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MTB Tech Rumors and Innovation

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8/15/2020 1:28 PM

ORTOGONAL555 wrote:

Here's a better look of the new maxxis mud tire. Blenki ran them some time ago at Rotorua.
Photo

Looks like a perfect tire for dusty conditions, and without cutting them down !

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8/15/2020 5:49 PM

Primoz wrote:

Ah, but it's a full piggyback shock. But then, what drives the oil to the piggyback? On a normal shock it's the volume change with the damper shaft displacing the oil and driving it towards the reservoir. What's the mechanism here?? Or is it just an elongated mount to keep the same effective ETE and stroke on a standard shock as opposed to the thru-shaft shock? And just screw it onto the bearing mount shock variant. Or use the thru-shaft shock damper body but normal internals.

As far as i know there is clearance issues with the lockout lever on the piggyback in the last third of the travel. So trek moved the lockout lever onto the shock body instead of leaving it on the piggyback as seen on this rail. Photo

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8/16/2020 1:05 AM

Oh god... 'We can't fit the shock to the frame... Let's make a completely custom shock that no one ever will stock parts to service and won't know how to service it!'

Logic.

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8/16/2020 7:01 AM

Primoz wrote:

Oh god... 'We can't fit the shock to the frame... Let's make a completely custom shock that no one ever will stock parts to service and won't know how to service it!'

Logic.

no, just trek wink

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8/16/2020 10:36 AM

I know Trek is one of the largest bike brands in the world. But can I just say, as someone who has been mountain biking since 1995, I have never once been "wow'd" by a single Trek design. They are like the vanilla ice cream of the bike world. And my lack of excitement for them always gets increased with all the proprietary crap.

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8/16/2020 11:33 AM

Well they aren't the only offenders. Won't say they aren't the worst offenders, but nevertheless it might be a close match with some other brands.

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8/16/2020 1:07 PM

vweb wrote:

Looks like a perfect tire for dusty conditions, and without cutting them down !

I'd say this was their intent too. The wetscream hasn't seen use since 2014 cairns I think and it's an old design (even though I tried one and it is not bad, it just feels a bit weird). Shorty's knobs are maybe too short and the central rectangular one may not jel well with deep stuff. Maxxis are expanding their range of dh tires a lot, how many are there, 8?

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8/17/2020 12:33 AM

Primoz wrote:

Oh god... 'We can't fit the shock to the frame... Let's make a completely custom shock that no one ever will stock parts to service and won't know how to service it!'

Logic.

I'd love to see the process which the crayon holders use to come up with these bikes. Bike like the rail should fit any shock.

Bike industry has planned obsolescence and early life failure down to a tee though! Saw a video of the Levo SL, open up the charge plug and there is water in there...

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8/17/2020 12:57 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/17/2020 12:58 PM

New forbidden coming soon!

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8/17/2020 12:58 PM

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8/17/2020 1:53 PM

I think he might mean that the first race is in 14 days

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8/17/2020 2:53 PM

Philip_Rossetti wrote: Photo

rugbyred wrote:

I think he might mean that the first race is in 14 days

I’m not referring to the “14 days” but to the frame and 38. I don’t think he would put a 38 on a 130mm bike

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8/17/2020 3:04 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/17/2020 3:04 PM

Philip_Rossetti wrote:

I’m not referring to the “14 days” but to the frame and 38. I don’t think he would put a 38 on a 130mm bike

No head tube badge or any other Forbidden branding either.

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8/17/2020 4:28 PM

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8/17/2020 6:09 PM

Philip_Rossetti wrote: Photo

rugbyred wrote:

I think he might mean that the first race is in 14 days

Philip_Rossetti wrote:

I’m not referring to the “14 days” but to the frame and 38. I don’t think he would put a 38 on a 130mm bike

Proof that I don’t know much!

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8/17/2020 6:20 PM

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8/17/2020 9:52 PM

With a completely electronic system and a 6 speed cassette with the correct ratios, you could halve the cassette width and still keep the current 12 speeds and their ratios. Which would be beneficial for the chain line, spoke angles and so on. Might even be possible to go back to narrower rear ends with relatively wide spoke spacing.

