Newb interested in trying MTB again.

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9/5/2018 1:28 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/5/2018 1:30 AM

So as the title describes I'm an ex motocross guy stationed in AZ (Tucson) and tried my hand at MTB this time last year prior to my deployment. Picked up a 2017 Remedy 7 and rode it a whopping one time and decided it wasnt for me. Can't remember the exact trail but it was not the easiest jump into the sport, I just remember hating the climb and constantly feeling like I was gonna get off the trail and hit a cactus or rocks, etc. Left thinking why do so many people love this. Well here I am with lots of ex moto friends saying I didnt really give it a chance with only one ride thinking they maybe right. I loved being able to throw the bike in the back of the truck in the morning, hit a trail, then head home at lunch for a beer, was a way easier hobby in my opinion than moto ever was. So my question for you guys would be should I give it another shot? Did you instantly fall in love with MTB'ing? Or was it something that came with time like anything else. Looking back at all the times I crashed and sucked when I was first was learning moto but kept pushing I can see parallels to my first and only MTB experience. Perhaps I should have got a different bike like the the 29'er Fuel EX I was looking at instead of the Remedy? Part of me still thinks I would enjoy MTB but just didnt give it a fair chance. Figured I'd ask the Vital experts before reinvesting in the possible new hobby of MTB. Thanks in advance.

Zach

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9/5/2018 7:55 AM

ZachOT wrote:

So as the title describes I'm an ex motocross guy stationed in AZ (Tucson) and tried my hand at MTB this time last year prior to my deployment. Picked up a 2017 Remedy 7 and rode it a whopping one time and decided it wasnt for me. Can't remember the exact trail but it was not the easiest jump into the sport, I just remember hating the climb and constantly feeling like I was gonna get off the trail and hit a cactus or rocks, etc. Left thinking why do so many people love this. Well here I am with lots of ex moto friends saying I didnt really give it a chance with only one ride thinking they maybe right. I loved being able to throw the bike in the back of the truck in the morning, hit a trail, then head home at lunch for a beer, was a way easier hobby in my opinion than moto ever was. So my question for you guys would be should I give it another shot? Did you instantly fall in love with MTB'ing? Or was it something that came with time like anything else. Looking back at all the times I crashed and sucked when I was first was learning moto but kept pushing I can see parallels to my first and only MTB experience. Perhaps I should have got a different bike like the the 29'er Fuel EX I was looking at instead of the Remedy? Part of me still thinks I would enjoy MTB but just didnt give it a fair chance. Figured I'd ask the Vital experts before reinvesting in the possible new hobby of MTB. Thanks in advance.

Zach

For myself MTB was great cross training for Moto. I finally gave up moto due to lack of close riding areas here in SoCal and overall expense. MTB fills the need. So to answer your question, Yes it is a new skill set to learn and you have to work at it to get to the top of the hill. The Remedy is fine for your location, unless your interested in more X-country riding. Get in with some other riders and shop rides. Good luck and most of all. Have fun!

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9/5/2018 9:25 AM

I switched this year for a few reasons, but time was one of the main ones. I have a wife and a child (a little over a year and a half now) and I found that my moto habit was really putting my wife out and having to make her do a fair amount on her own. I also wasn't getting as much enjoyment as it felt like I was always having to pinch in time around my 9-5 keyboard pecker job, family time, and general life to not only ride, but cleaning and maintain the bike as well. So I made the jump and couldn't have been happier. I'm in Denver and work in Broomfield so most of the summer I'd get out at least two mornings a week and be riding from sun up to about 7ish, shoot over to work, shower at the gym there, and be at my desk by 8. Then usually get a longer ride in over the weekend but again, I'm out of the house while everyone is still sleeping so for my life, that's like "free time" when that happens. Get a 3-4 hour ride in, be home by 10. Not having to sit around an wait for a track to not only be open, but prepped, really opens your schedule and mtb is way easier to fit in around other life events than moto is.

