skelldify's Likes

Liked a comment about press release $2,061,000 IS UP FOR GRABS IN 2019 - INTENSE PODIUM PAYBACK PROGRAM 2/27/2019 9:16 AM

Hey i consider myself fairly decent at math. How are they going to give that money to Gwin if they are PAYING out to racers on their bikes, getting podiums? Please solve the below equation. show all work.

$2,061,000 - (money paid to privateers) = Paying Gwin's salary

This press release has 27 comments.

Liked a comment about press release $2,061,000 IS UP FOR GRABS IN 2019 - INTENSE PODIUM PAYBACK PROGRAM 2/27/2019 9:15 AM

Even if it was 120 races and everyone on the podium was riding an Intense that would be $120,000 total ($500 each for a mens/womens full podium). Where does the other $1,941,000 go?

This press release has 27 comments.

Liked a comment about press release $2,061,000 IS UP FOR GRABS IN 2019 - INTENSE PODIUM PAYBACK PROGRAM 2/27/2019 9:15 AM

OMG I feel so stupid, this is mostly going to Gwin. It's a cheap marketing trick. How much do you think Gwin gets for a 1st place at a world cup. Intense it probably going to give 90% of that money to Gwin.

-6 1 7

This press release has 27 comments.

Liked a comment about video Sedona's BURLIEST Lines with Nate Hills: "White Line is the Easy Part" 2/4/2019 5:06 PM

So prognarcore. More core-ha’s w internet videos. Some things should be kept private.

0 1 1

This video has 10 comments.

Liked a comment about feature Slow Motion Action of The Message Front Linkage Suspension System 1/15/2019 9:31 AM

Im really curious about some reviews from legit testers also. Not sure if you read the same review as I did, (online blog of a wheelbuilder who hosted the Outside Mag testing who detailed his communication with Trust?) but it said something similar. It seemed valid and well put together but then I stumbled on his previous blog post where he took some pretty crazy positions - low bb's are bad and cause extreme trail damage, droppers over 100mm are unnecessary, even 2.6 tires are too small, bikes with bar height that's below full saddle height are unrideable and some other craziness. Kinda made me invalidate everything he said in his Message review. That said, I do find it a bit odd that we are not seeing more frothiness online from people that bought them or reviews sooner. I mean...people that buy a $2600 fork probably love nothing more than talking about how superfabulous their $2600 fork is. Patiently waiting...for the jury to return.

This feature has 41 comments.

Liked a comment about feature Slow Motion Action of The Message Front Linkage Suspension System 1/15/2019 9:30 AM

Test feedback I've heard has been mixed. Great in the corners. Great on smoother trials. Terrible in the rough stuff. Overdamped. One tester I know of (testing for a different publication) in an area littered with more technical trials actually took it off after 2 rides, suggesting it was maybe broken. He didn't hear back from his editor, and the product went somewhere else.

Anxiously awaiting to hear more, but I won't be plunking down that kind of money unless I'm absolutely certain its a step forward...

Love that someone is willing to think outside the box. There is little doubt this type of idea will likely head somewhere (XC? "light" trail?), I'm just not convinced it'll be the long travel market in its current iteration.

This feature has 41 comments.

Liked a comment about feature Slow Motion Action of The Message Front Linkage Suspension System 1/15/2019 9:30 AM

I've been discussing the theory of this product with some my customers who are interested in potentially buying one. I think the real challenge is putting it on the right frame. Because the headangle doesn't change as much through the stroke, you don't need a slack front end. If anything, a longer stem and steeper HA seems like it would provide better action. It seems like it was tailor made for bikes like Evil Following, Pivot 429 Trail, Tallboy, etc. I know they want to sell to as many customers as possible, but Trust saying that it will cover travel range from 110-150 seems off base. Even if it rides high in the travel, your bb will drop significantly, wheelbase shortens, stack lowers, etc. Other concern is for dynamic riders who use their suspension to pump/pop/preload off trail features. If it works best absorbing impacts from below but maintains a firm platform from body input, seems like it won't offer as lively of a response as a telescopic fork. As a suspension/linkage/mechanical/Lego nerd I'm in love with the idea, but it seems like it will only be effective for a pretty small segment of the market in its current guise.
If they expand their product line, I'd love to see them execute a dual crown version ala the carbon Maverick DUC32. One piece legs/lower crown, with a machined alloy upper crown. It would look amazing having a straight line from bar to axle, and it probably wouldn't have to be much heavier. With the amount of material built up around the steerer tube, I'm sure they could make that way lighter if the forces were distributed between two crowns.
Just my two cents

This feature has 41 comments.

