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Added a comment about news blog Racer Fatality at Enduro World Series Crested Butte, Event Canceled 8/1/2015 9:21 PM
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So heavy. Condolences go out to the riders family and friends.

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This news blog has 3 comments.

Liked a comment on the item First Ride: RockShox Lyrik RCT3 7/29/2015 6:30 AM

Nice look. I want to know how the compression damping feels compared to the Pike, if the fork uses its travel in a similar manor (spring rate curve) and how the fork does with respect to bushing bind (something all forks have but am still curious...)

Liked a comment on the item First Ride: RockShox Lyrik RCT3 7/29/2015 6:30 AM

one question, the skf seals fit on a pike or not?
if it makes it perform better why not

Liked a comment on the item Vital RAW - Lee Jackson Whacks Whistler + Norco Aurum Bike Check 7/26/2015 11:21 AM

Remember the days of Shawn Marsh and his DH bike bunny hop to manual on a picnic table? I'm old, I do.

Liked a comment on the item Vital RAW - Lee Jackson Whacks Whistler + Norco Aurum Bike Check 7/23/2015 2:10 PM

I can't even fathom a few of those gaps. Haulin!

Liked a comment on the item Vital RAW - Lee Jackson Whacks Whistler + Norco Aurum Bike Check 7/23/2015 1:29 PM

He and Remy should team up. That'd be a show.

Added a comment about photo Miranda Miller's RockShox Vivid 7/2/2015 8:12 AM
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Yah Mir. Get some special sauce in there!

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Liked a comment on the item SAM HILL IS BACK! 7/2/2015 8:09 AM

YAY!!!!

Liked a comment on the item Tested: 100% Speedcraft Glasses 6/29/2015 11:05 PM

The 80's called, they want their Factory Pilot glasses back. Kidding, I'm still rocking 90's M frames - function over form all day long.

Added a new photo album 100% with Yoann Barreli, Fanny Paquette and Quentin Emeriau 6/26/2015 11:43 PM
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Added a product review for 100% Speedcraft LL Glasses 6/26/2015 11:27 PM
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Tested: 100% Speedcraft Glasses

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

by AJ Barlas

In the world of downhill the vast majority of riders sport a pair of their favorite goggles for eye protection, whether against dust and debris, or to keep the wind out of their eyes. It's so common that more often than not we're surprised to see someone rocking a full-face helmet without a pair.

Step down to the trail bike though and eyewear flips the other way, with those rocking some protective glass tending to be the black sheep in the paddock. Goggles and the half-shell helmet have grown in popularity, but realistically goggles are far from the best tool for this application. While some of the rationale for this is no doubt the fog issue, a good chunk of why riders opt to go sans eyewear on the trail bike possibly stems from the dork factor.

100% are making moves to change that while keeping functionality of high importance. So how do their new Speedcraft glasses stack up? Dive in to find out.

Speedcraft Highlights

  • Available in Long Lens (LL) and Short Lens (SL) versions
  • Megol Rubber nose pads and temple arms
  • Enhanced Space for increased airflow
  • Temple arm scoops for a firm fit
  • Single lens shield for flawless clarity
  • Hydrophobic lens coating to repel water
  • Anti-Reflective interior lens coating
  • Wrap-Around design for reduced movement and more coverage
  • Replacement lenses with multiple tints for all light conditions
  • Two interchangeable nose pieces
  • MSRP: $175–$195 US


Initial Impressions

We received the Speedcraft early in the spring and were pretty impressed from the outset. In fact, we dug the concepts and first glances seen late in 2014, but having them in hand brought the realization of clever execution from concept to production. As with most performance eyewear, the Speedcraft is delivered in a case to protect them. It's key that your valuable eyewear be taken care of so that it can better do its job when out on the bike, and who wants to accidentally smash up a new investment such as these?

Inside the box are two pairs of lenses; an almost clear lens for darker rides in the trees or late afternoon laps, and your choice of a number of more heavily shaded and mirrored variations. The frame color and darker/mirrored lens choice is how you decide on the package you are most interested in. A synthetic stash pouch is also included, as well as two nose pieces to help semi-customize the fit to the shape of your face. All of this fits within the storage case in purposely shaped locations, keeping everything separate and secure.

