Share Your Tubeless Tips

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11/30/2015 11:57 AM

If you run tubeless, share the tips and tricks you've learned over the years and even your preferred setup.

I'll kick it off w/ Joe Barnes' compressor hack from last year which I personally tried yet : )

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11/30/2015 12:07 PM

I am currently using the Bontrager TLR Flash Charger Floor Pump for my tubeless needs. There is nothing super fancy about it and I imagine it does the same thing Joe Barnes soda bottle does. I would say the one thing to always start with when setting up a tubeless tire is to remove the valve core before you do anything else. This allows for more air to pass through the valve quicker and setting the tire faster, and you don't have to worry about a massive sealant mess.

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11/30/2015 12:47 PM

That pump & bottle trick looks cool, as does the new floor pumps with the burst capability. I'll probably go that direction once my trusty pump dies but I'm in no hurry as the nearby gas station has a nice compressor and free air 24/7.

Here's a few tips I've learned along the way and I'm sure I'm forgetting some:

Be sure to seat the bead of the tire as far down in the rim as possible when putting the tire on the rim and end at the valve stem. This is especially important with tubeless tires without a wire bead as the fit will be tight and you're using just your hands to mount the tire to the rim.

Don't use tire levers as you might damage the folding bead (I've done that once!) resulting in a tire that has to be binned.

Use plenty of soapy water once you're ready to inflate. It helps the bead slide into place and helps trap the air inside so your chances of inflation are better.

Inflate the tires without sealant first with the core removed as mentioned above. Then once the tire has popped into place, use a plastic syringe to squirt the right amount of sealant through the valve. Then insert the core and reinflate the tire. No mess at all.

Speaking of sealant, before you pour it into the measuring cup be sure to slosh that stuff around vigorously as it tends to settle over time and the good stuff sits at the bottom of the bottle. Double check that you have the cap on the bottle when shaking it hard as I've done that too.

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11/30/2015 12:54 PM

I've been running ghetto setup for years, no need for expensive tubeless ready rims/tyres (or both). Only downside is that it makes changing tyres unconventinal as it requires bmx tube to be destroyed (not really free). But if you are like me, who rocks a pair of tyres untill they are worn out it is perfect! In this config the tyre sits on inner tube, so the contact is rubber on rubber which in combination with sealant makes perfect seal, so good it is sometimes difficult to get tyre of if you need to change it. Once I bent wall of the rim really badly, somewhere in the middle of nowhere during holiday in France. I managed to ride down 3 downhill trails (and 2 lifts up) before I got home. No other setup would get me home without loooong walk that day! To make it pretty much follow this guide.

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11/30/2015 12:56 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/30/2015 12:57 PM

If the tire's too loose when put on the rim and wont seat (even w/ an air-compressor). Adding a layer or two of Velox or other cloth rim-strips OVER the tubeless strip or tape can help by taking up some extra space.

Also, this:



Pinch your floor-pump's hose towards the head and pressurize it by pumping a couple times. W/ the valve core removed, release the built up pressure and continue to go HAM on your pump until it seats. Works some of the time, all the time.


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I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.

11/30/2015 1:03 PM

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torgrimirgrot

11/30/2015 2:08 PM

A small compressor can be similar in price to a good floor pump. I've had one instead of a pump for years. Even then, you can struggle with new tires. Remove the valve core and connect an air blower to the open valve with clear plastic tubing (this ensures a tight seal and avoids jamming the blower in between spokes or rotors). Blast some air until the tire bead seats, remove the plastic tube and cover the open valve with your finger before screwing in the core. Even if you miss covering up the valve and all the air escapes, the tire bead will still remain seated and you simply install the core and inflate.

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11/30/2015 2:13 PM

This is a solution I found specifically for Stan's no tubes rims but I'm guessing it'll work on any wheel where the tyre snaps into place on the rim. So I was having real trouble seating just my front tyre, I don't have removable valve cores (too lazy to get them, and wanted to get it done so I could ride). I applied loads of soapy water to no avail so I put a tube back in the tyre, pumped it up until the bead snapped into place, then just unseated one side to remove the tube, add sealant and valves, then tried again. Having one side already seated halves the amount of air escaping from the tyre-rim whilst trying to inflate, it went up no problem. If you're really stuck I hope this helps

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11/30/2015 2:56 PM

I remove the valve core. You can flow a lot more air that way. I also support the rim/tire off the ground from inside the rim, so the rubber isn't deformed in any way. When the bead seats, just pop your finger over the valve before the air rushes out. You will lose some, but not enough to un-seat the bead.

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11/30/2015 4:24 PM

Brand new folding bead tires might not seat easily right out of the package because they have folds in them beads still, so unpack and unfold and let them sit (lay) for a few days if not in a hurry. Or set them up with a tube first and let things stretch out, but this requires valve removal (not desirable).