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8/18/2020 8:15 AM

Primoz wrote:

With a completely electronic system and a 6 speed cassette with the correct ratios, you could halve the cassette width and still keep the current 12 speeds and their ratios. Which would be beneficial for the chain line, spoke angles and so on. Might even be possible to go back to narrower rear ends with relatively wide spoke spacing.

The system above offers 1:1 and 1:0.7 so you would still have to run a 9 speed to get the same number of gear ratios. It is certainly an interesting product and line of thought. I'm sure with a dedicated MTB hub built with larger cassettes in mind (even if the 'minimum' was 34 instead of 28) the extra real estate in the hub could potentially offer better sealing or more range.

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8/18/2020 10:22 PM
Edited Date/Time: 8/18/2020 10:22 PM

Primoz wrote:

With a completely electronic system and a 6 speed cassette with the correct ratios, you could halve the cassette width and still keep the current 12 speeds and their ratios. Which would be beneficial for the chain line, spoke angles and so on. Might even be possible to go back to narrower rear ends with relatively wide spoke spacing.

Masjo wrote:

The system above offers 1:1 and 1:0.7 so you would still have to run a 9 speed to get the same number of gear ratios. It is certainly an interesting product and line of thought. I'm sure with a dedicated MTB hub built with larger cassettes in mind (even if the 'minimum' was 34 instead of 28) the extra real estate in the hub could potentially offer better sealing or more range.

Nope, 6 cogs can give you 12 ratios wink

I'll write a bit more about this in the afternoon, I already did some quick calculations in Excel yesterday.

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8/19/2020 3:58 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/19/2020 3:58 AM

Some 2021 Trek bikes listed as for sale here in Australia ? Fuel and Remedy
https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/s/dual-suspension-mountain-bikes/trek?sort-by=most_expensive

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8/19/2020 4:19 AM

Trek has dropped the Reactiv shock for the 2021 Remedy as well as the 2021 Slash.

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8/19/2020 5:01 AM

Hammerschmidt did it first/better.

I would love a new, lighter Hammerschmidt that you could pair with the e*13 DH cassette and an even smaller derailleur....

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8/19/2020 5:25 AM

Primoz wrote:

With a completely electronic system and a 6 speed cassette with the correct ratios, you could halve the cassette width and still keep the current 12 speeds and their ratios. Which would be beneficial for the chain line, spoke angles and so on. Might even be possible to go back to narrower rear ends with relatively wide spoke spacing.

Masjo wrote:

The system above offers 1:1 and 1:0.7 so you would still have to run a 9 speed to get the same number of gear ratios. It is certainly an interesting product and line of thought. I'm sure with a dedicated MTB hub built with larger cassettes in mind (even if the 'minimum' was 34 instead of 28) the extra real estate in the hub could potentially offer better sealing or more range.

Primoz wrote:

Nope, 6 cogs can give you 12 ratios wink

I'll write a bit more about this in the afternoon, I already did some quick calculations in Excel yesterday.

You are definitely correct! I was thinking gear range, my bad.

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8/19/2020 1:02 PM

stringbean wrote:

Thoughts on this having a place in the MTB world?

https://cyclingtips.com/2020/07/this-rear-hub-has-2x-wireless-shifting-inside-and-11-gears-on-the-outside/Photo

hamncheez2003 wrote:

Hammerschmidt did it first/better.

I would love a new, lighter Hammerschmidt that you could pair with the e*13 DH cassette and an even smaller derailleur....

i've always felt / said that the hammerschmidt was ahead of its time.

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8/20/2020 8:46 AM

Photo

Not technically new technology but here’s another brand selling the Mullet setup straight from the factory. Seems like it’s almost part for part the same bike that wyn and Martin are racing on
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8/20/2020 9:38 AM

Masjo wrote:

The system above offers 1:1 and 1:0.7 so you would still have to run a 9 speed to get the same number of gear ratios. It is certainly an interesting product and line of thought. I'm sure with a dedicated MTB hub built with larger cassettes in mind (even if the 'minimum' was 34 instead of 28) the extra real estate in the hub could potentially offer better sealing or more range.

