Added reply in a thread Let's Build the Most Expensive TRAIL Bike Ever: 2/6/2016 9:15 AM

Keep em coming! I'm about to head out on a ride but I'll update the build when I'm back. Happy Saturday!

Added reply in a thread Let's Build the Most Expensive TRAIL Bike Ever: 2/5/2016 5:01 PM

Added the Fox. If you can post links to the rims/hubs w/ MSRP I'll add them. I need individual prices for each component.

Added reply in a thread Let's Build the Most Expensive TRAIL Bike Ever: 2/5/2016 3:46 PM

That'd be the one. Added.

Added reply in a thread Let's Build the Most Expensive TRAIL Bike Ever: 2/5/2016 2:46 PM

I was speaking in regard to shock tune w/ the Switch Infinity setup, but that too is answered in the next question in their FAQ. "Can I put a coil shock on my SB6c? Yes. The SB6C is designed for use with air or coil shocks." I think there's a certain ... more »

Added reply in a thread Let's Build the Most Expensive TRAIL Bike Ever: 2/5/2016 1:20 PM

Woooo dawgy! Added. Anyone know if any other shocks will fit on the yeti and work properly? I know it'll come up so we should figure that out now.

Added reply in a thread Let's Build the Most Expensive TRAIL Bike Ever: 2/5/2016 12:31 PM

Thanks Gnarnia420, frame and fork added to the build. Off to a good start.

Added reply in a thread Which Component Do You Drop First? 2/5/2016 12:28 PM

I'd lose the gears. Sure I'd be pushing up a lot of the climbs... but I do that anyways.

Started new thread Let's Build the Most Expensive TRAIL Bike Ever: 2/5/2016 10:27 AM

Time to build the most expensive custom trail bike. This time I'm not starting the build at all, so it's all up to you guys to find the goods. The DH build came out kinda crazy, so let's lay down some rules for the trail bike build: 1. Find a post up ... more »

This forum thread has 41 replies

Added reply in a thread Newbie 2/4/2016 1:25 PM

Man, there's a TON of history out there regarding the sport so it really just depends on how far back you want to go. Some notable names: Nico Vouilloz Steve Peat Myles Rockwell Missy Giove Shaun Palmer Sam Hill Sabrina Jonnier Greg Minnaar Rachel Atherton ... more »

Added reply in a thread 2016 Racing Rumours 2/3/2016 12:04 PM

The official PR from Intense regarding their 2016 factory lineup:

Intense Cycles announces 2016 Factory Team Roster Feb 2, 2016 - Temecula, CA : Intense Cycles announced its 2016 Factory Race Team last night at an exclusive event they hosted ... more »
Added a new slideshow THE KYLE STRAIT INTERVIEW 2/3/2016 11:18 AM
C138_straita

This slideshow has 4 comments

Added reply in a thread Trail Closures San Diego County 2/3/2016 9:58 AM

Another local to the area, Steve Ford, may have something in the works at Teds. That said, he's asking riders in San Diego to stay off the property for the next couple days while he tries to work something out. From Steve: Call to arms...Please, nobody

... more »
Liked a comment on the item Remembering Kelly McGarry 2/1/2016 11:46 AM

This morning has been a whirlwind of emotions. Trying to fight back tears and sadness, while simultaneously laughing at some of the adventures and stories. Kelly was an amazing person and I'm fortunate enough to have known him for a number of years.

One of the Kelly memories that came up this morning was from 2011...more

Added a new video The Rise of Doom with Matt Macduff 1/28/2016 11:06 AM
C138x104

Make a deal with the Devil to show the posers who's boss? Sure, we'd sign up. Published on Jan 26, 2016: When the Devil has your back, you must be doing something right.. Big Things coming, stay tuned!

