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Today Specialized announced two new 650b (27.5-inch) Stumpjumper EVO models to dealers. The decision to make the move to 650b was based on consumer and retailer demand. 26-inch EVO models will be discontinued going forward, but 29-inch EVO models will still be available. Bikes are expected to be available as early as mid-April. Each model will come in two colors.

Specialized noted that they will use the "650b" designation instead of 27.5, as 27.5 is misleading because the wheels do not fall perfectly between 26 and 29. They'll also continue to stand behind the "bigger is better" mantra and the development of their 29-inch lineup. Specialized's official statement is at the end of this article.

Frame Features

  • 150mm of travel front and rear
  • Sealed cartridge bearing pivots
  • PF30 bottom bracket
  • 12x142mm dropouts
  • Tapered headtube
  • ISCG 05 mounts
  • Internal Command Post IR routing (carbon model)

2015 Stumpjumper FSR Expert Carbon EVO 650b

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The Expert Carbon EVO model features a FACT 9m carbon front triangle and M5 alloy rear triangle. Parts include a RockShox Pike RC fork, FOX Float CTD Factory rear shock with AUTOSAG, Shimano XT brakes, SRAM X01 11-speed drivetrain, 650b Specialized tires, and 650b Specialized 142+ Roval Traverse wheels.

MSRP is $6,500 in the USA and 5699 euros in Europe. Weight is claimed to be 25.8-pounds (11.7kg).

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2015 Stumpjumper FSR Comp EVO 650b

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The Comp EVO model has an M5 Alloy frame with RockShox Revelation RC3 fork, FOX Float CTD rear shock with AUTOSAG, Shimano Deore brakes, SRAM X7/X9 2x10 drivetrain, 650b Specialized tires, and 650b Specialized 142+ Roval wheels.

MSRP is $3,400 in the USA and 2999 euros in Europe. Weight is claimed to be 28.4-pounds (12.9kg).

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2015 Stumpjumper FSR Expert Carbon EVO 650b Frame

A frame and shock only package is also available for $3,000 in two color options.

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Geometry

Specialized has changed up the geometry for this new run of bikes as well. While horizontal top tube length and reach are a hair shorter, chainstays 15mm longer, and head angle 1.4-degrees steeper, the effective seat tube angle gets 0.5-degrees steeper for a better pedaling position and standover improves across the board.

Also of note, an XL option is listed in the geometry table but not in the spec sheets above.

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Keep an eye on www.Specialized.com for the latest.


Press Release:

OUR POSITION – BIGGER IS BETTER. EXCEPT WHEN IT’S NOT.


We believe in big wheels. When they are built properly for the rider and the experience; riders should ride the biggest wheel they can. 29ers are fast, stable, and fun to ride but not all 29ers are created equal. We have developed our Specialized style to minimize the negatives of a larger wheel by focusing on light weight, capability, and fun factor. From recreational hardtails to World-Cup-winning XC race machines to All-Mountain bikes and equipment for men and women—the Specialized 29er advantage is proven.

However, we know not every rider wants to ride a 29er; we will continue to serve the rider with a smaller wheel size. We are happy to introduce our first 650b bike, of course with experience and wheel size specific geometry, the Stumpjumper FSR EVO 650b.

WHY 650b NOW?

650b has the advantage over 26” in traction, stability, & roll-over. Additionally, our priority is serving the riders, who have clearly asked for this type of bike. We are not slowing down one pedal stroke on 29-inch innovation, as we believe in 29ers. Nevertheless, there are two clear scenarios when a smaller wheel, that is potentially lighter & quicker accelerating, may make sense for some riders.

1. Playful: When the rider wants to change directions slightly quicker. The smaller wheels on the 650b bike may feel a little more nimble.  Don’t forget our modern 29er geometry still retains shorter rear ends than most companies’ 650b offerings.

2. Size: When bike sizing or intimidation from taller wheels is an issue. We can make a 650b with more standover clearance on certain models.  There are also some riders, particularly newer riders, who might be intimidated by the look of the 29-inch wheel.

Because of these reasons, we say, “BIGGER IS BETTER. EXCEPT WHEN IT’S NOT.”

WILL SPECIALIZED HAVE 3 WHEEL SIZES?


26” wheels will play a much smaller role in the future. They won’t go away altogether, but expect to see more 650b bikes and equipment. We call them 650b because that is what they are. The name 27.5” is misleading, as they are not in the middle of 29” & 26”.