The other thing that I've found is for me, the adventure is half the adrenaline rush. I've tried to travel around and hit as many places as I can this summer and I'm finding that even if I don't have the best ride and don't feel like I pushed my riding to another level, it was still one hell of a time going someplace new and jetting off into the woods under your own power. Granted, I don't have gps or anything, still on the rand mcnally program, so everything isn't laid out in front of me which can get the heart rate going when riding a new place. When it came to moto, it was the same tracks, same layouts, and occasionally you just hit those slumps where you don't feel improvement and kinda get down on the whole thing. Its also hard to maintain a track on CO so we'd occasionally go through slumps where the tracks were in bad shape and weren't fun to ride either. The mtb trail quality here though is stellar and I'm never leaving thinking, man, that place sucked today.

Sounds like you're kinda where I was at earlier this year and I would say give it another shot. Be realistic though and give yourself 2 months or so to get your biking legs under you. Start on some easier climbs and get used to the bike first. Lastly, don't expect to save a boatload of money, they're both still hobbies and have moving parts that break. Especially rims if you're coming off moto, ask me how I know

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9/5/2018 10:42 AM

GA902 wrote:

I switched this year for a few reasons, but time was one of the main ones. I have a wife and a child (a little over a year and a half now) and I found that my moto habit was really putting my wife out and having to make her do a fair amount on her own. I also wasn't getting as much enjoyment as it felt like I was always having to pinch in time around my 9-5 keyboard pecker job, family time, and general life to not only ride, but cleaning and maintain the bike as well. So I made the jump and couldn't have been happier. I'm in Denver and work in Broomfield so most of the summer I'd get out at least two mornings a week and be riding from sun up to about 7ish, shoot over to work, shower at the gym there, and be at my desk by 8. Then usually get a longer ride in over the weekend but again, I'm out of the house while everyone is still sleeping so for my life, that's like "free time" when that happens. Get a 3-4 hour ride in, be home by 10. Not having to sit around an wait for a track to not only be open, but prepped, really opens your schedule and mtb is way easier to fit in around other life events than moto is.

The other thing that I've found is for me, the adventure is half the adrenaline rush. I've tried to travel around and hit as many places as I can this summer and I'm finding that even if I don't have the best ride and don't feel like I pushed my riding to another level, it was still one hell of a time going someplace new and jetting off into the woods under your own power. Granted, I don't have gps or anything, still on the rand mcnally program, so everything isn't laid out in front of me which can get the heart rate going when riding a new place. When it came to moto, it was the same tracks, same layouts, and occasionally you just hit those slumps where you don't feel improvement and kinda get down on the whole thing. Its also hard to maintain a track on CO so we'd occasionally go through slumps where the tracks were in bad shape and weren't fun to ride either. The mtb trail quality here though is stellar and I'm never leaving thinking, man, that place sucked today.

Sounds like you're kinda where I was at earlier this year and I would say give it another shot. Be realistic though and give yourself 2 months or so to get your biking legs under you. Start on some easier climbs and get used to the bike first. Lastly, don't expect to save a boatload of money, they're both still hobbies and have moving parts that break. Especially rims if you're coming off moto, ask me how I know

Crazy how you nailed it on the head just by the few sentences I wrote in regards to moto. Same here. I fell in love with moto when I was stationed in NJ. I was new to the area, hooked up with some guys who rode local pits and then it just grew from there to the track. It's crazy to think how much it consumed my finances, free time and life. I wasnt the greatest at it but it was all about moto and it didn't help we had some great dirt and track options in NJ. Got stationed last year in Arizona thinking it would be a moto dream, oh how I was wrong. As you alluded to the track here in Tucson is like a kid's track, small with a few upkept tables, the people scene is almost non existent the few people have well established riding friend circles. Drove up to phoneix but thats a 2.5 hour drive/5 hour round trip to ride the tracks there and still just didnt get that same feeling I got when I was in NJ. I don't know if after 6 years of nothing but moto as a hobby I just burnt myself out but somehow I've fallen out of love with motocross, not to mention the expense, $25 track fees, oil changes, gear, etc. I came back from this deployment and thought I'd get back into moto as I wait to start grad school in a year and needed a hobby while still here in AZ. Needless to say, same thing, my lack of smiling or passion for it just wasnt there. I didnt feel driven on the bike, cringed everytime I had to buy something for it as I've been doing so well saving for becoming a full time student and finally the last straw crashing last weekend and ending up with a massive waterballon of a hematoma on my hip right now. So here I am reevaluating what hobby I can get into to stay somewhat sane over the next year. Which led me to MTB thoughts.

