2019 Marin Alpine Trail 8

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2019 Marin Alpine Trail 8  2019 Marin Alpine Trail 8
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Riding the 2019 Marin Alpine Trail - Made for Fun

Incredible times on an incredibly well priced long-travel 29er from Marin. Check out the all-new Alpine Trail.

Riding the 2019 Marin Alpine Trail - Made for Fun

The phrase “Made for Fun” is written somewhere on all of Marin’s bikes, their steadfast mantra. It is an ideology emphasized in the brand’s catalog, as there are no “filler” bikes or wonky in-betweeners, just fun shred-ready bikes that stack the ratio of smiles per mile. The ethos of the re-birthed Marin keeps the focus tight and on track, which is paramount when reshaping a 32-year-old company with roots firmly planted in the humble beginnings of mountain biking. Fresh and progressive, but sensible and smart would be a good way to describe the designs. For 2019, Marin has gone ahead and doubled down on these concepts and created the Alpine Trail, a 29er trail bike designed to cover riders from ripping around the local singletrack to blasting down high alpine ridge lines.

On the last day of

The phrase “Made for Fun” is written somewhere on all of Marin’s bikes, their steadfast mantra. It is an ideology emphasized in the brand’s catalog, as there are no “filler” bikes or wonky in-betweeners, just fun shred-ready bikes that stack the ratio of smiles per mile. The ethos of the re-birthed Marin keeps the focus tight and on track, which is paramount when reshaping a 32-year-old company with roots firmly planted in the humble beginnings of mountain biking. Fresh and progressive, but sensible and smart would be a good way to describe the designs. For 2019, Marin has gone ahead and doubled down on these concepts and created the Alpine Trail, a 29er trail bike designed to cover riders from ripping around the local singletrack to blasting down high alpine ridge lines.

On the last day of Crankworx in Les Gets I met up with the Marin folks, John Oldale (International Marketing), Chris Holmes (Brand Director), and Matt Cipes (MTB Product Manager), as well as two Marin athletes, Veronique Sandler and Nikki Whiles. John, Vero, Nikki, Roo Fowler (photographer) and I all went out for a group ride on one of the local tracks in Les Gets to give the big wheeled shred sled a proper shakedown. Click play to learn a bit about Marin's current direction, the bike's development, and key details that stand out:

2019 Marin Alpine Trail Highlights

  • 29-inch wheels
  • 150mm (5.9-inches) rear travel // 160mm (6.3-inches) front travel
  • Series 4 aluminum frame
  • MultiTrac suspension platform with one-piece rocker link
  • Bridgeless seatstay
  • Coil shock compatible
  • Full internal cable routing
  • Deep seatpost insertion across all sizes
  • Chainstay mounted post mount disc brake
  • 148x12mm Boost thru-axle
  • 73mm threaded bottom bracket with ISCG05 tabs

Geometry

Suspension Kinematics

Leverage Ratio
Anti-Rise
Anti-Squat with 30-tooth ring
Anti-Squat with 32-tooth ring

On The Trail

I was rocking the size large Alpine Trail 8 with my personal flat pedals bolted on, everything else was “as is” regarding how the bike would be sold. Vero was also on the Alpine Trail 8, with John and Nikki sporting the Rift Zone and Attack Trail, respectively. As we journeyed across the hill to the trailhead, I anticipated having to get used to the fresh steed… which I’m glad I didn’t stress about, as I was immediately comfortable on the bike. The Alpine Trail 8 easily passed both the wheelie and manual test – which isn't always the case with long-travel 29ers.

I didn’t have any expectations going into the ride, but I certainly wouldn’t have predicted that I’d be so in tune with the bike that I might as well have been aboard my personal ride. The planted feeling from geometry and playfulness from the suspension struck that magic balance of handling.

Manual test, passed.

Gotta earn your turns.
The candid band photo.

Genuine stoke!

Going up was just as easy, the neutral seated position, overall wheelbase, and balance of the bike kept the traction on high and the front wheel down. Two of the steepest climbs in the valley happened to be on this ride, and both were cleaned with ease – one standing, one seated. It was impressive.

After taking a requisite admiration-of-the-view-at-the-top stop for Instagram, we dove right into the fun part of the ride. Taking off down the trail, I had the goal in mind of just riding the bike and seeing what would happen – I didn’t ask about the Alpine at all before we headed out, as I didn’t want to color my first impressions of the bike. After a little bit of descending, we pulled up to wait for Roo who had stopped for some shots and John asked, “So what do you think?” to which I said, “I don’t have to think, this bike just does!” That is to say, the characteristics of the bike are so well combined, the level of predictability and feel of the bike are incredibly intuitive. I didn’t have any expectations going into the ride, but I certainly wouldn’t have predicted that I’d be so in tune with the bike that I might as well have been aboard my personal ride. The planted feeling from geometry and playfulness from the suspension struck that magic balance of handling.

Dropping in!
Diving into the rough.
Great view, great bike.

The remainder of the ride continued to be inspired and fast, with the big wheels and dialed suspension tune eating all the root chatter and paving the holes. Pulling for little gaps and monster-trucking were frequent, as were my shouts of stoke from behind the bars as we continued to fly through the big pine forest. The appeal of a quiver-killer became immediately apparent for me on this outing, as there is little on which the Alpine wouldn’t be fun to ride.Though a size large, the bike never felt sluggish or lazy. Being relatively lightweight likely helped with this, and the 800mm bars were actually an asset as it gave an extra degree of control and assertion when hanging on through the rough.

