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REVIEW: Race Face Conspiracy Wet Weather Gear 1

Waterproof and durable outer shells to keep the elements at bay, plus dual-layer gloves and a water-resistant jersey to keep you charging through the wet months.

REVIEW: Race Face Conspiracy Wet Weather Gear

For those of us in the northern hemisphere, we are in the thick of our saturated and chilly riding season. While some might be hanging up their bikes for other winter activities, proper wet weather gear is vital for those wanting to brave the elements and keep the wheels spinning year-round. Based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Race Face is no stranger to winter riding conditions. We would argue it doesn’t get much gnarlier than trying to ride the vertical, rooty and rock-slab-infested trails on the North Shore with any amount of moisture present. To make winter riders a more enjoyable experience, Race Face developed their Conspiracy line of waterproof and breathable gear to keep the elements out and your body dry. We hate being wet and cold just about as much as flat tires and bent derailleur hangers. Over the past few months, we spent time riding in rain, sleet, snow and mud to see if the Conspiracy gear could keep us stoked to ride regardless of the weather forecast. 

Race Face Conspiracy Jacket Highlights

Race Face Conspiracy DWR LS Jersey Highlights

Race Face Conspiracy Pants Highlights

  • 3-layer waterproof fabric with bonded seams and a 10,000mm water column rating
  • Very breathable with a moisture vapor permeability of 10,000gsm/24hr
  • Bonded rubber overlay elbow patches for added durability
  • Tailored fit
  • Waterproof, full-length front zipper 
  • Internal, welded left chest pocket to fit small items
  • Elasticated wrist cuffs, hood and hem for a clean finish that keeps the elements out
  • The hood is slightly oversized to fit over a helmet
  • Open ventilation under the arms exhaust heat  
  • Offered in men’s sizing only
  • MSRP: $159.00 - 212.00 USD
  • Lightweight nylon-spandex blend fabric offers mobility, durability and breathability
  • C6 DWR (durable water repellent) coating provides wind and water resistance  
  • Tailored fit designed to match riding position with a dropped back hem
  • Bonded rubber overlay elbow patches for added durability
  • Intended for wet and warm days where a rain jacket would be overkill
  • Offered in men’s sizing only
  • MSRP: $98.00 USD 
  • 3-layer waterproof fabric with 15,000mm water column rating and a nylon-blend outer fabric with a wind and water-resistant DWR coating
  • Very breathable with a moisture vapor permeability of 10,000gsm/24hr
  • Bonded seams and waterproof zippers keep moisture and mud out
  • Front ratchet closure system with inner waistband silicone print for a no-slip fit 
  • Raised rear waistband for additional coverage and an optimal on-bike fit
  • Two zippered side pockets on the thigh
  • Zippered fly
  • Offered in men’s sizing only
  • MSRP: $180.00 USD

Race Face Conspiracy Shorts Highlights

Race Face Conspiracy Gloves Highlights

Race Face Stash Gear Bag Highlights

  • 3-layer waterproof fabric with 15,000mm water column rating and a nylon-blend outer fabric with a wind and water-resistant DWR coating
  • Very breathable with a moisture vapor permeability of 10,000gsm/24hr
  • Bonded seams and waterproof zippers keep moisture and mud out
  • Front ratchet closure system with inner waistband silicone print for a no-slip fit 
  • Raised rear waistband for additional coverage and an optimal on-bike fit
  • Two zippered side pockets on the thigh
  • Zippered fly
  • Inseam: 14.5-15.5-inches (37-38.5cm)
  • Offered in men’s sizing only
  • MSRP: $160.00 USD
  • Waterproof outer layer with DWR coating 
  • Thermal inside layer 
  • Bonded and waterproof cuff to keep the elements out
  • Hook and loop wrist closure 
  • Silicone print on middle and index finger for added grip on levers in wet conditions
  • Touch screen compatible stitching on thumb 
  • Reflective print on the back of hand for improved visibility 
  • Offered in uniesex sizes
  • MSRP: $49.00 USD
  • Constructed from PVC tarpaulin material with three main compartments
  • Provides both shoulder straps and duffle handles
  • Fleece-lined goggle pocket 
  • Waterproof side pocket with drainage holes for muddy gear or shoes
  • Waterproof changing mat that doubles as a bag for wet gear
  • The other side pocket is large enough to fit most helmets
  • Three zippered pockets inside the main compartment to organize small items
  • MSRP: $83.00 USD