Primoz wrote:

Nope, 6 cogs can give you 12 ratios wink

I'll write a bit more about this in the afternoon, I already did some quick calculations in Excel yesterday.

Masjo wrote:

You are definitely correct! I was thinking gear range, my bad.

I actually read it as that. Anywho, the way I'd use this, completely integrated, is with a cassette of 6 cogs, which would be 10, 14, 19, 26, 35 and 49. With a ~0,85 easy gear ratio of this planetary gearbox, you very nicely drop just in the middle 'cogs' of the cassette once engaged (as opposed to 1:1 ratio), meaning you get virtual 11,8, 16,5, 22,4, 30,7, 41,3 and 57,8 toothed cogs. And almost 580% of range.

The planetary gearbox ratio was determined by trial and error, same goes for the cassette (smaller cogs emant weird jumps between gears in at least one part of the cassette) and it gives a very smooth drivetrain jumps wise with a minimal jump of 14 % (only one under 15 %, going from 30,7 to 35 'cog'), max jump of 18,6 % and an average jump of 17 %.

Pic (jump 1 is 10 to '11,8' or 10 underdriven):
Photo
I've added the current crop of Sram Eagle systems (shows how utterly stupid the 52T cassette is) and Shimanos' 10-51 cassette. This combo geartrain is more constant throughout the range than both and gives more range than both as well.
How to achieve that? You start in the 10T cog and in 1:1 mode on the planetary. Pressing the shifter to choose 1 gear lighter switches the internal hub. Pressing it again switches BOTH the internal hub and the chain on the cassette.

Minuses? The jumps on the cassette are very big, it might be hard to get reliable shifting with the current state of affairs, shift ramps in the style of front shifting might be needed. And I don't see this happening without electronic shifting as you simultaneously shift two different systems. And the timing of the shifts might be an issue. It maybe could be possible with a twin indexing system in the trigger shifter by using two cables, but yeah, this is a challenge.

The benefits? Narrower cassette, narrower hubs and/or wider flange spacing on the hubs. That's the main thing and I don't think it'd be worth it unless either Sram or Shimano went that route for total integration. As to why? Well if you have a system that shifts smoothly under full load, you want to use it all the time. It doesn't make sense to me to use with a DH cassette or as a Hammerschmidt, because those are cassette double-uppers, where, once you reach one end of it, you have to move across the WHOLE cassette (and shift the fast and smooth mechanism only once) in order to get to the 'next gear'. And we all know how well that turns out. So why not use it all the time? I agree, using small DH like clusters seems nice (weight wise, production cost wise, shifting performance wise), but the negative, in my opinion, is just too great. You're effectively back to 2x gears of yore. And nobody likes those too much, the simplicity of 1x systems is just awesome.

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8/20/2020 9:49 AM

jonkranked wrote:

i've always felt / said that the hammerschmidt was ahead of its time.

Yes and no. The issue with Hammerschmidt for example was that it wasn't really compatible with the bikes it was put on. Because it was mostly an either-or spec list with 2x drivetrains. And when you design antisquat curves for ~32T chainrings (or larger), the 22T (was it 22T?) of the Hammerschmidt will cause unwanted bob. Design a bike specifically for a Hammerschmidt and a normal 2x drivetrain will be crappy.

It would work very well with the current crop of idler bikes though, there would be no antisquat changes there.

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8/20/2020 9:58 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/20/2020 10:00 AM

Lew just posted a vid of him testing the prototype rig. pretty tight lipped about any numbers though, but definitely has more travel(duh).

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8/20/2020 10:07 AM

Hoping the cockpit will be decently long on this one as opposed to the Druid (which is something between an M and an L length wise in their XL size).

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8/21/2020 10:03 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/21/2020 10:06 AM

One of the Cannondale lads is riding an interesting bike in the new 50to01 video, looks like the proto dh bike from last year but eagle drivetrain suggests maybe more of a long travel "superenduro" type bike Photo

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