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Added reply in a thread Trail Closures San Diego County 1/26/2016 12:39 PM

This is what's left of the pond area, only "Big Pond" still stands... The old jumpline on the way out which has been flattened for months was re-flattened and left with these huge ruts. Where the little rock jump was between ... more »
Added reply in a thread Trail Closures San Diego County 1/22/2016 7:40 AM

I have more photos I can post later. Walked around early yesterday morning to see how bad it was, this time they got pretty much everything in the lower area and got the dozen further up the sand bags line and took them all out. It's ... more »
Added a comment about product review Tested: Maxxis Aggressor 1/22/2016 7:23 AM
C50_img_0045_1428943983

This was meant to be a standalone test and not necessarily a direct comparison to the Minion and HRII. But, since you guys asked, as mentioned in the article, we found cornering traction to be similar to a Minion, even under hard cornering. It's interesting GeorgeWHayduke mentioned the Maxxis catalog rating the Aggressor as slower rolling than the DHF because that wasn't our experience. It was alluded to in the review that it's not the fastest rolling tire we've ridden and not the slowest. Perhaps we could have just said it doesn't roll as fast as a Cross Mark (which we did) but it's not quite as sluggish as a DHFHRII (which we were vague about). One point we did fail to mention and will address here is the climbing traction of the tire. The Aggressor replaced a HRII rear and DHF front, with previously having the bike setup with DHF's front and rear. We found the Aggressor to hold traction better on steep punch sections quite a bit better than either of those tires out back.

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This product_review has 42 comments.

Added a product review for Maxxis Aggressor Tire 1/20/2016 1:43 PM
C138_s1600_tyre_image_aggressor_l

Tested: Maxxis Aggressor

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Review by Fred Robinson // Photos by Fred Robinson and Josh Job (action)

Maxxis has been setting the standard for high-performance mountain bike tires for years with gravity benchmarks like the Minion DHF, High Roller and more recently the DHR II and High Roller II. Having been the go-to tire for numerous World Cup DH riders, even when they were supported by competing brands, the sight of a "Sharpie'd" Maxxis wasn't uncommon before the rest of the tire brands caught up. Having laid down the yardstick in DH long ago, Maxxis set out to create another benchmark with their new tire, the Aggressor, which they claim to be the new standard in enduro tires. Maxxis debuted the Aggressor last March during the Taipei Cycle Show in their EXO configuration, then later at Eurobike in the more robust Double Down casing. We were eager to mount the new rubber to our six-inch steed and see if the tire stacks up to Maxxis' high pedigree.

Maxxis Aggressor Features

  • All-around performance
  • Dual-compound
  • EXO 60 casing
  • Available in DoubleDown (DD) 120 TPI dual-ply casing
  • Tubeless Ready (TR)
  • Sizing - 27.5 x 2.3-inch
  • Weight: 885g (EXO) // 1,050g (DD)
  • Intended conditions: Loose, loose over hard, medium
  • MSRP: $62 (EXO) // $80 (DD)

Initial Impressions

Currently, Maxxis only offers the Aggressor in a 27.5 x 2.3-inch configuration, and while that may be limiting to some, we found the volume adequate and similar to the 27.5 x 2.3-inch Minion DHF and 27.5 x 2.4-inch High Roller II the Aggressors would be replacing. Available in both Maxxis' 60TPI EXO and 120TPI DoubleDown casings, we decided to mount one of each on our bike, with the heavier DD tire in the rear. We chose to take advantage of the tires being Tubeless Ready and mounted them as such with the addition of some tire sealant. As usual, before we reached for the air-compressor we had to give it the ol' college try and see if we could mount the Aggressors up using only a floor-pump. To our surprise, despite utilizing a folding-bead, the tires quickly popped into place and sealed immediately without the use of soapy water or any other tricks of the trade. For reference, we mounted these up to our SRAM RAIL 40 wheelset, so results may vary depending on your rim options. Tire pressure was set to our preferred 31 PSI out back and 27 PSI in the front. With all else ready to go, it's time to get these tires to dirt.

On The Trail

Maxxis indicates that the Aggressor is best suited for loose, loose over hard and medium conditions. Since we primarily tested these tires in SoCal, 95% of the time the exact conditions Maxxis described were met. It was evident right away Maxxis knew where these tires would excel. Cornering traction, despite the loose over hard conditions, was excellent. Regardless our lean-angle, the tires held a consistent and predictable amount of grip. We've ridden tires in the past that really require a committed approach when it comes to the ideal lean-angle, and while the Aggressors loved being pushed hard into corners, Maxxis employed some well-placed knobs with lateral Sipes to help you out in that transitional area between the center line and the side knobs. Even if you don't fully commit to a flat corner or are riding a nicely banked berm, there's still a good amount of traction when you're stuck in that transitional zone. When you do finally get the bike leaned over, the Aggressor features some slightly modified but familiar-shaped side knobs that take over when you get low. Think a less aggressive DHF//DHR II side knob. Like the Minion's, the Aggressor features an alternating block and L-shaped pattern to the side knobs. But, instead of having a large Sipe all the way through the block-shaped knob and no Sipe on the L-shaped one, the Aggressor features a smaller, lateral Sipe on every knob. While worth noting the slight differences between the Minion and Aggressor side knobs, we didn't feel any loss or gain in cornering performance with the new layout and found the Aggressor to tackle hard cornering just as well.