Initial Impressions

All the base layers in the world won’t do you much good without an outer shell to keep you dry. The Conspiracy jacket is Race Face’s most robust rain jacket and the only one with a level of waterproofing. Constructed from a 3-layer waterproof fabric with bonded seams and waterproof zippers throughout, the Conspiracy jacket is rated to a 10,000mm water column rating and a 10,000gsm/24hr breathability rating. What do those ratings mean? There are various tests that brands can put fabrics through to determine waterproof and breathability ratings. The waterproof rating is generally determined by placing a 1-inch by 1-inch square tube of water over the fabric and measuring (in millimeters) at what height the water in the column begins to penetrate the fabric. For example, the Conspiracy jacket can withstand a 10,000mm (33-foot) column of water before it begins letting water seep through. We, too, enjoy picturing this test being conducted but don’t understand how it translates to withstanding buckets of rain while trudging up a slippery climb. What you do need to know is that a 10,000mm waterproof rating is sufficient and will withstand moderate to intense rain for much longer than most riders will be out riding. The breathability of a fabric is measured by how much water vapor (measured in grams) a fabric will let escape through one square meter of fabric over 24 hours. The Conspiracy jacket will allow 10,000-grams of water to travel through the fabric over 24-hours. Yet another measurement that has its limitations when applied to real-world stresses, all riders need to know is the Conspiracy jacket provides an adequate amount of moisture to escape through the jacket as your body heats up. There are also ventilation openings under the arms to allow additional heat to escape.

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Right out of the bag, one of the standout characteristics of the Conspiracy jacket was the texture and thickness of the 3-layer fabric that screams durability and abrasion-resistance. Too often, rain jackets can feel delicate and thin, which usually doesn’t fair well after your first visit with the ground. Race Face knows that crashing during winter is likely to happen and chose to add additional bonded-rubber patches on the elbows for increased protection. The Conspiracy jacket has a tailored cut and falls close to your body without any unwanted bunching, while the wrist cuffs, hem and hood are all elasticated to keep the elements out. The hood is also large enough to fit over most trail helmets. Finally, the Conspiracy jacket has only one pocket located inside the jacket over the left chest and is just big enough to fit a smartphone. 

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The Conspiracy DWR long sleeve jersey is intended for warm and wet days where a rain jacket would be too hot and overkill for the conditions. However, we feel the Conspiracy DWR LS jersey is a must-have piece of gear for shoulder season riding. Made from a lightweight nylon-spandex blend fabric with a C6 DWR coating, the Conspiracy DWR jersey is light, breathable, stretchy and wind and water-resistant. On cooler days with a thin base layer underneath, the jersey helps fight the cold and leaves you prepared if any minor weather is forecasted. Like the Conspiracy jacket, the jersey has a tailored fit but with a drop-tail back for additional coverage when bent over in a riding position. Race Face also equipped the Conspiracy DWR jersey with bonded rubber patches over the elbows for added durability. The $98.00 USD price tag might shy some riders away, but for those who have wet trails in the fall and spring, you will appreciate having a lighter jersey with wind and water resistance.    

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When conditions turn exceptionally wet, nothing beats having actual waterproof pants to keep your legs and knee pads from being waterlogged after the first puddle explosion. Race Face’s Conspiracy pants can handle a serious soaking, featuring a 3-layer fabric with a 15,000mm water column rating and a nylon-blend outer fabric with a wind and water-resistant DWR coating. Additional waterproofing is ensured via bonded seams and waterproof zippers on the two thigh pockets and fly. But all the waterproofing in the world isn’t going to do much good at keeping you dry if the pants don’t let some sweat out. Not to worry, the Conspiracy pants have a moisture vapor permeability of 10,000gsm/24hr to help dissipate body heat and moisture. 

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The standout feature of the Conspiracy pants is the articulated cut and raised rear waistband that provides exceptional coverage and compliments a bent-over riding position for excellent comfort and mobility. The 3-layer fabric is not the stretchiest, but this never became an issue due to the optimized fit. Keeping the Conspiracy pants in place is a front ratchet closure system plus silicone print on the inside of the waistband to limit slipping. 