Last year when I sold all the moto stuff I picked up a sweet Remedy, the gear and decided to give MTB a shot. As I mentioned that first ride was a struggle. I'm an active guy (run 6-7 miles 3 times a week and weight train) but trying to climb that trail hill I felt discouraged, coupled with the descent feeling like I was a bit out of control and not ready for the cactus and rocks everywhere left me rethinking my first foray into MTB and not what I was expecting. So I sold the bike to a good friend and became a boring adult. My ex moto friends who are crazy obsessed MTB'rs now told me I didn't give it enough time and part of me thinks they may be right. I mean moto wasn't easy at first either. So here I am thinking about the benefits of MTB, fresh air, good exercise/training, new hobby/goals, meet new people, explore new trails/places and am thinking about buying another bike and trying again but wanted to see from you guys and gals if you were in the same place when you first started MTB. The sucky hill climb, not so sweet feeling descent, etc. or was it instant love?

Thanks for the input man and happy trail riding.

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9/5/2018 11:07 AM

i can't help you on the moto vs MTB thing, but i've put your post on the homepage and know you'll get even more great advice. what's been written so far is awesome. if you find the right trail to kick off your career, i think you'll enjoy mountain biking. good luck out there!

i LOL'd pretty hard at this piece of honesty - "So I sold the bike to a good friend and became a boring adult." - you'll find the spark!

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9/5/2018 11:10 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/5/2018 11:13 AM

sspomer wrote:

i can't help you on the moto vs MTB thing, but i've put your post on the homepage and know you'll get even more great advice. what's been written so far is awesome. if you find the right trail to kick off your career, i think you'll enjoy mountain biking. good luck out there!

i LOL'd pretty hard at this piece of honesty - "So I sold the bike to a good friend and became a boring adult." - you'll find the spark!

Nice! I feel famous. Thank man. Now to figure out if I should buy another Remedy, Fuel or something else, been looking on CL and Pink Bike but not finding much, might just go new again and commit. Hopefully see you on the trails.

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9/5/2018 11:57 AM

So this is actually my second stint into the mtb world. The first stint was right after college and I believe my first ride consisted of nikes, plaid cargo shorts, and a bmx helmet on a hardtail, bottom of the line KHS. There will for sure be a learning curve and some moments you'll look back and laugh at. I think the thing people never talk about is balance while climbing. You can't learn it or train in the gym for it. It will simply require time on the bike. Even when I came back to it this year, it was a struggle. Start on some mello climbs that aren't very technical and work your way up from there. In the mean time, hit up a stationary bike if you can and start building a base while you're figuring out a bike.

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9/5/2018 11:57 AM

I’d give it another go! I do a lot of trail running, MTB, and dabble in the dirt bike stuff. One thing I like about all around trail riding is that it combines the endurance and cardio of running (when riding uphill) with the rush of dirtbikes (when riding downhill). I think if you ca; connect to both of those experiences, you’ll find some pleasure. The trail probably matters the most. If the climb was too brutal or the downhill too sketchy, then it’s not much fun. Look/ask around for the right trails to suit your current ability and I’d guess you’ll have a better time. There are a lot of great trails in and around Tucson!

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9/5/2018 12:20 PM

ZachOT wrote:

So as the title describes I'm an ex motocross guy stationed in AZ (Tucson) and tried my hand at MTB this time last year prior to my deployment. Picked up a 2017 Remedy 7 and rode it a whopping one time and decided it wasnt for me. Can't remember the exact trail but it was not the easiest jump into the sport, I just remember hating the climb and constantly feeling like I was gonna get off the trail and hit a cactus or rocks, etc. Left thinking why do so many people love this. Well here I am with lots of ex moto friends saying I didnt really give it a chance with only one ride thinking they maybe right. I loved being able to throw the bike in the back of the truck in the morning, hit a trail, then head home at lunch for a beer, was a way easier hobby in my opinion than moto ever was. So my question for you guys would be should I give it another shot? Did you instantly fall in love with MTB'ing? Or was it something that came with time like anything else. Looking back at all the times I crashed and sucked when I was first was learning moto but kept pushing I can see parallels to my first and only MTB experience. Perhaps I should have got a different bike like the the 29'er Fuel EX I was looking at instead of the Remedy? Part of me still thinks I would enjoy MTB but just didnt give it a fair chance. Figured I'd ask the Vital experts before reinvesting in the possible new hobby of MTB. Thanks in advance.

