Shelter Frame Protection Tape?

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4/12/2011 10:51 AM
Edited Date/Time: 4/12/2011 10:52 AM

What do you guys think of this? (it's a bit long, but pretty interesting).
Shelter website w/ all the info




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4/12/2011 11:19 AM

Well if this stuff really sticks to the frame as well, looks like it could be a winner. Il be placing an order to test it I think...

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4/12/2011 11:32 AM

I just got some to test. The video is pretty convincing.

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4/12/2011 11:47 AM

The description sounds awfully similar to the "X-Flex Blast Protection System" wallpaper used in army barracks. Would definatly be acquiring some of this Shelter material for my thin-tubed Trek

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4/12/2011 12:26 PM

Would like to see the hammer turned to the ball side(or better yet use an angular rock) - then test on a carbon tube to failure, then test on a protected carbon tube to failure.

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4/12/2011 12:31 PM

I agree this stuff definitely works do distribute force well, however I need to point out that the Force of the impact is dependent on how much the hammer slowed down at impact, not on how far it swung. For example, if you dropped the hammer once at a given height and it went through a piece of paper, the Force of impact would be far less than if you dropped it from the same exact height and it hit a rock. Newton's 3rd law tells us that more force will be provided only if the object you are striking provides that force. And one more note, to calculate the Kinetic Energy at the bottom of the swing, it is much more accurate to calculate Potential Energy through the equation PE = mgh with h being (length)(cos(theta)). Friction is negligible, so all of the Kinetic Energy would remain at the bottom of the swing. Your KE values will be much more accurate because you needn't try and measure time.

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4/12/2011 12:37 PM

Since when did the mountain bike industry make downtubes out of fluorescent light bulbs?

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4/12/2011 12:41 PM

Totally agree with the above mentioned posts.

1.) Light bulbs shatter upon impact, so obviously even scotch tape is going to help prevent breaking. Why not use a real downtube???

2.) The surface area of contact of the hammer is nothing like a random sharp corner of a rock.

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4/12/2011 12:42 PM

I wondering if wrapping this stuff on my chainstay will quiet my bike down? Thoughts on that?

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4/12/2011 1:13 PM

I already use something just like this from 3m and I not sure what the real term is for the stuff but be we use it in our body shop and get it on a large bulk roll and people call it rock chip guard.

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4/12/2011 2:17 PM

I'm the importer / distributor for Shelter. In reply to the various questions and comments about this stuff:

rebelssof - In fact, Shelter was developed by a former 3M engineer. In some respects it's like rock chip guard, but it is optimized for the kind of impacts you get from rocks thrown against your down tube while descending.

el Capitan - Bingo. It completely silences chain slap.

ET and Audeo03: Right. A florescent bulb isn't the same as a carbon tube. But exploding florescent bulbs make for better video. The point of the video was to show the relative difference between naked and protected in a dramatic visual manner.

FR112358: Huh? I'm not an engineer, but I got a mechanical engineer to design the test and you can see his arithmetic at our site.

JimEG, Yes we could have used the ball side of the hammer, a sharp edge of a rock, and ice skate, or a bowling pin. It wouldn't have made any difference. The point of the test was to show the RELATIVE difference between a surface protected with Shelter and one without it.

Snozzer: Trek is now supplying down tube protection on some of their DH bikes. If you don't have it though, you might want to consider Shelter.

Dogboy: Thank you. May the wind always be at your back.

Iceman2058: Remove any cable before applying. Make sure your hands are clean (or your finger prints will show) clean the frame surface, and apply. You can pull it up to readjust if you don't wait too long. After about 24 hours, Shelter is pretty difficult to remove.

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4/12/2011 6:38 PM

I agree with E.T. i'm pretty sure the force required to break a florescent bulb is MUCH less than the force to break a carbon tube. even if you put the tape on the tube, you never meet the threshold where the carbon fiber would break. maybe for florescent bulbs...

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4/12/2011 8:17 PM

Shelter is the best. Try it. I am a shop guy and I have witnessed it saving my personal rig during a crash. Perfect for downtube on shutlle bikes, saves paint and frame. Super tacky, but easily removalable. Works on stays. 100% recommended.

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4/13/2011 7:08 PM

It looks like what we used to call helicopter tape, used to protect the leading edge of helicopter blades. It's probably made by 3M and is the same as rock chip guard. It does work. Nice packaging though, and good luck.

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4/14/2011 5:18 PM

Ive got it. 2 days of shuttle runs in loose rocky terain, 2 small dents in my downtube. Im sure they would have been worse without it but I question if it is worth $30.

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8/5/2014 8:25 AM

Tomboniboi wrote:

I'm the importer / distributor for Shelter. In reply to the various questions and comments about this stuff:

rebelssof - In fact, Shelter was developed by a former 3M engineer. In some respects it's like rock chip guard, but it is optimized for the kind of impacts you get from rocks thrown against your down tube while descending.

el Capitan - Bingo. It completely silences chain slap.

ET and Audeo03: Right. A florescent bulb isn't the same as a carbon tube. But exploding florescent bulbs make for better video. The point of the video was to show the relative difference between naked and protected in a dramatic visual manner.

FR112358: Huh? I'm not an engineer, but I got a mechanical engineer to design the test and you can see his arithmetic at our site.

JimEG, Yes we could have used the ball side of the hammer, a sharp edge of a rock, and ice skate, or a bowling pin. It wouldn't have made any difference. The point of the test was to show the RELATIVE difference between a surface protected with Shelter and one without it.

Snozzer: Trek is now supplying down tube protection on some of their DH bikes. If you don't have it though, you might want to consider Shelter.

Dogboy: Thank you. May the wind always be at your back.

Iceman2058: Remove any cable before applying. Make sure your hands are clean (or your finger prints will show) clean the frame surface, and apply. You can pull it up to readjust if you don't wait too long. After about 24 hours, Shelter is pretty difficult to remove.

If it is pretty difficult to remove, how do you remove it? Will it leave a sticky goo, damage the finish of the carbon frame or ruin the decals?

I'm just thinking in advance just in case I sell my carbon frame in the future, I know what to expect.

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8/10/2014 12:27 PM

My Shelter is over 2 years old on my carbon frame. Some slight peeling up at couple corners, but that is it, so far it has done its job. If I made a new bike purchase, yup, Shelter going on it.

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