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​The Ibis Mojo has been through various iterations over the last few years, the latest in line being the HD3, a long-legged trail bike or even enduro machine should you wish to employ the e-word. When it came time to update the Mojo again, Ibis went back to the drawing board not with the intention of creating something visually different but rather to take a long hard look at all the new standards now available and what these might do for bike design. Perhaps not a surprise, what they came back with was a new tire size and the realization that it could help them make what they thought of as the perfect trail bike. Meet the Mojo 3.

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Ibis Mojo 3 Highlights

  • 27.5" or 27.5 Plus tire compatible with one wheel set.
  • Boost 148 rear/Boost 110 front
  • 130 mm rear wheel travel
  • dw-link version 5
  • 1X or 2X with a removable direct mount front derailleur mount that gives a clean 1X look
  • 27.5+ compatible with Schwalbe or Maxxis 2.8”
  • Sizes: Small, Medium, Large, Extra Large
  • Fox Factory FLOAT DPS shock with EVOL Sleeve and Kashima Coat, 7.875" x 2.00"
  • ISCG 05 compatible with optional removable adapter
  • Carbon fiber monocoque frame and swingarm
  • 68 mm BSA threaded bottom bracket
  • Super versatile internal cable routing including internal dropper routing
  • Optional polycarbonate down tube cable guard
  • 160mm post mount
  • Headset compatibility: ZS 44 / ZS 56
  • Seatpost diameter: 31.6mm
  • Dual row angular contact bearings on the drive side of the lower link that have less play than standard sealed bearings. Preload adjustment is not necessary. Large 28mm x 15mm x 7mm radial bearings on the non drive side for stiffness and long wear
  • Frame weight 5.5 lbs with shock (size medium)
  • BB height at sag is the same with either tire

Starting with the obvious, the Mojo 3 is clearly an Ibis. In fact, at first glance, you might think it's just a regular old HD3 or HDR frame. However, those fatter wheels give it away: this is a new beast entirely. When Ibis went about testing all the new wheelsizes, they came to the conclusion that there is a sweet spot at around 2.8 inches wide for a 27.5" tire, which offers the extra grip and the benefits of running lower pressures associated with Plus-sized tires, but without much penalty in terms of rolling resistance and more importantly without any of the bounciness you might find in a 3.0 or bigger tire. Also, by limiting themselves to a 2.8 tire and employing the new Boost standard, they could shorten the chainstays down to a mere 425-mm without sacrificing clearance or even the front derailleur. Yes, the Mojo 3 will work with 2x shifting for those who need it.

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The DW-link suspension pumps out 130 millimeters of travel out back, which Ibis says corresponds to the needs of the vast majority of riders out there. They also say that with plus-sized tires, it feels like there is more on tap. The short stays coupled with a 66.8-degree head angle should make this a capable ride, we'll say that much without actually having ridden one.

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So are Ibis saying that plus-size is the way to go, take it or leave it? Far from it, they are actually offering the new Mojo 3 with a choice of tires: a 2.8 plus tire, the new 2.5 WT Minion DHF from Maxxis, or regular 2.3-2.4 options as well - all on the same rim. Because the bigger tires will sag more (if you run them as intended at a low 15-17 psi), Ibis claims that at sag, BB height is not affected by your choice of tires. Run the Plus option for max traction and forgiveness, or go to a regular 27.5" tire for super muddy conditions or for sharper handling. The secret ingredient here is Ibis' own 35-mm internal width 741 rims, which they introduced some time ago already in response to (or was that to cause?) the latest wide-rim revolution.

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If the bike runs 27.5+, surely it will take a 29" wheel too? Not so. As outlined above, Ibis discovered a sweet spot around 2.8" wide tires, and all the tires they liked best during testing had profiles lower than that of a regular 29" tire. The choice was made to make the Mojo 3 27.5 regular and 27.5+ compatible, and to stop there. As we also already mentioned, this left Ibis the possibility to shrink the chain stays down to a very short 425-mm.

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Continuing the overview, the frame shares many aspects with its HD3 bigger brother, such as internal cable routing and the ability to run a bottle cage in the front triangle. Improvements in carbon layup technology has reduced the weight even further, down to a svelte 2500 grams for a medium sized frame with shock. On the topic of the shock, FOX's Evol (Extra Volume) can is there to give the bike a plush and linear feel. Thankfully, Ibis did not blindly adopt EVERY new standard out there, leaving us with a much-appreciated 68-mm threaded BB instead of some creaky pressfit job. Stand-over clearance has been improved on the Mojo 3, which the rest of the geo numbers are pretty much par for the all-mountain course these day. Reach is not particularly long, and the wheelbase is kept on the shorter side thanks to the short stays and the relatively steep head angle. The effective seat tube angle is not as steep as it could be on paper, but we'll reserve judgment on the numbers until we've actually test ridden the bike.

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Ibis Mojo 3 Geometry (with 140-mm FOX 34 Fork)

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Ibis Mojo 3 Build Kits

The Ibis Mojo 3 is available as a frame + shock combo at $2999 USD, or as one of several complete bike build kit options starting from $3999 USD. Below are 2 examples, the X01 kit at $6199 and XT 1X Werx at $7399. More options are available at www.ibiscycles.com or at your Ibis dealer.

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The Mojo 3 is available as of today, check with your local dealer or head on over to www.ibiscycles.com for more information.

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