Zach

I definitely think it comes with time. Finding good beginner trails and a good bike to start learning on is crucial in my opinion. I ate a lot of shit when I first started riding, but I kept pushing and the better I got the more fun it became. Also riding with people who are willing to foster a newb can be pretty helpful as well.

Best piece of advice I can give is to try and go on as many group or bike shop rides as you can that are appropriate for your skill level. If you don't have anything like that around you, try to find a few easy trails and ride them over and over until you feel like you have them dialed then take a step up in difficulty. But definitely be patient and keep on pushing.

Trust the process! haha

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I try to do less thinking and more sending.

9/5/2018 12:58 PM

I'm a Mountain biker, it's my only thing. I don't run, trail run, I hike every now and then a and throw a leg over a dirt bike when I can, but more than anything I'm a Mountain biker. That being said my first year was pretty rough. I was 15, I got an old C'Dale from my pops, rode it all over the neighborhood and loved it. Finally convinced my dad to take me to Tahoe and we rode Northstars bike park. We didn't know what we were doing and I ended up having an ok day. I got a flat, we ended up on a black trail slowing down other riders, it was fun but stressful. The following year we went back, rented DH bikes, and found some gem of a trail (Coaster I think it was called) that was just right for me. Twisty smooth single track through the woods, it was an experience I'll never forgot. It's what sold me in mountain biking. The rest of that season was rough too, hard learning curve getting up to speed in a bike park, but I could always go back to that trail, and would always end with the biggest grin on my face.

Fast forward 9 years and I just finished a stint as a service manager in a bike shop, and moved to Colorado to pursue more mountain biking! Getting started is hard, frustrating, and can be tricky mentally, but it's all worth it in the end. Take your time, go at your own pace, find some trails you like, and take it from there.

I do think one of the things that really helped me was just riding a shit ton. I'd ride around my neighborhood, build sketchy features in the dirt lot down the road, I just spent so much time on a bike that I got comfortable on it. I was riding for an hour or two at least every day after school. Made a huge difference once I got to the gnarlier stuff.

The best advice I can give anyone at any skill level, just have fun! Even if the climb sucks, or the decent is a bit hairy, you're out there for fun. Don't stress the ride, don't get mad at yourself, just enjoy it. If you're ever in the Denver area hit me up! I'll show ya some fun stuff!

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9/5/2018 1:07 PM

Moosey wrote:

I'm a Mountain biker, it's my only thing. I don't run, trail run, I hike every now and then a and throw a leg over a dirt bike when I can, but more than anything I'm a Mountain biker. That being said my first year was pretty rough. I was 15, I got an old C'Dale from my pops, rode it all over the neighborhood and loved it. Finally convinced my dad to take me to Tahoe and we rode Northstars bike park. We didn't know what we were doing and I ended up having an ok day. I got a flat, we ended up on a black trail slowing down other riders, it was fun but stressful. The following year we went back, rented DH bikes, and found some gem of a trail (Coaster I think it was called) that was just right for me. Twisty smooth single track through the woods, it was an experience I'll never forgot. It's what sold me in mountain biking. The rest of that season was rough too, hard learning curve getting up to speed in a bike park, but I could always go back to that trail, and would always end with the biggest grin on my face.

Fast forward 9 years and I just finished a stint as a service manager in a bike shop, and moved to Colorado to pursue more mountain biking! Getting started is hard, frustrating, and can be tricky mentally, but it's all worth it in the end. Take your time, go at your own pace, find some trails you like, and take it from there.

I do think one of the things that really helped me was just riding a shit ton. I'd ride around my neighborhood, build sketchy features in the dirt lot down the road, I just spent so much time on a bike that I got comfortable on it. I was riding for an hour or two at least every day after school. Made a huge difference once I got to the gnarlier stuff.

