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Specialized has been working on a new flat pedal for quite some time - in fact, we've seen versions of this pedal going back a couple of years already. With the pedals now in production, it's time to take a closer look at what's been keeping them so busy.

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Specialized Boomslang Flat Pedal Highlights

  • Low profile, patent pending spindle design
  • Very low profile platform design - true, 10-mm thickness at centre
  • Custom undercut pins provide clip-in levels of grip and easy removal
  • Each pedal body carries 4 spare replacement pins
  • Tapered outside pedal edge for maximum grip and ground clearance
  • Large, modern platform: 110x108 mm
  • MSRP $180.00 USD

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The Boomslang was originally developed with Sam Hill (his departure from the team may help explain why the project ended up taking a little extra time to see the light of day), and the stated goal was to "see just how thin a pedal could be made while retaining all of its strength." The key to achieving this was a newly developed bearing system where a couple of needle bearings are dropped into the pedals from the top (through the small plate visible in the middle of the platform), as opposed to from the side as is more common. The crank side features a more traditional bearing. The result is what Specialized claims is the thinnest full-strength pedal on the market.

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At 10-mm thick in the middle, the Boomslang is indeed one of THE thinnest pedals on the market. The platform tapers out to 15-mm at the edges, providing a concave profile that allows the sole of the shoe to properly "sink into" the pedal.

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The pedal features 11 pins per side, and each pedal also holds 4 spare pins ready to take the place of an unfortunate sibling in case it should meet an early demise. The pins thread in from the bottom and are designed to snap off to avoid damaging the pedal body itself in case of an encounter with the harder parts of Mother Earth. A neat touch is the middle traction pin which also serves to close down the hinge door housing the outer needle bearings.

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The leading edges of the Boomslang were left whole (as opposed to machined out), and their heavily chamfered shape helps the pedals slide over obstacles as opposed to hang up.

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By first looks it certainly seems as though Specialized took its time with good reason. A big step forward compared to the company's previous flat pedal offerings, the Boomslang should have no trouble stirring things up in this very competitive market space (and it will no doubt make a good companion to the recently introduced 2FO shoes from the Cailfornians as well). We'll report back with more detail as soon as we can get a little riding time in on a pair!

photos by Brandon Turman

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iceman2058 iceman2058 8/13/2014 4:48 AM

8 comments newest first

Seems like you probably can't choose to not run that pin though, which is a big disadvantage in my opinion: E13 convinced me, no traction pins in the middle in exchange for increased concavity is a winner.

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Maybe the company trendwatchers know there is some new demand for high-end flats, like a segment of the middle-aged lunch ride crowd is about to give up clips after reading some article, but speaking as a member of the existing flat pedal market, we like bling (whether color, conspicuous tech, or branding), but are pretty price-conscious. $180 is XTR full retail.

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It's possible this pedal is really being built for speccing on their bikes, rather than a focus on retail, but I'm somewhat skeptical of that, even though they have done so in the past(but only on certain models.)

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$180?? Fuck that. So many better pedals for half that price.

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At this price, why not opt for the E13 that comes with 2 pin lengths & flat thread covers, for less cash?

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