So, how come the new Aggressor handles not-so-aggressive cornering so well? Maxxis took cues from the revamped DHR II center knob to side knob spacing and employed a similar layout for the Aggressor. Notice how each center knob falls between that empty space between the side knobs? As Kidwoo so keenly pointed out in his review of the DHR II, this open area keeps the the tire from having a rounded profile, allowing more dirt to get between the knobs which, in turn, translates to more traction. Good stuff.

Now that we've covered how well the Aggressor corners, let's dive into to its braking performance. Maxxis uses three different knobs to handle upright braking: (1) a blockly "V" shaped knob, (2) a knob that looks like a hybrid of the Batman logo and a Transformer (or something) with the center knob having a horizontal Sipe and the two "wings" having those vertical Sipes that help with banked-turn traction and (3) a generic-looking rectangular, blocky knob with two horizontal Sipes and vertical channel between them. What do all these knobs have in common? Big, flat horizontal edges that will help dig into the earth when you get hard on the brakes. Due to the Aggressor's well-thought-out center knob design, we found the tires to offer excellent braking traction, even in the dry and hard-pack conditions we tested the tires.

While we primarily tested the Aggressor tires in the dry, we were lucky enough to start getting some rain here in SoCal (thank you El Niño!) and put in a few days in the wet. While we never rode the tires in slop, the tires performed exactly how we’d expect in the damp, perfect earth that was our trails for a few lovely days - with increased cornering and braking traction and slightly more rolling resistance. In the few muddy spots we did roll through, we didn’t see any mud pack-up at all, but it’d be premature to comment much more about their shedding abilities as it was only a few patchy areas with poor drainage.

So how does the Aggressor roll? That was kind of a tough one for us to figure out, They didn't really feel incredibly sluggish nor did they roll extremely fast like a Cross Mark. We really wish there was more we could say about this, but the Aggressor really didn't stand-out either way, a testament to Maxxis' claim that the Aggressor offers excellent all-around performance.

Casing. We mentioned we chose to run the lighter EXO casing up front with the more durable DD casing out back. During our two months of testing we experienced no sidewall tears or punctures. Support, even under heavy cornering and sideways compressions, was ample and we didn't experience excessive tire-roll or burp them. Overall, even with poor line choice in rocky conditions, we found the casing adequate.

Long Term Durability

As stated previously, we found the casing of the Aggressor ample for aggressive SoCal riding in our EXO front and DD rear configuration. If you're riding somewhere extremely rocky (we're looking at you, Phoenix), we'd opt to run the DD casing exclusively. As far as tread wear, the Aggressors are holding up surprisingly well both front and rear. Neither tires show's significant knob deformation after upwards of 150 miles of trail riding. These tires look to be in it for the long-haul.

Things That Could Be Improved

With no glaring flaws nor any issues during our test, we're hard pressed to find a reason to fill out this section of our article. We were hoping the Aggressor's we received were going to feature these sweet tribal flaming sidewalls found on the proto tires we spotted at last year's Eurobike, just so we'd have something to moan about. But, unfortunately our Aggressor sidewalls didn't look like an overly-tan bodybuilder's tattooed arm from 1995. Oh well.

What's The Bottom Line?

Maxxis claims excellent all-around performance with the Aggressor and they delivered. We found the new Aggressor to excel in all three of its designated conditions in both cornering and braking situations. While it might not be the fastest rolling tire in the world, it's also not the slowest, and we don't think you'll miss the additional speed in the straights when it's so easily made up with great cornering traction on both flat and banked turns. Has Maxxis created a new standard in enduro? It's too soon to know, but they've done an incredible job at creating a benchmark of what a great all-around mountain bike tire should be.