The best advice I can give anyone at any skill level, just have fun! Even if the climb sucks, or the decent is a bit hairy, you're out there for fun. Don't stress the ride, don't get mad at yourself, just enjoy it. If you're ever in the Denver area hit me up! I'll show ya some fun stuff!

Thanks man, sound advice and perspective. I think that was my issue for my first MTB ride too. I had just sold my MX bike and was so set on making MTB feel the same. I struggled the whole ride and stressed about it not giving me that same fullfillment as moto did so much that I think I just was like this isnt working for me and gave up without really trying or giving it a chance.

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9/5/2018 1:09 PM

Not to sound too much like a jerk, but you quit after one ride?

Here is the bottom line: Mountain biking is HARD. It challenges your physical and mental capabilities. It will also NEVER get easier. You constantly push your limit and continue to grow in strength, endurance, and mental fortitude. Every ride will take you further, hence the never getting easier part.

The payoff is that it gets you fit, is great fun, and a great stress reliever (like all exercise).

If this sound like something you are into, then yes, you should get a bike and go for it - Just don't quit after one ride because its 'hard'.

If it is intimidating, maybe rent a bike a few times to get a feel for it. Then decide.

If it sounds like too much work, too hard, then you shouldn't. But remember, most things in life worth doing aren't easy.

Personally, I say go for it. There is a reason it is such a popular sport....

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9/5/2018 1:14 PM

I have been riding moto since age 5. Im 51 now. MTB uses all your moto skills but now your body is the motor. It is the best thing that has happened to me. You now have to watch your diet or you suffer. You get to watch all your friends get fat and you stay trim. Get two different bikes if you can. I have a All mountain rig and a Gravel bike for exploring and putting in the miles. You won't regret it. At my age the MOTO beats me up and the MTB puts me back together.

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9/5/2018 1:22 PM

PositronicJohnny wrote:

Not to sound too much like a jerk, but you quit after one ride?

Here is the bottom line: Mountain biking is HARD. It challenges your physical and mental capabilities. It will also NEVER get easier. You constantly push your limit and continue to grow in strength, endurance, and mental fortitude. Every ride will take you further, hence the never getting easier part.

The payoff is that it gets you fit, is great fun, and a great stress reliever (like all exercise).

If this sound like something you are into, then yes, you should get a bike and go for it - Just don't quit after one ride because its 'hard'.

If it is intimidating, maybe rent a bike a few times to get a feel for it. Then decide.

If it sounds like too much work, too hard, then you shouldn't. But remember, most things in life worth doing aren't easy.

Personally, I say go for it. There is a reason it is such a popular sport....

I didn't expect it to be easy and I'm not a quitter or quit because it was hard (active duty, I rode and raced moto, etc. used to hard things and persverence). I just set myself up to fall in love with it after one ride and when that didn't happen gave it up. But I get what you're saying.

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9/5/2018 1:23 PM

Buy a used 140-160mm travel bike that’s half way decent for somewhere between $2-4K. 2-3 years old is fine. There are some killer deals on lightly used bikes right now. Frankly, it’s insane. Many companies are completely sold out of desirable models costing $5-8k. People flip them fast and it means the used market is really good.

Ride it on some intermediate level trials, starting with rides in the 1-2 hour range. It’s gonna suck the first 5 or 6 times as you begin to build your pedaling fitness.

Take your time on the climbs. Go at a pace that is a good sustainable workout but not so hard that your totally sucking wind and generating lactic acid. The fitter you get the more speed you can make and carry and the more fun it is, but you can still have tremendous fun with even modest, novice levels of pedaling fitness, especially if you have some Moto skills to get you going fast downhill.

Go to the local shop and get some trail info. Pick some fun loops with a good climb or two and a good descent or two. Tucson has to have some of that besides the epic big rides on Lemon.

Keep riding. Find other people to ride with. Mountain bikers are generally a fun and friendly group of people who are happy to have company (barring a few overcrowded locations where localism is starting to creep in.)