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The Conspiracy shorts are essentially the same as the Conspiracy pants but with less coverage for days when some added breathability is desired. They use the same 3-layer fabric with a 15,000mm water column rating and a nylon-blend outer fabric with a wind and water-resistant DWR coating, plus boded seams and waterproof zippers. The Conspiracy shorts have a roomy leg opening to accommodate most knee pads and feature a 14.5-15.5-inch inseam (37-38.5cm), depending on size.

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We can’t count how many ripping descents have been ruined due to uncomfortably cold hands and frozen fingertips that not only make it hard to operate our brakes but take away our focus from the trail ahead. If you ride when it’s below 45-degrees ( 7-degrees Celsius), you should invest in waterproof and insulated gloves. No questions asked. Race Face’s Conspiracy gloves are an excellent option and classic execution of winter bike gloves, featuring a waterproof outer layer with a wind and water-resistant DWR coating plus a thermal inner layer. As you might assume, the outer layer protects your hands from any weather while the insulted inner layer provides warmth. The cuff is also waterproof and extends past your wrist to keep dirt or water from working its way into the gloves. Final features of the Conspiracy gloves include a hook and loop wrist closure, silicone print on the middle and index finger for added lever grip in wet conditions, touch screen compatible stitching on the thumbs and reflective print on the back of the hand.   

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Race Face’s Stash gear bag is one of those items that you didn’t know you needed until it was part of your arsenal. There is nothing worst than forgetting riding gear or having to delicately place wet and muddy gear in your car after a winter ride. The Stash gear bag eliminates both of these problems with more than enough room to neatly pack multiple sets of gear, a pair of shoes, a helmet, goggles and snacks. Plus, it features a waterproof compartment for post-ride gear storage. The bag is made from highly durable and water-resistant PCV tarpaulin and can be carried as a duffle bag or backpack. For years, we’ve seen moto bags feature a removable changing mat to make getting ready in the dirt a clean and easy process. Race Face decided to raise the bar one notch higher and designed the fold-out matt in the Stash gear bag to double as a velcro-sealed bag to store exceptionally wet pieces of gear. 

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On The Trail

We tested Race Face’s Conspiracy line between October and December in Boise, Idaho. Late fall and early winter can bring a variety of weather to the treasure valley. This year was filled with sporadic rain and snowstorms followed by relatively warm temperatures between systems. Temperatures tested in ranged from 35 to 55 degrees (2 to 12 degrees Celsius), with trail conditions varying from dry, tacky, muddy, saturated and frozen. Race Face only offers their Conspiracy line in men’s sizing (except for the Conspiracy gloves, which are offered in unisex sizing). We chose to have both a male and female rider test the Conspiracy gear so that women in the market for new rain gear have a reference for how the Conspiracy line will fit. 

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Conspiracy Jacket

Jason's Impressions 

Since Race Face’s Conspiracy jacket is purely a waterproof outer shell with no insulation, I was most interested in how well the jacket would protect my insulating base layers from moisture. While the 10,000mm waterproof rating is fairly average for an athletic rain jacket, I was repeatedly impressed by the jacket’s ability to keep me dry over two months of foul weather riding. This includes withstanding five washing machine cycles with no change in water resistance. Most of my test rides were an hour long with 30 to 45 minutes of rain. However, in the spirit of product testing, I chased a few local storms and was able to conduct a handful of two-hour-plus rides with consistent precipitation in the form of rain, sleet and snow. In my experience, the two-hour mark is typically when 10,000mm waterproof rated fabrics become permeable to water. Not the Conspiracy jacket. The 3-layer waterproof fabric punches above its weight and has made the Conspiracy jacket my go-to outer shell for dark days on the bike. Even during snow flurries that left snow collecting on the jacket, I never experienced any moisture seeping through. The elasticated cuffs were another great water and wind-resistant feature that created an excellent seal to keep the elements from penetrating the sleeves of my base layers.