For more details, visit maxxis.com.


About The Reviewer

Fred Robinson, a.k.a. "Maximus Derfimus," has been on two wheels since he was two years old. He picked up a mountain bike in 2004 and started racing downhill in 2006. He has seen moderate success racing but focuses his efforts on building, maintaining and riding his local trails. He's deceptively quick for a bigger guy and likes steep, fast trails where he can hang it off the back of the bike. As a SoCal native he mostly rides trails covered with loose, traction-less turns and sharp, immovable rocks. Besides downhill, he rides trail bikes, road, and also enjoys the occasional dirt jump session.

This product has no reviews yet

Added a product review for Maxxis Aggressor Tire 1/20/2016 1:43 PM
C138_s1600_tyre_image_aggressor_l

Tested: Maxxis Aggressor

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Review by Fred Robinson // Photos by Fred Robinson and Josh Job (action)

Maxxis has been setting the standard for high-performance mountain bike tires for years with gravity benchmarks like the Minion DHF, High Roller and more recently the DHR II and High Roller II. Having been the go-to tire for numerous World Cup DH riders, even when they were supported by competing brands, the sight of a "Sharpie'd" Maxxis wasn't uncommon before the rest of the tire brands caught up. Having laid down the yardstick in DH long ago, Maxxis set out to create another benchmark with their new tire, the Aggressor, which they claim to be the new standard in enduro tires. Maxxis debuted the Aggressor last March during the Taipei Cycle Show in their EXO configuration, then later at Eurobike in the more robust Double Down casing. We were eager to mount the new rubber to our six-inch steed and see if the tire stacks up to Maxxis' high pedigree.

Maxxis Aggressor Features

  • All-around performance
  • Dual-compound
  • EXO 60 casing
  • Available in DoubleDown (DD) 120 TPI dual-ply casing
  • Tubeless Ready (TR)
  • Sizing - 27.5 x 2.3-inch
  • Weight: 885g (EXO) // 1,050g (DD)
  • Intended conditions: Loose, loose over hard, medium
  • MSRP: $62 (EXO) // $80 (DD)

Initial Impressions

Currently, Maxxis only offers the Aggressor in a 27.5 x 2.3-inch configuration, and while that may be limiting to some, we found the volume adequate and similar to the 27.5 x 2.3-inch Minion DHF and 27.5 x 2.4-inch High Roller II the Aggressors would be replacing. Available in both Maxxis' 60TPI EXO and 120TPI DoubleDown casings, we decided to mount one of each on our bike, with the heavier DD tire in the rear. We chose to take advantage of the tires being Tubeless Ready and mounted them as such with the addition of some tire sealant. As usual, before we reached for the air-compressor we had to give it the ol' college try and see if we could mount the Aggressors up using only a floor-pump. To our surprise, despite utilizing a folding-bead, the tires quickly popped into place and sealed immediately without the use of soapy water or any other tricks of the trade. For reference, we mounted these up to our SRAM RAIL 40 wheelset, so results may vary depending on your rim options. Tire pressure was set to our preferred 31 PSI out back and 27 PSI in the front. With all else ready to go, it's time to get these tires to dirt.

On The Trail

Maxxis indicates that the Aggressor is best suited for loose, loose over hard and medium conditions. Since we primarily tested these tires in SoCal, 95% of the time the exact conditions Maxxis described were met. It was evident right away Maxxis knew where these tires would excel. Cornering traction, despite the loose over hard conditions, was excellent. Regardless our lean-angle, the tires held a consistent and predictable amount of grip. We've ridden tires in the past that really require a committed approach when it comes to the ideal lean-angle, and while the Aggressors loved being pushed hard into corners, Maxxis employed some well-placed knobs with lateral Sipes to help you out in that transitional area between the center line and the side knobs. Even if you don't fully commit to a flat corner or are riding a nicely banked berm, there's still a good amount of traction when you're stuck in that transitional zone. When you do finally get the bike leaned over, the Aggressor features some slightly modified but familiar-shaped side knobs that take over when you get low. Think a less aggressive DHF//DHR II side knob. Like the Minion's, the Aggressor features an alternating block and L-shaped pattern to the side knobs. But, instead of having a large Sipe all the way through the block-shaped knob and no Sipe on the L-shaped one, the Aggressor features a smaller, lateral Sipe on every knob. While worth noting the slight differences between the Minion and Aggressor side knobs, we didn't feel any loss or gain in cornering performance with the new layout and found the Aggressor to tackle hard cornering just as well.