By the 12th or 15th ride, my guess is that you will reach a reasonable level of fitness and the pedaling part won’t suck as much. You might even start to like it, like many of us do. As a Moto guy, you will start digging the downhills and rolling sections of trail where you can jump some terrain and nail some steep crux move that previously intimidated you into submission. You will start peggin corners you know faster and faster. You will start challenging yourself and you might really like the sport. These moments of personal glory will stick in your head like some of your best memories do. You will find yourself daydreaming about riding at work, or at the dinner table, or when you are supposed to be listening to the person who is talking at you. It is then that you are a mountain biker.

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9/5/2018 1:23 PM

Randy_Geniec wrote:

I have been riding moto since age 5. Im 51 now. MTB uses all your moto skills but now your body is the motor. It is the best thing that has happened to me. You now have to watch your diet or you suffer. You get to watch all your friends get fat and you stay trim. Get two different bikes if you can. I have a All mountain rig and a Gravel bike for exploring and putting in the miles. You won't regret it. At my age the MOTO beats me up and the MTB puts me back together.

Thanks for the input and I get that last statement. No stranger to injuries and usually my mindset was always, no big deal, I'll get back to it in no time, but this last injury which wasnt even the worst had me second guessing if it was still worth it.

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9/5/2018 1:26 PM

Fox wrote:

Buy a used 140-160mm travel bike that’s half way decent for somewhere between $2-4K. 2-3 years old is fine. There are some killer deals on lightly used bikes right now. Frankly, it’s insane. Many companies are completely sold out of desirable models costing $5-8k. People flip them fast and it means the used market is really good.

Ride it on some intermediate level trials, starting with rides in the 1-2 hour range. It’s gonna suck the first 5 or 6 times as you begin to build your pedaling fitness.

Take your time on the climbs. Go at a pace that is a good sustainable workout but not so hard that your totally sucking wind and generating lactic acid. The fitter you get the more speed you can make and carry and the more fun it is, but you can still have tremendous fun with even modest, novice levels of pedaling fitness, especially if you have some Moto skills to get you going fast downhill.

Go to the local shop and get some trail info. Pick some fun loops with a good climb or two and a good descent or two. Tucson has to have some of that besides the epic big rides on Lemon.

Keep riding. Find other people to ride with. Mountain bikers are generally a fun and friendly group of people who are happy to have company (barring a few overcrowded locations where localism is starting to creep in.)

By the 12th or 15th ride, my guess is that you will reach a reasonable level of fitness and the pedaling part won’t suck as much. You might even start to like it, like many of us do. As a Moto guy, you will start digging the downhills and rolling sections of trail where you can jump some terrain and nail some steep crux move that previously intimidated you into submission. You will start peggin corners you know faster and faster. You will start challenging yourself and you might really like the sport. These moments of personal glory will stick in your head like some of your best memories do. You will find yourself daydreaming about riding at work, or at the dinner table, or when you are supposed to be listening to the person who is talking at you. It is then that you are a mountain biker.

Love it. Thanks for the perspective and poetic call to MTB.

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9/5/2018 2:46 PM

Man, it's like half of us are MX guys. I still call myself one, although I haven't really ridden my MX bike in over a year, whereas I ride MTB twice a week or more. I've been buying shoes, MTB jerseys and even a new bicycle.... wait.... I'm an MTB rider now!

The fitness will come, and so will the comfort level for riding downhill sections. Just apply the same skills you would use on a motorcycle and you'll be (mostly) fine. I find that the only major difference between MTB and Motocross is that you cannot "blip the throttle" on takeoffs or drops; you have to adjust for that.

For perspective, I've been riding motocross for 30+ years and only started riding MTB seriously for the last 3 years or so. It's like a new frontier for me.

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9/5/2018 2:53 PM

Get back out there! Tucson is definitely an unforgiving place to learn to ride but once you get used to desert riding I think it is one of the best spots in the world to bike. There is a lot of amazing tech to be found here but you need to make sure you get started on some mellow trails and work your way up. I'd recommend that you start over at sweetwater on desperado loop (counter clockwise) and then work your way through their other trails. Very beginner friendly but still interesting riding and a beautiful location with signs everywhere. Once you get more comfortable on your bike get over to 50 year trail up Oracle road and start out with a ride to the chutes. Check out youtube videos on this its a fun old moto downhill thats super smooth and flowy. The other trails around 50 are significantly better but more advanced and some of the best you will find anywhere once you get your skills up. For downhill Bug Springs is incredible and not super advanced and should be your first trail when you want to do some of the shuttle runs on the mountain. Your other option would be to just drive up to Sedona and ride anything that isn't hi-line hangover or hogs and you will have a great intro to mountain biking. Avoid Starr Pass and Lemmon until you get more comfortable riding desert as they can be a bit discouraging. Your bike should be perfect for any trail in Tucson.
Biking isn't for everyone but Tucson is a great spot to be a mountain biker since we have everything from mellow desert singletrack to super gnar up on the mountain and everything in between.
Enjoy