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The Conspiracy jacket might have easily protected me from plenty of winter weather, but the jacket’s breathability fell short of my expectations. We all operate at different body temperatures and I tend to run hot when riding. Throughout testing, the Conspiracy jacket was on the warmer side and required me to precisely pick base layers to match conditions and avoid overheating, sweating and becoming cold. The limited body heat management was more drastic when climbing and I often would reach the top of climbs nice and steamy. The thicker and more durable fabric Race Face constructed the Conspiracy jacket from did withstand two slide-outs without issue. However, I would happily opt for a more fragile garment in return for a fabric with a higher breathability rating. Again, we all operate at different temperatures and for some riders, the added heat trapped by the Conspiracy jacket could be a good thing if you run on the colder side. 

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Lauren's Impressions

The Conspiracy jacket held its own on the trail when put to the test against Boise, Idaho’s wettest conditions, plus a few visits to the ground. The jacket performed flawlessly as an outer waterproof layer and kept me dry and warm during multiple hour-long rain rides. None of my base layers fell victim to water seeping through and I found the Conspiracy jacket remained waterproof longer than most jackets I’ve ridden in. The durability of the rugged 3-layer fabric earns the Conspiracy jacket some brownie points from a common crasher like me. The rubber patches on the elbows took the brunt of a few slide-outs yet never showed any signs of wear, which gave me peace of mind knowing the jacket could handle some abuse. The only downside of the thicker and more robust construction is the limited body heat management. Even though I tend to get cold quicker than most and like jackets that hold in my heat, I found myself getting hot during climbs even with the built-in armpit ventilation. 

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I typically wear medium jackets in women’s sizing for a more relaxed fit. Race Face does not offer the Conspiracy jacket in women’s sizing, so I chose a size small jacket per their sizing guide. For the most part, the jacket fit nice and secure due to the elasticated cuffs, hood and hem. The arms were a little long, but this never bothered me when riding. My biggest complaint with the fit of the Conspiracy jacket was the lack of a drop tail hem to keep mud from getting into the waist of my pants. Overall, the Conspiracy jacket performed excellent as a durable rain barrier and is the jacket I find myself reaching for first on the coldest days as it is warmer than my other rain shells.

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Conspiracy DWR LS Jersey

Jason's Impressions

As mentioned above, the Conspiracy DWR jersey is designed for warm and wet riding days. While I believe the jersey would be epic during summer downpours, I found its functionality matched perfectly with cool, damp conditions. I wore the DWR jersey from October to December and the warmest day was around 55 degrees (12 degrees Celsius). More often than not, I wore the jersey when it was 35-45 degrees (2-7 degrees Celsius) outside. On days when a chance of moderate rain was expected but wasn’t going to be significant enough to warrant the weight and heat of the Conspiracy jacket, the DWR jersey was a perfect option. The C6 DWR coating did a fantastic job repelling rain and muddy water and kept me dry during multiple short-lasted downpours. I also loved how well the DWR coating helped block wind chill. The fabric is impressively stretchy, making it easy to wear a thin base layer underneath for added warmth. Since the DWR jersey is still very thin and light, I didn’t have any breathability issues as I did with the Conspiracy jacket. The last detail I loved with the DWR jersey was the dropped back hem, which kept mud flung up from the rear wheel from getting underneath the jersey.

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Lauren's Impressions

The Conspiracy DWR jersey was a lifesaver during the windiest rides this fall. When it was too warm for the Conspiracy jacket, but there was wind and light moisture in the forecast, I opted for the DWR jersey over any other piece of gear I own. The C6 DWR coating functioned as designed and allowed the material to bead and repel water impressively well. I usually wore the jersey with a base layer underneath for added warmth. On a few warmer days, I did wear the DWR jersey by itself and was impressed by how incredibly light, soft and comfortable the material was. Like the Conspiracy jacket, I went with a size small men’s DWR jersey since Race Face does not offer the jersey in women’s specific sizing. The size small fit me a little big and long and led me to tuck in the extra material for a better fit. The baggy fit was less bothersome when worn with a thin base layer underneath. Overall, the durability, water-resistance and lightweight construction of the DWR jersey make it my new go-to top for cool days when I know some weather is likely. 

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Conspiracy Pants

Jason's Impressions

Just as I loved the waterproof capabilities of the Conspiracy jacket, the Conspiracy pants performed flawlessly against the elements. During all my test rides, I never had any water seep through and enjoyed how the cut of the legs from the knee down was a little baggier, allowing water splashed up from puddles to run off over my shoes, not down into my socks. Just like the Conspiracy jacket, I washed the pants five times and did not notice any degrading water-resistant performance from the fabric or the DWR coating. 