So, how come the new Aggressor handles not-so-aggressive cornering so well? Maxxis took cues from the revamped DHR II center knob to side knob spacing and employed a similar layout for the Aggressor. Notice how each center knob falls between that empty space between the side knobs? As Kidwoo so keenly pointed out in his review of the DHR II, this open area keeps the the tire from having a rounded profile, allowing more dirt to get between the knobs which, in turn, translates to more traction. Good stuff.

Now that we've covered how well the Aggressor corners, let's dive into to its braking performance. Maxxis uses three different knobs to handle upright braking: (1) a blockly "V" shaped knob, (2) a knob that looks like a hybrid of the Batman logo and a Transformer (or something) with the center knob having a horizontal Sipe and the two "wings" having those vertical Sipes that help with banked-turn traction and (3) a generic-looking rectangular, blocky knob with two horizontal Sipes and vertical channel between them. What do all these knobs have in common? Big, flat horizontal edges that will help dig into the earth when you get hard on the brakes. Due to the Aggressor's well-thought-out center knob design, we found the tires to offer excellent braking traction, even in the dry and hard-pack conditions we tested the tires.

While we primarily tested the Aggressor tires in the dry, we were lucky enough to start getting some rain here in SoCal (thank you El Niño!) and put in a few days in the wet. While we never rode the tires in slop, the tires performed exactly how we’d expect in the damp, perfect earth that was our trails for a few lovely days - with increased cornering and braking traction and slightly more rolling resistance. In the few muddy spots we did roll through, we didn’t see any mud pack-up at all, but it’d be premature to comment much more about their shedding abilities as it was only a few patchy areas with poor drainage.

So how does the Aggressor roll? That was kind of a tough one for us to figure out, They didn't really feel incredibly sluggish nor did they roll extremely fast like a Cross Mark. We really wish there was more we could say about this, but the Aggressor really didn't stand-out either way, a testament to Maxxis' claim that the Aggressor offers excellent all-around performance.

Casing. We mentioned we chose to run the lighter EXO casing up front with the more durable DD casing out back. During our two months of testing we experienced no sidewall tears or punctures. Support, even under heavy cornering and sideways compressions, was ample and we didn't experience excessive tire-roll or burp them. Overall, even with poor line choice in rocky conditions, we found the casing adequate.

Long Term Durability

As stated previously, we found the casing of the Aggressor ample for aggressive SoCal riding in our EXO front and DD rear configuration. If you're riding somewhere extremely rocky (we're looking at you, Phoenix), we'd opt to run the DD casing exclusively. As far as tread wear, the Aggressors are holding up surprisingly well both front and rear. Neither tires show's significant knob deformation after upwards of 150 miles of trail riding. These tires look to be in it for the long-haul.

Things That Could Be Improved

With no glaring flaws nor any issues during our test, we're hard pressed to find a reason to fill out this section of our article. We were hoping the Aggressor's we received were going to feature these sweet tribal flaming sidewalls found on the proto tires we spotted at last year's Eurobike, just so we'd have something to moan about. But, unfortunately our Aggressor sidewalls didn't look like an overly-tan bodybuilder's tattooed arm from 1995. Oh well.

What's The Bottom Line?

Maxxis claims excellent all-around performance with the Aggressor and they delivered. We found the new Aggressor to excel in all three of its designated conditions in both cornering and braking situations. While it might not be the fastest rolling tire in the world, it's also not the slowest, and we don't think you'll miss the additional speed in the straights when it's so easily made up with great cornering traction on both flat and banked turns. Has Maxxis created a new standard in enduro? It's too soon to know, but they've done an incredible job at creating a benchmark of what a great all-around mountain bike tire should be.

For more details, visit maxxis.com.