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9/5/2018 3:07 PM

Hold on, i think this "going home for a beer at lunch" element, is flying too far under the radar ?

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9/5/2018 3:41 PM

I ride both MTB & Moto, but I ride MTB more :

MTB
MTB riding access in many trail areas nearby
MTB trails are free to ride in many areas
MTB maintenance intervals are less than moto
MTB parts / gear are relatively affordable
MTB bikes are very capable bikes uphill / downhill
MTB is great exercise
MTB risk of injury is still high, but less than moto
MTB is affordable to own multiple bikes
MTB is affordable to ride mutliple MTB disciplines
MTB is affordable to race

MOTO
Moto riding is limited in many areas
Moto tracks are expensive & crowded
Moto maintenance intervals are high & expensive
Moto parts / gear are expensive
Moto bikes are expensive
Moto risk of injury is very high
Moto is very expensive to race











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9/5/2018 5:10 PM

I was the opposite. I started Moto in 2017 because I was always tired from Mtn Biking and thought it would be a nice easy way to get out and enjoy the trails and take it easy. WRONG!!!! Its hard, hot, and fun. long story short I sold the moto and sold it for what I paid for it...unlike Mtn bikes that lose tremendous value.

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9/5/2018 6:04 PM
Edited Date/Time: 9/6/2018 11:50 AM

I would highly recommend mountain biking. Consider this, many of the top moto racers are trained by retired mountain bike racers on fitness & riding technique, as well as cross training on mountain bikes in the offseason. Riding moto will give you a good headstart at learning mountain biking, but mountain biking is a set of riding skills of its own that take practice & years of learning mountain bike specific techniques that you don't use in moto. I would say that the Trek Remedy 7 you orignally bought was actually a good choice for a moto rider getting into mountain biking, it is an all mountain bike that you can ride in many terrains & conditions. I am not very familiar with the riding in AZ, but I would recommend looking up your local trails on Project MTB & finding a local mountain bike shop that can direct you to local trails that may be more fun. I would recommend buying another all mountain bike that has slightly better climbing geometry, I would recommend the Santa Cruz Bronson 29. For me, the larger 29 wheels feel more similar to moto wheels & have less rolling resistance so the climbs & the downhill feel faster. I would not recommend anything less than a 27.5 wheel size. It takes time & patience to get better at mountain biking, but once you do you will enjoy riding your mountain bike much more than moto.

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9/6/2018 12:43 AM

Appreciate all the input from those I didn't get to quote. For some reason my browsers aren't letting me vote thumbs up or quote anyone.

Think I found a nice 17 Remedy 8 in Wyoming on Pinkbike I may snag and go from there. I appreciate all the encouragement, perspectives, thoughts and recommendations. MTB clan seems like a great group to be a part of. Now to figure out pedals, gear, etc. again.

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9/6/2018 10:15 AM

Any places nearby with lift service? Doing a park day is so much fun. Your still progress dramatically and it’s kind of an equalizer if your riding with others much fitter than you. Getting that much vertical in a day will up your motivation for the trails and help you feel more comfortable on the descents.

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9/6/2018 10:17 AM

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9/7/2018 3:58 AM

No offense but is it a North American thing to need some sort of reaffirmation on wanting to do something fun? If your already thinking about riding you should probably just give it a shot instead of asking a website...

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9/7/2018 4:42 AM

thrashdog wrote:

No offense but is it a North American thing to need some sort of reaffirmation on wanting to do something fun? If your already thinking about riding you should probably just give it a shot instead of asking a website...

Did you even read his first post? Doesn't sound like ya did

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