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​Airdrop Bikes was born out of one man's passion for mountain bikes and his desire to break away from the 9-5 grind. With 12 years of industrial design experience, Ed Brazier took a leap of faith, quit the day job and went about building his dream. The Edit is Airdrop's first bike, and judging from what we've seen of it so far, it appears to tick all the boxes of the modern all-mountain, trail, or enduro slayer; 66-degree head angle, 435-mm chainstays, 76-degree effective seat tube angle, and a long front-centre optimized for use with 35 to 50-mm stems. In order to keep costs down and stay in touch with their customer base, Airdrop sell direct to the consumer.

Airdrop Edit Highlights

  • 6061-T6 Heat treated alloy tubing
  • 150-mm Horst Link rear wheel travel
  • 27.5” (650b) wheels
  • Built for 1x drivetrains
  • Tapered headtube
  • 142x12mm rear axle
  • Threaded BB with ISCG05 tabs
  • Replaceable dropouts
  • Replaceable hanger & brake mount
  • Frame only, frame bundles, and 3 full build kits available
  • Designed and assembled in Sheffield, UK

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The Edit features a classic Horst Link rear triangle layout, which Airdrop says has been tuned to provide a good balance between plushness, progressivity, and pedalling efficiency.

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Airdrop Edit Geometry

The Airdrop features bang up to date trail bike geometry, starting with the slack head angle, low BB, and short stays. The medium's reach of 453-mm is more or less what would traditionally be considered a size large, which is in line with the current trend towards longer front-centres and shorter stems. The steep, 76-degree seat tube angle should provide an efficient and comfortable climbing position.

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Airdrop Edit Pro Build Kit

There are 3 complete bikes available in addition to a frame-only and a frame bundle option. Airdrop also offers custom orders for those extra special requests. Here is the mid-level Pro build, which features a classic SRAM portfolio of proven parts together with Joystick finishing kit. Note that the current version of the Edit does not support Stealth dropper post routing, but they say it is likely to be added at a later stage.

  • Fork: Rockshox Pike RCT3 Solo Air 150
  • Rear Shock: Rockshox Monarch Plus RC3 Debonair
  • Headset: Cane Creek 40 ZS44/55
  • Rear Axle: Rockshox Maxle Ultimate 142x12mm
  • Seatpost: Rockshox Reverb 125mm
  • Rear Derailleur: SRAM X1 1x11
  • Shifter: SRAM X1 1x11
  • Cassette: SRAM X1 10-42
  • Chain: SRAM PCX1
  • Cranks: Raceface Turbine DM32
  • Bottom Bracket: Raceface Cinch 73mm BSA30
  • Brakes: SRAM Guide R
  • Rotors: 35 Classic Wave 180mm
  • Wheels: SRAM Rail 40
  • Tyres: Maxxis High Roller II 27.5x2.3 EXO/TR
  • Stem: Joystick Builder 35/35mm
  • Handlebars: Joystick 8-bit Alloy 800mm
  • Saddle: Joystick Analog
  • Grips: Raceface Half Nelson
  • MSRP: €4,133.25

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More information available at www.airdropbikes.com.

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iceman2058 iceman2058 12/10/2015 9:20 AM

16 comments newest first

No internal routing for a dropper. Surely if they are "made" or whatever in house, how hard is it to drill a hole and install a grommet. Seems lazy to me.

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You expect a person around 5 and 5 inches to ride a bike with 434mm of reach?, even with a short stem it would be imposible for such person to navigate a switchback

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Looking at their website seems they are doing bikes without wheels as an option. That's cool! I've read some less than stellar reviews of Srams wheels. And seems like you could spend that money better elsewhere. Nice!

Bummer that it's a split rocker link though. Kinda defeating the purpose of a 142 rear end if it's not connected to anything laterally solid at the other side?

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both the seatstay and chainstay are bridged so it should have plenty of lateral rigidity. I agree completely about the frame + fork, shock & dropper packages and the lackluster SRAM wheels. That's a smokin' deal if you want to cherry pick the less expensive and preferential components. Now if only they made an XL

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Chain stay bridge looks fine. But seat stay bridge is tiny. And the long stays themselves act as levers on the small bridge. Even if you rode it back to back and couldnt notice the difference your still putting more lateral strain on the bearings and increasing wear. Not as effective as welding the rocker if not casting it together. I know that's armchair engineering. smile But the logic is sound and most bikes have moved past bolting rocker plates together.

Problem with new geo XL's is just that the market is small. Giant stopped sending XL reigns at least to the US this year. If they can't sell enough to make it worth while it's hard to think a new small company could?

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I agree with you that it would be better with a one piece rocker link, maybe they'll wise up and make one in the future. It would bring the price up but would be well worth it. Giant made the Reign with such a low stack that I'm not surprised they weren't selling XL's when there are plenty of other bikes out there with similar reach numbers and higher stack. They also didn't even bother bringing the XL Glory AL into America, which make me think they hate really tall people wink

Xtra Large people. Many brands have XL's with about 485mm reach. I'm 6'5" with an ape-factor of 10 (6'9" wingspan) so I'd find a 500mm reach comfy with a 45mm stem. The old 26" Specialized Pitch XL had a 490mm reach and they came with a 60-70mm stem.

shutter2ride actually all of it is made in sheffield been following this since i saw it just browsing the web!

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I want to believe that, and it would be great, but no where does it state that the frames are made in the UK. "We develop our own frames in house, refining and testing them on the trails of the Peak. They’re hand-made by carefully selected factories. Then they’re built to order here in Sheffield using tried & tested components".

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Website specific says they are only assembling in the UK. Just like most bike companies, made in Asia. You can't get em cheap and also get them home made! smile

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Looks promising for sure. I 'love' how they try to make it sound like things are all done in the UK, but the frame is probably made in Taiwan which I really have no issue with. Nice try though.

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really like the look of these bikes, but DAMN are bikes getting big. the reach on the small one here is almost 20mm longer than the reach on my large DW DHR

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