About The Reviewer

Fred Robinson, a.k.a. "Maximus Derfimus," has been on two wheels since he was two years old. He picked up a mountain bike in 2004 and started racing downhill in 2006. He has seen moderate success racing but focuses his efforts on building, maintaining and riding his local trails. He's deceptively quick for a bigger guy and likes steep, fast trails where he can hang it off the back of the bike. As a SoCal native he mostly rides trails covered with loose, traction-less turns and sharp, immovable rocks. Besides downhill, he rides trail bikes, road, and also enjoys the occasional dirt jump session.

This product has no reviews yet

Added a product review for Maxxis Aggressor Tire 1/20/2016 1:43 PM
C138_s1600_tyre_image_aggressor_l

Tested: Maxxis Aggressor

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Review by Fred Robinson // Photos by Fred Robinson and Josh Job (action)

Maxxis has been setting the standard for high-performance mountain bike tires for years with gravity benchmarks like the Minion DHF, High Roller and more recently the DHR II and High Roller II. Having been the go-to tire for numerous World Cup DH riders, even when they were supported by competing brands, the sight of a "Sharpie'd" Maxxis wasn't uncommon before the rest of the tire brands caught up. Having laid down the yardstick in DH long ago, Maxxis set out to create another benchmark with their new tire, the Aggressor, which they claim to be the new standard in enduro tires. Maxxis debuted the Aggressor last March during the Taipei Cycle Show in their EXO configuration, then later at Eurobike in the more robust Double Down casing. We were eager to mount the new rubber to our six-inch steed and see if the tire stacks up to Maxxis' high pedigree.

Maxxis Aggressor Features

  • All-around performance
  • Dual-compound
  • EXO 60 casing
  • Available in DoubleDown (DD) 120 TPI dual-ply casing
  • Tubeless Ready (TR)
  • Sizing - 27.5 x 2.3-inch
  • Weight: 885g (EXO) // 1,050g (DD)
  • Intended conditions: Loose, loose over hard, medium
  • MSRP: $62 (EXO) // $80 (DD)

Initial Impressions

Currently, Maxxis only offers the Aggressor in a 27.5 x 2.3-inch configuration, and while that may be limiting to some, we found the volume adequate and similar to the 27.5 x 2.3-inch Minion DHF and 27.5 x 2.4-inch High Roller II the Aggressors would be replacing. Available in both Maxxis' 60TPI EXO and 120TPI DoubleDown casings, we decided to mount one of each on our bike, with the heavier DD tire in the rear. We chose to take advantage of the tires being Tubeless Ready and mounted them as such with the addition of some tire sealant. As usual, before we reached for the air-compressor we had to give it the ol' college try and see if we could mount the Aggressors up using only a floor-pump. To our surprise, despite utilizing a folding-bead, the tires quickly popped into place and sealed immediately without the use of soapy water or any other tricks of the trade. For reference, we mounted these up to our SRAM RAIL 40 wheelset, so results may vary depending on your rim options. Tire pressure was set to our preferred 31 PSI out back and 27 PSI in the front. With all else ready to go, it's time to get these tires to dirt.

On The Trail

Maxxis indicates that the Aggressor is best suited for loose, loose over hard and medium conditions. Since we primarily tested these tires in SoCal, 95% of the time the exact conditions Maxxis described were met. It was evident right away Maxxis knew where these tires would excel. Cornering traction, despite the loose over hard conditions, was excellent. Regardless our lean-angle, the tires held a consistent and predictable amount of grip. We've ridden tires in the past that really require a committed approach when it comes to the ideal lean-angle, and while the Aggressors loved being pushed hard into corners, Maxxis employed some well-placed knobs with lateral Sipes to help you out in that transitional area between the center line and the side knobs. Even if you don't fully commit to a flat corner or are riding a nicely banked berm, there's still a good amount of traction when you're stuck in that transitional zone. When you do finally get the bike leaned over, the Aggressor features some slightly modified but familiar-shaped side knobs that take over when you get low. Think a less aggressive DHF//DHR II side knob. Like the Minion's, the Aggressor features an alternating block and L-shaped pattern to the side knobs. But, instead of having a large Sipe all the way through the block-shaped knob and no Sipe on the L-shaped one, the Aggressor features a smaller, lateral Sipe on every knob. While worth noting the slight differences between the Minion and Aggressor side knobs, we didn't feel any loss or gain in cornering performance with the new layout and found the Aggressor to tackle hard cornering just as well.