The lines and colors of the Speedcraft have that classic 1980's styling, with subtle changes to pull in a more modern and aggressive look. They sit a little further from the face in an effort to increase airflow between the back of the lens and the rider's face. In addition to this extra space, the frame shape helps direct air, as does the inclusion of two vents on the lower portion of the large lens, and two more on the arms near the ear.

The clever rise across the mid-brow is intended to provide riders with a larger field of view, whether in or out of the saddle, and enables riders to see further down the trail without obstruction. The frame is also easy to snap away from the lens, making it simple to swap out lenses or accessories. Model options relate to lens size with the LL (long, or large lens) and SL (short, or small lens) speaking to the amount of vertical coverage provided.

On The Trail

From the outset, the Speedcraft has done a great job of keeping branches, dust, and general debris out of our eyes. We initially started with the darker of lenses, and while great for bright, hot days, they were a little dark for the thick canopies experienced in the PNW and Sea to Sky region. The darker lenses are manageable on the after work rip, but we generally found the clearer lens to be a better all-rounder later in the day.

Coverage with the LL lens option is great, and is as close to a goggle as we've gotten from a pair of shades. The lens wraps around the side of the face, doesn't obstruct the field of view, and provides ample protection. The rise in the middle of the upper frame actually works great to increase the field of view and is something not seen on other glasses of a similar style, mostly thanks to these being developed specifically for cycling. Clarity and distortion through all of the lens options has also been great, and the lenses do an excellent job of cutting back on glare off the face.

Ventilation is very good, though after a long haul stopping for a short rest can result in some fogging. Fogging typically starts at the upper portion and the longer the rider sits the more it will fog. This obviously depends on a number of factors, but it is worth mentioning. We're still waiting for someone to solve the fogging issue in all scenarios. Despite this, they remain clear for longer than similar glasses, and almost immediately clear up when you start moving again.

Things That Could Be Improved

The Speedcraft has been a treat to ride in, though there is still room for improvement. We've primarily been testing the glasses with the Troy Lee Designs A1 half-shell helmet and have found that the Speedcraft frame comes into contact with the helmet. This will not be the same for everyone or every helmet, but it's a possibility. It's not bad enough to bug us day in, day out, but it can cause some less than desirable pressure points. Perhaps take your helmet with you when considering purchasing a pair, to see if you have a contact issue.

We've found that the nose bridge on the LL version catches our attention from time to time, which can be mildly distracting when you're blitzing down the trail. If this is potentially going to be an issue, consider the SL which does away with this piece of the nose bridge altogether. Regardless, once the glasses had been worn a half dozen times this was rarely noticed again.

The pattern in which we most commonly saw fog appear in our test glasses has us thinking that some ventilation holes in the upper portion of the lens would be a good idea. It makes sense that the hot air getting trapped here would fog them up so considering more room, or areas for this hot air to escape, similar to that of a goggle could potentially alleviate this problem. As we already mentioned, while they fog up once stopped after a big effort, they do clear up quickly once you get moving again.

Long Term Durability

We've been really impressed with the durability and scratch-free state that the Speedcraft has remained in, even after months of testing. They've accompanied us on every trail ride that a half shell was the helmet of choice and continue to function well, while remaining as clear as the day we received them. We don't see any reason for this not to continue if proper care is taken.

Whats The Bottom Line?

100% have entered the cycling eyewear market with an instant banger. The Speedcraft has an aggressive, goggle-inspired style that steers away from some of the super nerdy looking glasses of the past while keeping it traditional in other aspects. Appearances are very subjective, but there's no denying that the functionality of the Speedcraft has it heading toward the winner's circle, and on their first attempt no less. These will remain our glasses of choice for some time, regardless of what people decide they look like on the trail. The ability to clearly see where we're going while having our eyes protected is paramount, and the Speedcraft does a great job of this.

For more on the 100% Speedcraft sunglasses, visit www.ride100percent.com.