Liked a comment about feature Slow Motion Action of The Message Front Linkage Suspension System 1/15/2019 9:28 AM

While I understand the engineering behind it I struggle with it. It strikes me as a solution to an invented problem. If linkage driven suspension really is worlds better why aren’t linkage forks being run on works motocross bikes or moto-trials bikes etc. I know everyone hates the motor sports references when it comes to anything bike related but there has to be a reason these teams with their giant R&D budgets and cost is no object mentality (not to mention access to some of the worlds foremost engineers, no disrespect to Mr. Weagle) haven’t adopted this technology. There were a few companies in the 80s running them and they have completely vanished. I also get and respect that we’re comparing apples to oranges here but it seems geometry is geometry and rider position is rider position A better performing fork would appeal in either genre. Granted I’ve never ridden it, and will likely never get a chance to as I’m not friends with @the_owl with his limitless budget for bicycle related regalia. I would gladly bounce it down the trail for a lap or two though.

This feature has 41 comments.

Liked a comment about feature Slow Motion Action of The Message Front Linkage Suspension System 1/15/2019 9:25 AM

Apparently there are a ton of Dennis on here based on the number of people giving feedback on their experience. NUTS how much money some people have now

-2 3 5

This feature has 41 comments.

Liked a comment about feature NATHAN RENNIE - The Inside Line Podcast 1/15/2019 5:59 AM

For what it's worth to you (and I dont expect to change your opinion) , I raced the same races as him during the days when the World Cup was not as big financially as the NORBA Nationals, where the pro DH guys raced all weekend long in DH & Dual Slalom/Dual/4Cross & weren't given rides back to the top. Tracks were dangerous garbage and all of them were VERY dangerous and the bikes were still garbage and death traps themselves.
Compounding it, he outweighed EVERYONE by a mile. He was a giant & the bikes were so lethal under him, he lost a ton of Nationals and World Cup races because the equipment he was on was terrible. He was sponsored by IRC Tires. They flatted constantly under a light rider and I think he was something like 225lbs???
He was also more light on his bike and could do BMX tricks like a circus freak. He'd jump a monster double, land on the rear, transfer to the front wheel and actually jump the double off his front wheel, land it on his front and go back to a manual.
He was THE most talented rider on the circuit, the biggest physically & yet light as a panther.
Wish people could see what he was doing back then in person

This feature has 37 comments.

Liked a comment about feature Solving Problems: e*thirteen's Approach to Better MTB Components 5/5/2016 3:06 PM

Gwin doesn't even need a chain to win a race, so calling out the chaingide he uses is pretty moot point. Pro riders parts need to last one run... using that criteria as the basis for what you and I run isn't sound. That said, have had nothing but great luck with e13 chainguides and have been using them since Gwin was back in 9th grade.

0 1 1

This feature has 23 comments.

Liked a comment about feature Solving Problems: e*thirteen's Approach to Better MTB Components 5/5/2016 3:05 PM

"With riders like Aaron Gwin, Sam Hill, Josh Bryceland....you know each product is thoroughly tested before it hits the shelves."

Two of the first three are actually on MRP chainguides.

This feature has 23 comments.

Liked a comment about product review 2015 Test Sessions: Trek Slash 9.8 Carbon 27.5 1/24/2015 8:14 AM

Please take what I am saying from an obviously biased commenter who owns a Pivot Mach 6.

I was waiting for this particular review to identify any biases the reviewers may have. Big factory MTB bike review vs. small boutique MTB review, etc.

This article spends a fair amount of time talking about getting fit right and changing out both stem and bars on the Trek to achieve comfortable reach settings, which according to vitalmtb is a critical fit parameter when "off the seat" as in the case of aggressive downhill riding. Do I have that right?

