over frame designs that favor either coil springs or air springs due to their leverage ratios. This shock choice conundrum stems from the fact that the poor little shock alone is responsible for stopping the travel at bottom out.

What if the frame itself was responsible for limiting the travel Before all that pressure was slammed into the shock? One could work adjustable bottom out bumpers into the frame itself. Kind of like Santa Cruz and Intense bikes have those little rubber top out bumpers on their VPP suspensions, just at the other end of travel. With an air can, the bumper could just be tuned to accept the harsh bottom out only, relying on the ramp up of the air spring for the progression curve and preventing the harsh hit inside of the damper.. With coil shocks, both the placement and durometer of the bumper could be adjusted to provide a nice soft, or firm landing?

By the way "IFF" is a term in the language of logic that means "If and only if." So sorry Brad H. this offer does not apply to you. Feel free to run with it Hank, or anyone else worthy!

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2/28/2019 5:29 PM

It has been done on the Pivot Phoenix, to reduce stress on coil shocks.


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