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11/30/2015 4:50 PM

I also remove the valve core, I use my trusty air compressor in the garage and can swap tires pretty quickly. I'd say 15min for both tires.

After I air up the tire without the valve core, I simply screw in the valve core quickly as some air escapes. I air it up to my preferred PSI with the floor pump.

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11/30/2015 5:09 PM

OK, newb question here: how do you remove a valve core on a Presta valve? Do you loosen the nut all the way and then keep turning counterclockwise or something? I have the tool for a Schraeder valve but I hove no idea how those little ones work.

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11/30/2015 5:35 PM

Falcon wrote:

OK, newb question here: how do you remove a valve core on a Presta valve? Do you loosen the nut all the way and then keep turning counterclockwise or something? I have the tool for a Schraeder valve but I hove no idea how those little ones work.

They actually make a small tool called a valve core remover. Or you can use pliers as seen here::
http://www.twoknobbytires.com/media/presta-valve-removal.jpg

I recommend the valve core removal tool since it will not deform your Presta valve like pliers can::
https://www.westernbikeworks.com/product/stans-notubes-valve-core-remover?adl=1&utm_campaign=products&utm_source=google&utm_medium=base&gclid=CjwKEAiAhPCyBRCtwMDS5tzT03gSJADZ8VjRs6IbmocR7FARiOD0xCKLF8dB1ePee525oOwGyIdeghoC507w_wcB

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11/30/2015 7:12 PM

I use a layer of gorilla tape around the rim, pop a 949 Racing valve stem in, then another layer of tape, hook up a compressor and good to go. No need to remove the valve core with these stems, in my experience at least.

http://949racing.com/blackanodizedaluminumvalve.aspx

For sealant I use this mix with some large and small sized glitter thrown in.
http://www.huckingkitty.com/node/46

I use Schwalbe Super Gravity tires and use a dab of dish soap with a drop of water to apply on the leading edge of the tire to get over the rim. Those SG tires are rugged to get on.

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11/30/2015 9:55 PM

Hey guys here is my not so ghetto version and it works a treat!!! cheers

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12/1/2015 6:44 AM

inflate with a air compressor until the tire explodes off the rim. Completely useless in the long run, but a good way to scare your friends shitless, and have an aesthetically pleasing ringing sound in your ears for about 20 minutes.

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12/1/2015 6:46 AM

Skip stans, and just fill your tire with a mix of elmers glue, blood, motor oil, and tiger semen. Completely indestructible. As and added bonus, if you get your special concoction in an open wound, you run the risk of getting AIDS, a blood infection, or both, so it really trains you to be careful.

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12/1/2015 7:21 AM

mint355 wrote:

Hey guys here is my not so ghetto version and it works a treat!!! cheers

brilliant! seems more robust than my duct tape wrapped soda bottle... Looks like standard fittings going into the bottle, did you need to do anything special to make the connections?

that said, soapy water, soda bottle at ~120psi dumped into the tire, seats like a charm... add goop, valve core, inflate, ride.

Make sure your rim tape is sound, had the fluid leak out at the rim seam once when the tape on the rim was no longer secure (setting up an older rim for tubless that had been ridden with tubes for a few seasons, the existing rim tape adhesive had dried out and was no longer providing a solid seal.

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12/1/2015 7:24 AM

brimmergj wrote:

I use a layer of gorilla tape around the rim, pop a 949 Racing valve stem in, then another layer of tape, hook up a compressor and good to go. No need to remove the valve core with these stems, in my experience at least.

http://949racing.com/blackanodizedaluminumvalve.aspx

For sealant I use this mix with some large and small sized glitter thrown in.
http://www.huckingkitty.com/node/46

I use Schwalbe Super Gravity tires and use a dab of dish soap with a drop of water to apply on the leading edge of the tire to get over the rim. Those SG tires are rugged to get on.

I think you needed to make your own mix as the Slime sealant is so bad. Notubes' sealant is incomparably better, almost always seals any hole smaller than a 1/2cm, whereas Slime cant fix a thorn hole or valve leak...

In my experience:
Go full ghetto with a BMX tube on cheap rims.
Specialized's tubeless rim tape is incredibly cheap and effective for "tubeless ready" rims.
Spesh types on spesh rims will inflate with very little hassle.
CO2 cartridges are $2 a pop, and can be kept in a bag, meaning you could change over 50 tyres before that bontrager pump pays for itself...

Things I would like to try, an feedback?
Rice grains in the sealant (syndicate mechanic recommendation from some video)
Old bits of shirts as hole plugs with a spoke to push them in (does this work?)

