Changing to a single front sprocket.

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10/16/2017 12:49 PM

Hi, so I'm new to this came from bmx and got into the mtb scene just recently, I want to change to a single sprocket at the front what teeth would you recommend? What sprocket would you go for? Also it has 4 bolts and I'm not sure on the dimeter hole needed? How do I find that out? Also is it an easy process to do? After researching the best size sprocket would be a 34t - 38t I think? Also I have a 9t cassette at the back, also any other mods you recommend would be great.

Here's a link to the bike. Thanks!

https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Kona-Caldera-Mountain-Bike-2012-Hardtail-Race-MTB_51365.htm

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10/16/2017 1:40 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/16/2017 1:43 PM

Are you certain you have a 9-tooth cassette? Is it the e*thirteen? I ask because they are one of the only brands making a cassette with that size of gearing. The original cassette on the bike you linked to has 11-34 teeth across 9 gears.

If you do have the e*thirteen cassette, I'd suggest a 34-tooth narrow/wide chainring. The thick/thin tooth profile will help keep your chain on. The swap is easy. Just remove your old chainrings and front derailleur/shifter/cable, bolt on the new sprocket, then adjust your chain length as needed.

You can determine what chainring to order by measuring the BCD (bolt circle diameter): https://wickwerks.com/bolt-circle-diameter-bcd/

It's likely 104mm.

If you have the 11-34 tooth original cassette, you'll want to go a bit smaller with the front chainring. 32-teeth would be good. The reason for this is so that you can still climb steep hills. Your top speed will take a hit, however, but that's usually not a big issue for most people.

As far as mods, a rear derailleur with a clutch mechanism will make a noticeable improvement, but may mean the need for a new shifter and cassette as well.

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10/17/2017 4:21 AM

bturman wrote:

Are you certain you have a 9-tooth cassette? Is it the e*thirteen? I ask because they are one of the only brands making a cassette with that size of gearing. The original cassette on the bike you linked to has 11-34 teeth across 9 gears.

If you do have the e*thirteen cassette, I'd suggest a 34-tooth narrow/wide chainring. The thick/thin tooth profile will help keep your chain on. The swap is easy. Just remove your old chainrings and front derailleur/shifter/cable, bolt on the new sprocket, then adjust your chain length as needed.

You can determine what chainring to order by measuring the BCD (bolt circle diameter): https://wickwerks.com/bolt-circle-diameter-bcd/

It's likely 104mm.

If you have the 11-34 tooth original cassette, you'll want to go a bit smaller with the front chainring. 32-teeth would be good. The reason for this is so that you can still climb steep hills. Your top speed will take a hit, however, but that's usually not a big issue for most people.

As far as mods, a rear derailleur with a clutch mechanism will make a noticeable improvement, but may mean the need for a new shifter and cassette as well.

Yeah your right 11-34 9 gears, so when buying the sprocket it gives me an option of 11,10 or 9t which one would I need and what does the (t) stand for, I'm guessing Teeth? And the amount of rows of the gears which is 9..? Does it matter which sprocket I buy or will I need the same (t) as my cassette? Or will any work as long as the bolt amount is the same and the bcd is the same?

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10/17/2017 7:48 AM

9, 10, and 11 indicate how many gears you have out back and what type of chain you're using. In your case, ensure that your chainring is compatible with a 9-speed chain and cassette. Most are.

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