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Beyond keeping me completely dry, the articulated cut of the Conspiracy pants was a standout characteristic. If you hold the pants up, they naturally curve at the hips and knees to match a bent-over, squatted riding position. On the trail, this translated to suburb knee and hip mobility regardless of the limited elasticity of the fabric. I never had any uncomfortable material bunching at my knees or crotch and appreciated the maximum mud protection provided by the high rear waist panel.

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The Conspiracy pants share the same 10,000gsm/24hr breathability rating as the Conspiracy jacket and were equally hot. During most rides, I would begin sweating within 30-minutes of pedaling and could feel the lack of ventilation exhausting my body heat. While you can unzip a jacket to cool down mid-ride, ripping off your pants is a little bolder. But don’t let me stop you if that is what you’re into! Despite being hot when climbing and pedaling, I am more willing to put up with the heat as long as my pants keep my butt, legs and knee pads safe from weather and mud. Plus, I typically notice my upper body beginning to overheat and zap my energy much faster than my lower extremities. For that reason, I persevered through the warmth of the Conspiracy pants to reap its water protection qualities.

Lauren's Impressions

The Conspiracy pants are top-notch, durable and completely waterproof, making them ideal for the most sloppy and frigid conditions. Since I tend to run colder than most riders, I found the lightweight fabric plenty breathable, allowing unwanted heat to escape while still protecting my legs from the elements. At the same time, the pants have held up against a few crashes with nothing more to show than some extra mud spread across my side. Conveniently, the waterproof fabric takes only moments to hose off and the Conspiracy pants are equipped with a pant loop for hang drying. The pant leg opening is reinforced with a rubber patch on the inside of the legs to protect against wear while riding. As someone who tends to have small slide-outs more often when riding in wet conditions, I am personally a big fan of the reinforced patches found across the whole Conspiracy line.  

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I have a 26-inch waist and 32-inch inseam and typically wear a small or medium in women’s sizing, depending on brand, style and fit. I again wore a men’s size small and was pleased by the relaxed fit of the Conspiracy pants that easily accommodated a base layer or knee pads. I had to run the ratchet closure almost completely closed to fit my waist, but the pants’ length was spot on and ended right at my ankles. The Conspiracy shorts, on the other hand, while still a men’s size small just like the pants, fit me like a pair of classic JNCO jeans. The inseam was too long and the leg openings too big, making the shorts irrelevant for me to test. 

Conspiracy Shorts

Jason's Impressions

I only wore the Conspiracy shorts on one ride simply because temperatures were too cold and wet this fall. I’ve owned a few pairs of waterproof shorts in the past and usually save them for days over 60-degrees (15 degrees Celsius) when I prioritize breathability over remaining completely dry. A perfect example would be an all-day spring adventure where pants would be too hot, but I want my shorts to keep my butt from becoming a soggy mess during hours in the saddle. The Conspiracy shorts are longer than shorts I typically ride in and fall just below my knee caps. The knee opening is also on the large side, which is great for accommodating bulky knee pads but did make the shorts feel awfully baggy. Even though the size large shorts did fit my waist comfortably, I would be interested in trying a size medium to see if the inseam is shorter and the leg opening narrower to achieve a more athletic fit. Hopefully, come spring, I will be able to log more time in the Conspiracy shorts when conditions are more appropriate.

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Conspiracy Gloves

Jason's Impressions

My hand circulation is absolutely terrible. Maybe it’s a product of growing up in Southern California or it’s just genetic. Still, it doesn’t take weather much colder than 50 degrees (10 degrees Celsius) for me to toss on insulated winter gloves. Luckily, the Conspiracy gloves checked all my needs for cold weather gloves and kept my hands toasty warm during multiple storms and snow flurries. The DWR coating on the outside might not be waterproof, but after two months of testing and multiple wash cycles, the gloves have continuously kept water from reaching the inner insulating layer. Beyond keeping my mitts toasty warm, there were two aspects of the Conspiracy gloves that I really enjoyed. First, they have a high enough wrist cuff to extend under the end of your jacket. This limits any skin from being exposed to the elements between the glove and jacket cuff and stops water from sneaking into the gloves. Second, the wrist features a hook and loop closure to keep the gloves in place. Many dual-layer, insulated mountain bike gloves are just a simple slip-on design. I’m not a fan of this design because I tend to feel my hands moving between the inner and outer layers of the glove. The Conspiracy gloves remained tight and secure, and I found that I had a more direct connection with my handlebar and controls at all times. 