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12/1/2015 7:39 AM

Eoin wrote:

I think you needed to make your own mix as the Slime sealant is so bad. Notubes' sealant is incomparably better, almost always seals any hole smaller than a 1/2cm, whereas Slime cant fix a thorn hole or valve leak...

In my experience:
Go full ghetto with a BMX tube on cheap rims.
Specialized's tubeless rim tape is incredibly cheap and effective for "tubeless ready" rims.
Spesh types on spesh rims will inflate with very little hassle.
CO2 cartridges are $2 a pop, and can be kept in a bag, meaning you could change over 50 tyres before that bontrager pump pays for itself...

Things I would like to try, an feedback?
Rice grains in the sealant (syndicate mechanic recommendation from some video)
Old bits of shirts as hole plugs with a spoke to push them in (does this work?)

Old bits of shirts as hole plugs with a spoke to push them in (does this work?)

Yes- it works well... thicker rag material seems to work best- like an old towel.

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12/1/2015 9:51 AM

A little tip for the soapy water thing, pour water into a bucket
fill it about3-4 inches with water
big old squirt of washing liquid
put your hand in with fingers spread and slosh it about till there is a very thick and tall foam, scoop only the foam from the top and chuck it on the beads
This way no water at all enters the tyre , as we know water and stans is not a good mix!

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12/1/2015 10:56 AM

Falcon wrote:

OK, newb question here: how do you remove a valve core on a Presta valve? Do you loosen the nut all the way and then keep turning counterclockwise or something? I have the tool for a Schraeder valve but I hove no idea how those little ones work.

Only specific valves are removable, but most tubeless valves have that feature. You'll mostly run into non-removable cores on actual tubes. Check the image as to which part is actually removable. I use anything from needle nose pliers to just my fingers, depending on how tight the core is.


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I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.

12/1/2015 10:58 AM

mint355 wrote:

Hey guys here is my not so ghetto version and it works a treat!!! cheers

Very cool!

Is there a valve somewhere you use to pressurize it?

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I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.

12/1/2015 5:24 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/1/2015 5:30 PM

I was wondering that too. Nice, clean set up. How many tires can one tank full fill?

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12/1/2015 5:31 PM

And nice sticker selection as well. That's key.

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12/1/2015 7:06 PM

mint355 wrote:

Hey guys here is my not so ghetto version and it works a treat!!! cheers

FredLikesTrikes wrote:

Very cool!

Is there a valve somewhere you use to pressurize it?

Yeah on the back side of the handle is a schrader valve

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12/1/2015 7:08 PM

Big Bird wrote:

I was wondering that too. Nice, clean set up. How many tires can one tank full fill?

Yeah just the one tyre its only a 4.5 litre extinguisher and i pump to about 100psi.

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12/1/2015 7:12 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/1/2015 7:13 PM

pmiska wrote:

brilliant! seems more robust than my duct tape wrapped soda bottle... Looks like standard fittings going into the bottle, did you need to do anything special to make the connections?

that said, soapy water, soda bottle at ~120psi dumped into the tire, seats like a charm... add goop, valve core, inflate, ride.

Make sure your rim tape is sound, had the fluid leak out at the rim seam once when the tape on the rim was no longer secure (setting up an older rim for tubless that had been ridden with tubes for a few seasons, the existing rim tape adhesive had dried out and was no longer providing a solid seal.

I work for a Fire company and went to the local hydrulic hose fitting shop uses a npt to bsa adaptor and a 1/4'' barbed/threaded fitting cost about $5 bucks and i had the hose from an old pump..

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12/2/2015 8:30 AM

I have found there is a significant difference in the bore of tubeless valves with removeable cores. The wider the bore, the greater the flow, and the easier it is to seat the tyre. I measure the bore by the largest size drill bit that will pass right through it.

The best valves are Specialized tubeless presta Valves. They pass almost 3x as much air as the others.

Specialized have a bore of 4mm ( area 12.6 mm sq). Stans and Superstar have a bore of 2.5 mm (area 4.9 mm sq).

Similarly ghetto tubeless with Schraeder valve tubes works well, as one can remove the valve core, and the bore of the schwalbe valve body is 3.5 mm (9.6mm sq).

As a bonus, the Specialized valves are also the cheapest.

TomR

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12/2/2015 5:05 PM

Falcon wrote:

OK, newb question here: how do you remove a valve core on a Presta valve? Do you loosen the nut all the way and then keep turning counterclockwise or something? I have the tool for a Schraeder valve but I hove no idea how those little ones work.

FredLikesTrikes wrote:

Only specific valves are removable, but most tubeless valves have that feature. You'll mostly run into non-removable cores on actual tubes. Check the image as to which part is actually removable. I use anything from needle nose pliers to just my fingers, depending on how tight the core is.


Sweet, thanks! Yeah, my valves look like the ones on the left, so I'm golden.

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