First Look: 2015 Roval Traverse Fattie Wheels - Wider is Better

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Fat is where it’s at, according to Roval Wheels. That’s why they’ve increased the width of their hand-built carbon Traverse SL and aluminum Traverse rims, in addition to several other key updates. After over a year of testing and more in development the all-new Traverse Fattie wheels are ready for the trails. Boasting a 30mm internal width and Zero-Bead Hook, the wheels unlock the potential of a low-pressure tire while helping to maintain sidewall support and stability.



Roval Traverse SL Fattie 29 and 650b Highlights

- Rims: Carbon, 30mm inner width, Zero-Bead Hook technology
- Front Hub: Alloy body, sealed cartridge bearings, 15/20mm end cap compatibility
- Rear Hub: Alloy body, sealed cartridge bearings, 135/142 & 142+ end cap compatibility, DT Swiss Star Ratchet w/ 6° engagement, XX1 driver body compatible
- Tubeless: Compatible with Roval rim strips and all-new Roval rim plugs
- Spokes: DT Swiss Revolution (24 front, 28 rear)
- Build: Hand laced, tensioned, and trued
- Decal: 3 vinyl options included with wheels
- Warranty: 3 year/limited lifetime with $125 rim replacement program for non-warranty repairs (plus labor)
- Weight: 29” = 1,570g; 650b = 1,530g (weights do not include valve stem, rim strips, or added vinyl)
- MSRP $1,400

Roval Traverse Fattie 29 and 650b Highlights

- Rims: Alloy, 29mm inner width, Zero-Bead Hook technology
- Front Hub: Alloy body, sealed cartridge bearings, 15/20mm end cap compatibility
- Rear Hub: Alloy body, sealed cartridge bearings, 135/142 & 142+ end cap compatibility, DT Swiss internals, XX1 driver body compatible
- Tubeless: Compatible with Roval rim strips
- Spokes: DT Swiss Revolution
- Build: Hand laced, tensioned, and trued
- Weight: 29” = 1,770g; 650b = 1,690g (weights do not include valve stem, rim strips)
- MSRP $600



Using an angled grip table to simulate laying the bike over in a corner, Roval looked at several different width rims to see what happened to the tire under load. This tire displacement graph helps illustrate what you feel on the bike. A wider rim results in less tire movement under the same force, which yields less squirming and more control.

How wide is too wide, though? Roval says a wider rim means more material and, at some point, you are adding more material (weight) than you are gaining a better riding wheel. They felt and saw massive increases in cornering traction by going from 22mm to 30mm with a minimal weight penalty. As you increase the width another 10mm, you get some benefit over the 30mm but the improvement is much smaller while the weight gain was dramatic. Roval decided that 30mm is the best blend of the wider rim support while still keeping the weight low.

Visit www.specialized.com for more details.

Photos by Brandon Turman and Dan Barham.
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1 comment
  • rewob

    6/16/2014 12:29 PM

    That tri color version. Mmm

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