Our tire team has already introduced 650b tires, while the Roval team is also working to provide the best wheels to the rider. As our position has been from the beginning, we will deliver the best bikes and equipment lines that will help the rider and our dealers. This rad new 650b bike will be available in shops by next week!

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bturman bturman 3/27/2014 5:47 PM

42 comments newest first

68.4 head angle......I know the slightly bigger wheels sometimes result in slightly steeper head angle but thats just crazy, thats going to be all sorts of terrifying on anything nearing steep dizzy

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One thing the marketing BS does is potentially nullify the argument that the pro riders ride what the company dictates, ie. Lopes on the Ripley in the EWS. Clearly, Spesh is saying they were right all along the 29ers, and they are succumbing
the consumer demands. If Curtis Keene shows up at round 1 of the EWS on a 650b bike, it will be because he wanted to.

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How can they call it an EVO with a 68.4 ha when the 26 EVO has a 67 degree head angle?. Nearly all the 150mm bikes from the major players have head angles @ the 67 mark.

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This reeks of Specialized trying to say they were never wrong before, and how they aren't late, they just made the best 29er ever. Barf. If they want to not be misleading, then they should call the 26 inch wheel 26.5, the 27.5 wheel 27.5, and the 29er a 30er. Bravo to them for trying to seem better than everyone else. Can't wait for them to sue someone else who calls a wheel 650b. Who knows, I might even get a cease and desist letter for saying I jumped over a stump last week...

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All you guys thinking the from triangle might be a carry over from the 29 might be right from these pics and geo and dimensions are still not up on Specialized's website, but if you look at the 650 Evo frame only page, the pics look proper. See: http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/stumpjumper-fsr/stumpjumper-fsr-expert-carbon-evo-frame

Also, Vital's got WAY better info and coverage than over at Pinkbike.

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A bike manufactured in 2013 and the first couple months of 2014, hung with entirely 2014 parts, in shops in the spring of 2014, is a 2014 model. And there is nothing wrong w/ that. Why on earth call it a 2015? Afraid some anonymous jerk on a forum is going to accuse you of scrambling to add a bike to the lineup at the last minute? So what. -anonymous jerk

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The spec on the Expert Carbon is sweet!!!
And just when I was starting to warm up to 29ers ;p
Again, 2015 product in March 2014. Sheesh.

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No XL option listed for 27.5. I wonder if this implies the death of the Stumpy 26 and the clear differentiation between rider size and wheel size; 27.5 gets S, M, L and 29 gets M, L, XL?

If they are in fact using a 29 front triangle for the 27.5 model, from a cost perspective it does make sense to abandon 26 bikes going forward. Tooling, especially molds for carbon, is very expensive and if you abandon 26 and use the same tooling for 27.5 and 29, you essentially cut the tooling costs in half.

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In 2012, Specialized dealers sold 7 29ers for every 26" bike they moved. That's why even in 2013 most of the 26 models were thinned way down in the lineup.

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What is the deal with the lower HS 'cup'? IIRC, they used integrated ones…unless it is a 29er front end they are recycling…hmm.

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Good for Specialized. They should capture a lot of riders with these. I hope they continue to offer the 29 models though. For some of us, the big hoops work very well.

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who does the colorways for specialized? I'm not pablo picasso or anything but the person has no freakin clue what they are doing. Luckily for them specialized makes good bikes so I can overlook it, but come on people!!

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Almost 10 years of riding all black bikes is getting old for me. My latest bike is black, and if they had a different color, I would have jumped on it. Different strokes for different folks.

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You do realize that Specialized makes bikes for regions other than the USA, right? And you do realize that Germans love neon and other ridiculously ugly colors, and the UK loves reserved, monochromatic colors, right? Spesh sells more bikes outside the USA than it does within, so do the math. As wethepeople says below, you should get into color forecasting; do you doubt for one second that Spesh doesn't get feedback from its market leaders as to what will and won't sell in their country? C'mon, dude...

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Cannot wait to hear the marketing BS on this one…

Imagine what you could do with an extra inch and a half…hahahaha
Innovate or die (laughing)!

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It's already there:
"Bigger is better. Except when it's not."
That's gotta be one of the stupidest marketing taglines I've ever read.

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Specialized invested in the latest technology coolaid bath. Looks like it's working.

I would love some geo numbers. I love Specialized geo, notably the short stays. And that bendy seat tube points towards shorties! 16.5?

P

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Looking at the 26" I'm guessing 430mm rear centre. They seem to thankfully be moving away from short as possible to more optimum length rear centres these days.

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