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Lauren's Impressions 

The Conspiracy gloves’ waterproofing and dual-layer construction make them an excellent option for maximizing warmth during the winter months. My hands typically go numb during the early stages of a cold ride. With the Conspiracy gloves, I consistently lasted longer on rides with feeling in my hands. My hands still succumbed to the cold on most rides below 45 degrees (7 degrees Celsius), but I think that is more of a personal problem that I’m not going to hold against the gloves. I didn’t have any water make its way inside the gloves on exceptionally wet rides and enjoyed the palm material that provided plenty of grip even when wet. The bonded cuffs and wrist closures were also a nice touch that kept the gloves from looking too bulky against my smaller arms and allowed the glove cuff to mesh well with the cuff of my jacket. As for fitment, I usually wear small women’s gloves, so I went with x-small Conspiracy gloves based on the unisex sizing and they fit perfectly. 

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Things That Could Be Improved 

We were pleased with the waterproofing ability and fitment of the whole Conspiracy line. We expressed our yearns for more breathability with the jacket and pants, but body temperature regulation is a factor that is particular to each person. For us, the Conspiracy jacket and pants will be our go-to gear choice when temperatures are on the colder side. The Conspiracy jacket is the only piece of gear in the lineup we would like to see two minor changes made. First, who doesn’t love pockets? The single internal chest pocket on the Conspiracy jacket was practical for carrying a phone or car keys, but there is no additional storage beyond that. We would love to see extra zippered exterior pockets added to stash gloves or glasses when climbing. Second, the hem of the jersey does not feature a drop tail and is on the shorter side all around, which allows mud to get inside the jacket. When worn over the Conspiracy DWR jersey, the jersey actually extends below the jacket. The Conspiracy jacket functions wonderfully as a waterproof outer shell. A few centimeters added to the hem would ensure there is no chance any elements will work their way inside the jacket.  

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Long Term Durability 

After months of testing and multiple crashes, we experience no failures, rips or tears in any pieces of Conspiracy gear. The 3-layer fabric used on the Conspiracy jacket, pants and shorts has some of the highest abrasion resistance of any rain gear we’ve ridden. There are also no areas that have us concerned about the longevity of the gear and we feel confident everything will hold up for many winters to come.  

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What's The Bottom Line?

Race Face nailed the waterproofing and durability of their Conspiracy wet weather gear line. When conditions turn south and you need outer layers to cut wind and repel water, the Conspiracy jacket, pants and shorts are guaranteed to keep you dry for hours on the trail. The DWR LS jersey is ideal for shoulder season rides, offering some water protection without the bulky commitment of a rain jacket. And rounding out the line, the Conspiracy gloves provide the warmth and water protection expected from dual-layer gloves without feeling bulky or limiting dexterity. The biggest factor riders should consider when deciding if Race Face’s Conspiracy gear is right for them is how much breathability they require from their waterproof gear. The Conspiracy line leaves some heat management to be desired and, for this reason, is best suited for exceptionally crisp days in the saddle with lots of precipitation forecasted. 

For more information on Race Face's Conspiracy line of wet weather gear, please head to www.raceface.com.

View key specs, compare products, and rate the latest from Race Face in the Vital MTB Product Guide.


About The Reviewer

Jason Schroeder - Age: 26 // Years Riding MTB: 15 // Height: 6' (1.8m) // Weight: 165-pounds (74.8kg)

A once-upon-a-time World Cup downhill racer turned desk jockey, Jason has spent years within the bicycle industry from both sides of the tape. A fan of all-day adventures in the saddle or flowing around a bowl at the skatepark, he doesn't discriminate from any form of two-wheel riding. Originally a SoCal native now residing in Boise, Idaho, you can find Jason camped out in his van most weekends at any given trailhead in the greater Pacific Northwest.


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