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2020 Nukeproof Mega 290 Expert Bike

“Beast of a bike ”

The Good:

Value for money

The Bad:

only a minor thing , but the external cabling on the down tube lets it down aesthetically

Overall Review: On a value for money basis , im not sure you could do better , And im not so much talking about components , more performance. I came off an opposition bike , a higher spec model , full carbon etc . $2000 more expensive .  And this Alloy Nukeproof leaves it for dead, faster , more composed in the rough, and climbs better.  I would imagine the higher spec models are better still, but if this is at your budget point, you cant go wrong, this bike is so capable and ready to race as is . 

RockShox MegNeg Upgrade Kit

Vital Review

“Even MORE Negative Volume! RockShox MegNeg Review”

Introduced alongside the Lyrik Ultimate fork and Charger 2.1 damper update, the MegNeg air can kit more than doubles today's already large negative volumes. This results in a noticeable and tunable boost of mid- and end-stroke support (and a lot more pumping). Join Vital MTB's Product Editor, Brandon Turman, in the video above, to learn how it came to be, what the tuning process is like, the upsides, downsides, and an overview of what types of mountain bikes will benefit the most from a MegNeg upgrade. MegNeg Air Can Highlights Allows you to tune negative volume with Bottomless Rings Provides 64-111% more Read More »

TIME Speciale 12 Clipless Pedal

“French Connection”

The Good:

Big, grippy platform. Super solid engagement. sheds mud, snow, and ice well. Doesn't release on rock strikes. A good amount of float. A discussion piece to have with my Dentist

The Bad:

Price...but you get what you pay for.

Overall Review: My last Time pedals lasted forever with zero maintenance, these so far have been super reliable and performance is 1st class.

Shimano PD-M647 Pedals

Featured Member Review

“One of the best bomb proof SPD pedals”

The Good:

Ultra Durable
Rebuildable (cup and cone loose ball system)
Proven SPD system
Composite Platform

The Bad:

Weight
Composite platform more slippery than metal
Composite platform can get a little loose
Cup and cone bearing system if you don't like adjusting your bike

Overall Review: In the world of products being updated every couple years, especially in the biking world, the M647/ DX hasn't been touched in a long time since it was designed so well to start. I've used these DHing, 4x/DS, and as my general trail bike pedal for years. Positives Ultra Durable Design:In both the main clipless assembly and the composite platform they are both built to be incredibly durable.  The Platform: The plastic in the cage is super burly and slippery (more on that later), much more so than the cheaper Shimano M424. These has seen tons of abuse and are still going strong. The SPD Read More »

Four Four Three Dissident Complete Wheel

Vital Review

“Tested: Four Four Three Dissident Carbon Wheelset”

There is no shortage of carbon wheel options today. Regardless of price point, you are sure to find a range of choices, from generic catalog rims to super-specialty items that cost as much as a good full suspension bike. Four Four Three is taking the middle road with the Dissident, supplying a wheel built on its own rims and hubs at a competitive price made possible by a direct sales and distribution model. We’ve been testing a pair for over a year to find out how it measures up – read on to learn more. Strengths Weaknesses Very strong rim Reliable hubs Fast engagement Good value Rims are quite stiff Tall rims Read More »

Shimano XTR M9020 Clipless Pedal

“9.5 out of 10”

The Good:

Definitive Clip-in Feel, Durable, Easy to enter and exit, adjustable clip in tension, Longevity, Set it and Forget it. I never accidentally come un-clipped

The Bad:

Expensive, Less Float and less mud/ice shedding ability than Crank Brothers, No replaceable pins, Platform not as good as Mallet or Mallet E when un-clipped.

Overall Review: I have just switched over to Shimano XTR trail pedals after having been on Crank Brothers Mallets and Mallets E s for the last 8 years or so. The Good: Light, A very Definitive Clip-in Feel, They are Durable, Easy to enter and exit, adjustable clip in tension, Price, Longevity, Set it and Forget it. I never accidentally come un-clipped like I used to with Crank Bros. The cleats are steel and last much longer than the Crank Bros Cleats.  I have not had to do ANY maintenance on them.  They seem to last forever. The Bad: High Price, they have Less Float and less mud/ice shedding ability than Crank Brothers, No replaceable pins, Platform not as good as Mallet or Mallet E when un-clipped.

Shimano M8020 Clipless Pedal

“9 out of 10”

The Good:

Definitive Clip-in Feel, Durable, Ease of entry and exit, adjustable clip in tension, Price, Longevity, Set it and Forget it.

The Bad:

Less Float and less mud/ice shedding ability than Crank Brothers, No replaceable pins, Platform not as good as Mallet or Mallet E when un-clipped.

Overall Review: I have just switched over to Shimano XT and XTR trail pedals after having been on Crank Brothers Mallets and Mallets E s for the last 8 years or so. The Good: A very Definitive Clip-in Feel, They are Durable, Easy to enter and exit, adjustable clip in tension, Price, Longevity, Set it and Forget it. I never accidentally come un-clipped like I used to with Crank Bros. The cleats are steel and last much longer than the Crank Bros Cleats.  I have not had to do ANY maintenance on them.  They seem to last forever. The Bad: They have Less Float and less mud/ice shedding ability than Crank Brothers, No replaceable pins, Platform not as good as Mallet or Mallet E when un-clipped.

Crankbrothers Mallet E Clipless Pedal

“8.5 out of 10”

The Good:

Float, Mud & Ice shedding, great for messing around with regular shoes or when you come un-clipped and need a platform until you can get clipped back in

The Bad:

Clip -in is more ambiguous than Shimano SPD, the brass cleats wear out way too quickly.

Overall Review: I have been on these pedals and the Mallets for the last 8 years or so. The Good: Float for people with knee problems or who like to move around on the bike a lot, Mud & Ice shedding, great for messing around with regular shoes or when you come un-clipped and need a platform until you can get clipped back in. The Bad: The Clip-in is more ambiguous than Shimano SPD, the brass cleats wear out way too quickly.  Some people have had durability issues.  I usually rebuild them every 2,000 miles or so.  Supposedly Shimano SPDs can go a lot longer with less mainteneance.

100% Trajecta Full Face Helmet

Vital Review

“Tested: 100% Trajecta Full Face Helmet”

Something funny happened a while back. People started shredding mid-travel, single-crown bikes pretty hard, right around the same time as the enduro racing discipline was making a name for itself on the world stage. As these bikes became ever more capable, we started going faster and harder on rougher and more difficult trails – but since we were now on single-crown bikes that can pedal, how about we ditch the full-face helmet and the armor? Makes sense, right? NOT. But nobody wants to pedal around in a hot and heavy full-face helmet, so we need something else – the lightweight, breathable full-face helmet was born. Read More »

2020 Rocky Mountain Slayer Carbon 90 29 Bike

Vital Review

“Tested: 2020 Rocky Mountain Slayer – Ready for Action”

The Rocky Mountain Slayer has been a mainstay for the Canadian brand for nearly 20 years. Throughout that time it has played the role of Rocky Mountain’s heavy-hitting trail bike, however in recent years it has fallen out of favor with many and the Altitude BC Edition became the brand's flagship enduro bike. In an effort to rekindle the magic of old, Rocky started from the ground aiming to modernize the Slayer for enduro, freeride, and park duties without sacrificing all-day endurance. To see what the new ride is capable of, we have been punishing our test rig for a few months in Squamish, BC - just up the Read More »