SRM Power Meter on Shimano Saint 3

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SRM Power Meter on Shimano Saint - 2013 Products from Interbike 2012, Part 2 - Mountain Biking Pictures - Vital MTB

Several of the big dogs on the DH World Cup scene have been using power meters this season to help put a little more science back into racing and training. You may recall Danny Hart, Andrew Neethling, and Aaron Gwin with them, among others. The data provided gives a clear picture of a rider's power output at any given time. This can be useful when comparing runs or to track progress during the off season. The SRM system isn't cheap, though, with prices ranging from $2000 to $3500 for complete kits. Part of the high cost is the need to machine some cranks to interface with the system. SRM is also working with Freelap to develop a combined timing/power meter tool.

Visit www.srm.de for more details.

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3 comments
  • Capricorn

    9/23/2012 3:14 AM

    I'm curious to know how the power meter is being used, because a downhill event, generally is NOT dependant upon cranking it out. Tracks like Leogang with it's pedally middle section, showed that even if you sucked during that section, you could still take the time back by being balls-out on the bottom, non-pedally section. For DH, on a very simplistic level, it would be best to have a brake-meter: count how many times you've braked, for how long and where on the track.

    While I understand why power meters are used in general: for road and XC it makes sense, but DH? I'm not too clear on that. Come vital: what's the skinny on power meters in DH and how exactly is the data being used to assist the rider?

  • bturman

    9/24/2012 1:41 AM

    One way that the Stages Cycling boys mentioned is to analyze the power output needed to get up to speed after a corner, meaning that you could take two lines through a turn during practice and then look at how much effort you had to put out to get back to top speed afterwards.

  • blacksim549

    9/23/2012 3:28 PM

    That brake-meter idea is genius.