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MTB Shoes

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7/2/2014 9:13 PM
Edited Date/Time: 7/3/2014 12:24 PM

Hey everyone, I am just getting into mountain biking and have a question. I was wondering if the Fly mountain bike shoes are any good. I want a good pair of mountain bike shoes but don't want to spend an arm and a leg. Any opinions would help, thank you.

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7/3/2014 12:14 PM

Are you referring to the Talon RS/Talon II? I don't have direct experience, but appear to be around the same quality as similar priced XC shoes. If you plan to ride XC, then give them a go, and report back in 6 months. If you plan to DH, I would recommend something with a more secure toe box.

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Race Mojo Wheels | Read VitalMTB

7/3/2014 12:20 PM
Edited Date/Time: 7/3/2014 12:37 PM

One feature that is key for me, is a softer rubber on the cleats. That rubber needs to grip bare rock. Some shoes have a hard plastic that makes bare rock slip like ice - and it will change your decision to try technical bits if you can't count on your shoe sticking.

Shimano has the rubber on the cleats. A few others do as well. Those Talons above look to have plastic cleats.
Here is what the rubberized cleats look like:
http://www.racycles.com/assets/productimages/large/Shimano_SH_M162_Sole.jpg

Try on in a shop - and buy at that shop. Don't try to buy shoes online. I've done it and came up short.

P

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7/3/2014 12:23 PM

Just for the same of comparison, the SH-XC50N from Shimano is almost identical but retails for a couple bucks more. Unless we happen across someone who has owned both (or similar), you'll have to take a chance.

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Race Mojo Wheels | Read VitalMTB

7/3/2014 12:28 PM

Mr. P wrote:

One feature that is key for me, is a softer rubber on the cleats. That rubber needs to grip bare rock. Some shoes have a hard ...more

Agreed. I had a pair of SixSixOne Flight XC, and although they were light, they were horrible for any hike-a-bike on actual rock.

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Race Mojo Wheels | Read VitalMTB

7/3/2014 2:30 PM

I haven't ridden that shoe exactly but many like it and found that they work just fine. Fly has always made pretty durable products in my experience. Hopefully you have tried this shoe on an know that it fits well before purchasing it. If you are new to clip in pedals , go slow and enjoy the added power of climbing and always having you foot in the right spot when you are looking to put the power down. Make sure you are comfortable popping out when the trail isn't so nice to you and you find yourself stopped and weighting the front corner of the bikesmile They are a great upgrade and I think you'll really like them. Within $20 I'm sure you can find any brands similar offering with lots of feature for the $. Go with a known vendor. I've gotten shoes from Jenson and had a good experience. Right now I'm running the M-162 shimano and had the Mavic Alpine XL before these. Like Mr.P comments above, I like the rubberized sole so that when my foot pops out and I still need to pedal I'm not trying to stand on hard plastic that feels like ice on the pedal. GET A RUBERIZED SOLE NOT PLASTIC!

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7/3/2014 9:23 PM

If you are just getting into MTB...........then my advice to you is:
Run flat pedals with normal shoes

(I know this is a "controversial" statement with xc crowd - but that is what I would suggest for a complete beginner)

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7/4/2014 5:17 AM

I don't know if OP is coming back, but I just remembered my first shoes were flats, but then I started clipping in with Specialized Tahoes.

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Race Mojo Wheels | Read VitalMTB

7/4/2014 11:52 AM

I would have to say that fit is the most important factor. Way more important than price, every shoe fits differently, and chances are there is a great fitting shoe out there in your budget.

I agree with T-Dawg. If you have the basics down then clipless is the next step, but if you are super new to mountain biking then flats are the best, at least until you have some skills built up.

I have the Giro Terraduro right now and absolutely love them for everything, rubber sole, great fit (for me), but at $180 might be a little pricey.

Plastic lugs aren't the greatest, but if you live in a place where walking on solid rock, or wet roots is unlikely then it might work fine, they do last a long time.

If you do try on in a shop, support the shop

My advice though, Fit is key. It is the most important factor in buying shoes. If an extra $10-$20 means loving your shoes, then do it. Good shoes will last several seasons.

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