Accessibility Widget: On | Off

Photo

Remember when Cam Zink spun 360-degrees off the Oakley Icon Sender and won the 2010 Red Bull Rampage? He was riding a prototype Corsair Dominion frame. Three and a half years later, the bike has been reborn under a new name and will actually go to production this time.

Known as the Imperium, the updated frame carries on the "three bikes in one" design goal, offering 5.7, 7 or 8.4-inches (145, 178.5 or 212.4mm) of travel. By swapping the rear shock and fork and adding the appropriate shock mounts, you can convert the bike from slopestyle to freeride to downhill. Previously known as the UNIT suspension design, the linkage is a variation of what can be found on old Corsair Konig frames.

Additional updates to the Dominion frame include a tapered headtube and 142mm rear axle. Why the 142? Corsair says it's so the bike can be equipped with "a more modern 1X drivetrain."

Photo

The bike features an adjustable head angle through the use of a Cane Creek AngleSet and pinch bolts in the headtube. Previously the Dominion was adjustable from 62.5 to 69-degrees, and we expect the Imperium will follow suit. The chainstay length is also adjustable via the sliding dropout system from 16.5 to 17-inches.

In the 8.4-inch travel setting with a 200mm fork and 26-inch wheels, geometry is as follows:

Photo

Note that the geometry chart lists specs for the "Corsair Dominion 650B/26 DH." Given the bike's adjustable rear end and head angle, mounting up either wheel size should be doable thanks to the sliding dropouts, but Corsair is currently evaluating the ride qualities and compatibility before they give the final word.

Photo

Shock options include those from FOX and Cane Creek. Atomlab "mini build kits" will also be available.

Complete specs and pricing are expected following the Taipei Bike Show this March, and availability is slated for late Spring. Corsair indicated that the previously introduced Toro 4X/Slalom hardtail is also due to finally see production as well. Distribution is being set up right now. There are distributors in several countries and people always have the ability to get a frame direct from Corsair if no distributor exists in their country.

Keep an eye on www.corsairbikes.com and the Corsair Facebook page for more details. In the meantime, take a look at the ride that Cam Zink piloted to stardom back in 2010:

Related:
Create New Tag

bturman bturman 2/18/2014 10:32 AM

11 comments newest first

Kind of a neat idea. But there reason to move to 142 leaves them sounding a little clueless. "Okay, you guys want this fancy new stuff. Fine, we will grudgingly make it compatible." I admit I'm reading into it a bit, but its the feeling there statement gives me.

| Reply

Originally the idea of the bike was four options with a front derailleur. The first bikes were 135mm. A few 142mm bikes were made and with further testing more changes were made. Expect the Imperium to be more gravity oriented in the bottom bracket/axle/drivetrain. Sorry for the delay in responding.

| Reply

Oh FFS Corsair, try making ONE bike that works well in ONE realm instead of a moonlighter that isn't particularly good at any one thing. I mean seriously, I'm a bike fiend with an assortment of shocks, forks & bike spare parts etc (the bane of myrelationship with my girl), but who in shit's name is going to have the appropriate length shock, mounts, linkage plates, fork etc to flip it between 5.7" & 8.0".

Completely out of touch with the market realities, Corsair. Completely out of touch. A company with either more money than common sense or a company spending way too much time on the pipe.
.

| Reply

Power to you then Big Bird. Assuming, logically, that stock it's release with a 9" shock, whoever would then go out & buy themselves all of the required hardware, linkage plates, a quality shorter stroke rear shock & forks, & then repeatedly invest the time in order to flip it between its settings with any regularity needs to spend more time riding their current pipes. Then (way) down the track go & buy two bikes that work really well in their chosen disciplines.

| Reply

I'm not saying that I'd switch it up for every ride. I'm a geek. I've got eight bikes. I like to work on and ride them. My friend Jason has a Nicholi that has been free ride, cross country, short travel DH with a triple clamp, and basically locked out dirt jumper. Play. Have fun. Keep a good parts bin.

| Reply

Where I live, I am building it in the 7" with a single crown. On those rare occasions that I get to go to Whistler...I have a 888 and a Double Barrel. The idea isn't really adjustable travel, more being able to build the bike you want.

A Freeride bike with All-mountain component spacing? So much for a full swap. Otherwise, it looks great.

| Reply

Sorry for the delay. We have prototypes in several axle widths for testing. Expect 150mm for production frames. Thanks, we think it looks great too!

| Reply
Show More Comment(s)