It is clear the bike was designed and tested by riders with degrees, not people with degrees who ride. I couldn’t stop smiling during and after the ride, and I can say with confidence that the end-user/consumer of this bike will have just as much fun as I did – the Alpine Trail 8, it just does!

Vero launching over some pythons.

Nikki bringing some style to the ride.

Human landslide trundling through the pines.

John letting the Rift Zone soar!

2019 Alpine Trail Build Kits and Pricing

Alpine Trail 7 - $2749 //2699€ //£2200

Alpine Trail 8 - $3699 //3599€ //£3000

We had
a drift
session mid-ride!
Keep it low?
Or pull up hard?

Vero dusting the competition!

Visit www.marinbikes.com for more details.


About The Tester

Zach Faulkner - Age: 27 // Years Riding: 17 // Height: 5'10" (1.78m) // Weight: 205-pounds (93.0kg)

Also known as #MTBJesus, Zach looks like a circus bear on a bicycle. His riding style has been compared to a landslide, replete with sounds of destruction and debris chasing his rear wheel down the hill. He rides flat pedals because they win medals, and he’s fond of quad-piston brakes on all of his bikes. His zeal for riding is life-long, having been astride a bike since before he was forming memories. Bikes kept him in the woods and out of trouble through his teenage years, and after more than a decade of racing DH, can now be found lying in the dirt next to race courses around the World behind a camera, writing at his computer late into the night, or out on the trail thundering through the woods.

Photos by Roo Fowler and Zach Faulkner

Specifications

Product Marin Alpine Trail 8
Model Year 2019
Riding Type Trail
Rider Unisex
Sizes and Geometry
S, M, L, XL View Geometry
Size S M L XL
Top Tube Length 568.76mm 600.65mm 626.63mm 657.4mm
Head Tube Angle 65° 65° 65° 65°
Head Tube Length 90mm 100mm 110mm 120mm
Seat Tube Angle 68.5° 68.5° 68.5° 68.5°
Seat Tube Length 385mm 420mm 450mm 480mm
Bottom Bracket Height 342mm (35mm drop) 342mm (35mm drop) 342mm (35mm drop) 342mm (35mm drop)
Chainstay Length 430mm 430mm 430mm 430mm
Wheelbase 1175.4mm 1204.6mm 1228.9mm 1258.1mm
Standover 701mm 722mm 743mm 756mm
Reach 420mm 440mm 465mm 490mm
Stack 615.2mm 624.3mm 633.4mm 642.4mm
Wheel Size 29"
Frame Material Aluminum
Frame Material Details Series 4 6061 Aluminum Alloy, 3D Forged Rocker Links and Dropouts, Highly Manipulated Tubing
Rear Travel 150mm
Rear Shock FOX Float DPX2, Performance, 3 Position Lever, LV EVOL, Trunnion Upper Mount, 25mm x M8 Lower Mount
Fork FOX 36 Performance, 110x15mm Boost Kabolt Thru-Axle, 51mm Offset
Fork Travel 160mm
Head Tube Diameter Tapered
Headset FSA No 57E, Sealed Cartridge Bearings, 1-1/8"x1-1/2”
Handlebar Deity Blacklabel, 800mm Width, 25mm Rise, Custom Color
Stem Deity Copperhead Stem, 35mm
Grips Marin Locking
Brakes Tektro Slate T4, 4-Piston Hydraulic Disc, 203mm Front / 180mm Rear Rotor
Brake Levers Tektro Slate T4, I Spec II Compatible
Drivetrain 1x
Shifters SRAM NX Eagle, 12-Speed
Front Derailleur N/A
Rear Derailleur SRAM NX Eagle, 12-Speed
ISCG Tabs ISCG05
Chainguide None
Cranks SRAM Descendant 6K Aluminum, Direct Mount 12-Speed, DUB, Boost Spacing, 170mm Length
Chainrings 34 Tooth
Bottom Bracket 73mm Threaded, External Sealed Cartridge Bearings
Pedals N/A
Chain SRAM NX Eagle
Cassette SRAM XG-1275, 12-Speed, 10-50 Tooth
Rims Marin Aluminum Double Wall, 29mm Inner, Sleeved Joint, Disc Specific, 32 Hole, Tubeless Compatible
Hubs Front: Forged Alloy, 110x15mm, 6-Bolt Disc, 32 Hole
Rear: Forged Alloy, 148x12mm, Alloy Axle, Quad Sealed Cartridge Bearings, 6-Bolt Disc, 32 Hole, XD Driver
Spokes 14g Black Stainless Steel
Tires Vee Tire Flow Snap, 29"x2.3”, Tackee Compound, Single Ply, 72 TPI
Saddle WTB Volt Race
Seatpost KS LEV Integra Dropper Post, Southpaw Lever, Size S: 125mm Travel, All Other Sizes: 150mm Travel
Seatpost Diameter 30.9mm
Seatpost Clamp Standard Single Bolt
Rear Dropout / Hub Dimensions 148x12mm Boost Thru-Axle
Max. Tire Size
Bottle Cage Mounts Yes
Colors Cyan/Yellow/Black
Warranty 5 Years for Full Suspension Frames
Weight
Miscellaneous Travel MultiTrac Suspension Platform
Internal Dropper Post and Rear Derailleur Housing
Chainstay Mounted Post Mount Disc Brake
Price $3,699
More Info

www.marinbikes.com

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