The previous review of the Pivot M6 discusses similar fit issues - all centered around reach I didn't recall any mention of changing out bars, stem, etc. for the M6 review. Just "if you have shorter arms and longer legs....you may want to pay close attention to geometry...." etc. Isn't that the case for ANY bike purchase? How could geometry for a particular frame take into account every combination of body dimensions? This is why fit of a bike is entirely subjective but extremely important.

From the M6 review:

"if your legs are long and you have a shorter reach the Mach 6 may give you some trouble, and the same goes for shorter legs and longer arms."

Which basically says the geometry of the Pivot, as is (without changing out stem and bars) is right on the money for people who do not have long legs, short arms; or short legs with longer arms. Which I read to say "The Pivot provides a great fit if your dimensions for arm and leg length are proportional."

After all of that, the reviewer finally admits:

"Regardless of the short reach, the bike (M6) was planted, the suspension worked well, and there wasn't a ton of racket coming from any component. The suspension would stick to the ground and add stability, which was a pleasant surprise compared to other lightweight bikes that can feel sketchy when opened up."

So I am a little confused as to how the Trek gets 4 stars, while the Pivot Mach 6 gets 3.5 when apparently the fit of both bikes was called into question and one bike was ridden as is (the M6) while the other bike was modified to suit personal geometry preferences.

This is only anecdotal, but every person I have ever talked to has commented on the Pivot's ability to BOTH climb and descend with absolute dominance. I own both a Mach 429 Carbon and the M6 and the M6 is freakishly good at climbing and is within striking distance of my 429. Other reviews from notable sources have set the M6 as the benchmark in the enduro / trail category. This is why I am completely baffled that you give the Pivot 3.5 stars mostly centered around the subjective aspects of fit (which the Trek also had, but gets 4 stars).

With respect to bike reviews in general: In the end, the only thing that is unique to the manufacturer of the bike is the frame and the linkage design; the frame materials; the build quality including fit and finish; and the geometry. Everything else is essentially third party and can be swapped out at the rider's leisure. Reviews of brakes, drivetrain, suspension, wheels, tires, dropper posts, bars, stem, etc. are all just repeats of past reviews of those same products.

With geometry a preference - that leaves frame and linkage design, frame materials, and build quality as really the only considerations for a full bike review.

This product_review has 23 comments.

Liked a comment about product review 2015 Test Sessions: Trek Slash 9.8 Carbon 27.5 1/24/2015 8:10 AM

Vital, I'm getting tired of "don't let the slack head tube angle fool you" and "one of the most well rounded" jargon. We hear that every review. I appreciate your hard work but this review tells me nothing.--Actually it tells me that this, the Nomad, the Spartan, the (insert any enduroooo bike) are all the same. How about telling me how it climbs compared to all the others. How does the braking feel compared to, how does the cornering feel compared to, how does it feel on a 3000 vert climbing day, etc.

-1 4 5

This product_review has 23 comments.

Liked a comment about product review 2015 Test Sessions: Trek Slash 9.8 Carbon 27.5 1/24/2015 8:10 AM

Vital, I'm getting tired of "don't let the slack head tube angle fool you" and "one of the most well rounded" jargon. We hear that every review. I appreciate your hard work but this review tells me nothing.--Actually it tells me that this, the Nomad, the Spartan, the (insert any enduroooo bike) are all the same. How about telling me how it climbs compared to all the others. How does the braking feel compared to, how does the cornering feel compared to, how does it feel on a 3000 vert climbing day, etc.

-1 4 5

This product_review has 23 comments.

Liked a comment about product review Tested: GT Sanction Pro Frame 11/19/2014 7:32 PM

I have 2 sets. No problems with either. In contrast, my buddy has gone through 3 of their rims so far. We both agree the performance is awesome. As for square tires, we both think the width takes a Hans Dampf to the next level.

This product_review has 23 comments.

Liked a comment about product review Tested: GT Sanction Pro Frame 11/19/2014 7:31 PM

Honestly - I wouldn't plan on ever seeing too much "official" on these when it comes to reviews. The company has their little niche but by no means is trying to be a "brand". The closest you'll see is a review on the Ibis wheelset - which is fairly similar.

But yeah - in my humble opinion, go for them!

This product_review has 23 comments.