If a person were to ask what the most iconic downhill bike is, something in the Intense Cycles M-Series would surely top the list. Ever since the M1's pure dominance in the late 1990s and early 2000s under the likes of Shaun Palmer, Chris Kovarik, and Sam Hill, the M-Series has always embodied what it means to go fast, and the bikes have been some of the most lusted after of all time. As the years have gone on, the bikes have gotten more refined and sleeker, yet maintained a similar silhouette.

Today we're excited to share with you the next generation of the M-Series family - the M16.  Designed and hand-built in Temecula, California, the M16 continues the tradition of being one of the quickest bikes on the hill.

M16 Highlights

  • 27.5-inch wheel size
  • 215 or 240mm (8.5 or 9.5-inches) of adjustable rear travel
  • Two levels of adjustable shock progression
  • Virtual Pivot Point (VPP) suspension
  • Hydroformed aluminum construction
  • 9.5 x 3.0-inch Cane Creek Double Barrel coil shock
  • 157mm rear hub spacing
  • Comes with 12x157 locking collet axle
  • Threaded bottom bracket with ISCG 05 tabs
  • Tapered headtube
  • Serviceable pivot points featuring collet bolts and grease ports
  • Molded FLK-GRD protection
  • External cable routing
  • Integrated fork bump stops/cable guides
  • Intense Red and Black colors
  • Made in the USA
  • Weight: 11.5-pounds (Large frame with shock)
  • MSRP $3,399 frame with shock

Intense was the first company to bring a 27.5 DH bike to market with the 951 EVO, and after a year or so hiatus in the production of the M9, the introduction of the M16 was Intense's chance to once again update the platform in several ways.

One of the biggest updates is to the suspension, which still uses the tried and true VPP concept originally introduced to the M-Series clear back in the M3 days. Like the M9, the new M16 features adjustable travel (215 or 240mm) and adjustable shock progression via the lower and upper shock mount holes on the frame, respectively. The M16 is designed to be more progressive than the M9, giving the bike a livelier, poppier feel. Most of Intense's World Cup chooses to use the shorter travel setting, though the longer travel setting offers a more planted ride in rough terrain. Combined with the adjustability of the suspension design, the use of the Cane Creek Double Barrel coil shock allows you to tune the suspension to ride the way you want it to.

The M16 also utilizes a proven collet-style dual linkage system featuring oversized 15mm axles with expander cones and angular contact bearings. Maintenance is quick and easy thanks to replaceable grease zerks.

M16 Geometry

Surprisingly, not much has changed in terms of the bike's geometry - a testament to brand's love of the M9. While the M9 featured adjustable geometry via G3 dropouts and a Cane Creek Angleset, the M16 uses the most commonly used settings for the sake of simplicity, durability, and weight savings. Gone are the G3 dropouts, and in their place is a new 12x157mm dropout.

Compared to the stock M9 settings, the M16 has a slightly slacker head angle at a fixed 63.5-degrees, slightly longer effective top tube length, and comparable reach and chainstay measurements across the board. The bike's higher 365mm bottom bracket height encourages the rider to pedal through the rough bits, and adds to the more playful feel.

From The Creator

Listen in as we chat about the M16 with Jeff Steber, the main man behind Intense Cycles:

Pro Build Kit

The M16 will be initially be offered in the build kit shown above with others on the horizon. The $7,999 Pro Build makes use of some of the best components in the business, including the SRAM X01 DH drivetrain, Shimano Saint brakes, a RockShox BoXXer World Cup fork, and the super adjustable Cane Creek Double Barrel coil shock.

In Action

Watch Chris "The Karver" Kovarik put the hurt on some rocks with new M16:

Visit www.intensecycles.com for more details, or come check out the bike in person at booth #571 at the Sea Otter Classic.

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