So, how come the new Aggressor handles not-so-aggressive cornering so well? Maxxis took cues from the revamped DHR II center knob to side knob spacing and employed a similar layout for the Aggressor. Notice how each center knob falls between that empty space between the side knobs? As Kidwoo so keenly pointed out in his review of the DHR II, this open area keeps the the tire from having a rounded profile, allowing more dirt to get between the knobs which, in turn, translates to more traction. Good stuff.

Now that we've covered how well the Aggressor corners, let's dive into to its braking performance. Maxxis uses three different knobs to handle upright braking: (1) a blockly "V" shaped knob, (2) a knob that looks like a hybrid of the Batman logo and a Transformer (or something) with the center knob having a horizontal Sipe and the two "wings" having those vertical Sipes that help with banked-turn traction and (3) a generic-looking rectangular, blocky knob with two horizontal Sipes and vertical channel between them. What do all these knobs have in common? Big, flat horizontal edges that will help dig into the earth when you get hard on the brakes. Due to the Aggressor's well-thought-out center knob design, we found the tires to offer excellent braking traction, even in the dry and hard-pack conditions we tested the tires.

While we primarily tested the Aggressor tires in the dry, we were lucky enough to start getting some rain here in SoCal (thank you El Niño!) and put in a few days in the wet. While we never rode the tires in slop, the tires performed exactly how we’d expect in the damp, perfect earth that was our trails for a few lovely days - with increased cornering and braking traction and slightly more rolling resistance. In the few muddy spots we did roll through, we didn’t see any mud pack-up at all, but it’d be premature to comment much more about their shedding abilities as it was only a few patchy areas with poor drainage.

So how does the Aggressor roll? That was kind of a tough one for us to figure out, They didn't really feel incredibly sluggish nor did they roll extremely fast like a Cross Mark. We really wish there was more we could say about this, but the Aggressor really didn't stand-out either way, a testament to Maxxis' claim that the Aggressor offers excellent all-around performance.

Casing. We mentioned we chose to run the lighter EXO casing up front with the more durable DD casing out back. During our two months of testing we experienced no sidewall tears or punctures. Support, even under heavy cornering and sideways compressions, was ample and we didn't experience excessive tire-roll or burp them. Overall, even with poor line choice in rocky conditions, we found the casing adequate.

Long Term Durability

As stated previously, we found the casing of the Aggressor ample for aggressive SoCal riding in our EXO front and DD rear configuration. If you're riding somewhere extremely rocky (we're looking at you, Phoenix), we'd opt to run the DD casing exclusively. As far as tread wear, the Aggressors are holding up surprisingly well both front and rear. Neither tires show's significant knob deformation after upwards of 150 miles of trail riding. These tires look to be in it for the long-haul.

Things That Could Be Improved

With no glaring flaws nor any issues during our test, we're hard pressed to find a reason to fill out this section of our article. We were hoping the Aggressor's we received were going to feature these sweet tribal flaming sidewalls found on the proto tires we spotted at last year's Eurobike, just so we'd have something to moan about. But, unfortunately our Aggressor sidewalls didn't look like an overly-tan bodybuilder's tattooed arm from 1995. Oh well.

What's The Bottom Line?

Maxxis claims excellent all-around performance with the Aggressor and they delivered. We found the new Aggressor to excel in all three of its designated conditions in both cornering and braking situations. While it might not be the fastest rolling tire in the world, it's also not the slowest, and we don't think you'll miss the additional speed in the straights when it's so easily made up with great cornering traction on both flat and banked turns. Has Maxxis created a new standard in enduro? It's too soon to know, but they've done an incredible job at creating a benchmark of what a great all-around mountain bike tire should be.

For more details, visit maxxis.com.


About The Reviewer

Fred Robinson, a.k.a. "Maximus Derfimus," has been on two wheels since he was two years old. He picked up a mountain bike in 2004 and started racing downhill in 2006. He has seen moderate success racing but focuses his efforts on building, maintaining and riding his local trails. He's deceptively quick for a bigger guy and likes steep, fast trails where he can hang it off the back of the bike. As a SoCal native he mostly rides trails covered with loose, traction-less turns and sharp, immovable rocks. Besides downhill, he rides trail bikes, road, and also enjoys the occasional dirt jump session.

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