Bonus Gallery: 31 photos of the Speedcraft up close and in action


About The Reviewer

AJ Barlas started riding as most do, bashing about dirt mounds and popping off street curbs. Not much has changed, really. These days the dirt mounds have become mountains and the street curbs, while still getting sessioned, are more often features on the trail. He began as a shop monkey racing downhill since day zero, only to go 'backwards' and start riding and racing BMX later on. He then came full circle once moving to Whistler. AJ loves riding everything from 8 hour mountain pass epics (bonking) to lap after lap in the park and 20 minute pumptrack sessions at sunset. Driven by his passion for biking and exposing people to the great equipment we ride, AJ started and maintains the Straightshot MTB blog. So long as wheels are involved, and preferably dirt (the drier and dustier the better), life is good.

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Added a comment about product review Tested: Alpinestars Bionic Neck Support Tech Carbon 6/26/2015 10:51 PM
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Unfortunately ditching the straps doesn't work for everybody, but I hear ya, I would if I could.

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Liked a comment on the item New Reynolds Wheel 6/13/2015 12:01 AM

"Didn't weigh them out?" Bullshit, of course they did. They just haven't whittled them down to 1800 yet.

Liked a bike check Santa Cruz V10 DVO 6/11/2015 1:28 PM
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Liked a bike check Santa Cruz Nomad DVO 6/10/2015 1:47 PM
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Liked a comment on the item 17 Ways To Crash Your Mountain Bike | BDS Llangollen 5/31/2015 7:02 PM

Gee almost went full hippie there.
That 3 second clip should be the commercial for Shimano's next DH brakes

Liked a comment on the item 17 Ways To Crash Your Mountain Bike | BDS Llangollen 5/31/2015 7:02 PM

damn, that is steep.

Liked a comment on the item Tested: Gravity MegaEvo Carbon Cranks 5/27/2015 5:21 PM

nice product, and seems like decent value, but they're a few years behind the game in terms of still having a fixed 104/64 bcd spider fixed in place. I guess if you're certain you'll never want less than a 30t NW chainring (or are ok to do a manual shift for big climbs - saw 34t...more

Added a product review for Gravity Gradient MegaEvo Carbon Crank 5/24/2015 12:02 AM
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Tested: Gravity MegaEvo Carbon Cranks

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Gravity have jumped in and joined a small, but growing niche of manufacturers willing to put carbon cranks on the line, and not just in a cross country package either. No, they've gone all in and produced a full carbon, hollow crank aimed at gravity riders - although not so much downhillers (unless your DH bike runs a 73mm bottom bracket). Did they do a good job, and how will the cranks stand up to on-the-trail abuse? We've been beating on a set for some time in an effort to answer these questions and more.

Gravity Gradient MegaEvo Carbon Cranks Highlights

  • Hollow carbon composite arms with UD finish
  • Low speed extruded AL7050 30mm spindle
  • Removable inner chainring spacer
  • Alloy chainring bolts
  • Optional lightweight polycarbonate bash ring
  • Protective Spider Tab (s.t.c.) for use when running as a double
  • Removable crank arm end cap protective covers
  • Fits 68mm or 73mm BB shells (plus BB30, PF30 and PF92 with optional adapter)
  • Length: 165mm, 170mm, 175mm
  • BCD: 104/64mm
  • PC/32/22, PC/36/24, 44/32/22 and single versions
  • Optional 32T, 34T, 36T, 38T, 40T, 42T FSA MegaTooth chainring options
  • Weight: 598-grams
  • MSRP: $499 USD

Initial Impressions

The finish on the Gravity MegaEvo carbon cranks is primo, complete with visuals of the composite layup thanks to a clear coat, rather than sanding and masking up the construction. Some enjoy this look, others not so much, but personally, we think they look tight. The spider is also constructed of carbon and is moulded together with the drive side crank arm to form a single, large, uniform piece.

The spindle is of the 30mm variety, which attaches to the non-drive-side crank arm via a single large retainer bolt. This results in a crank that is relatively painless to set up with regards to alignment with guides and so on. The use of the sometimes dreaded wave washer on the non-drive side helps take any play out of the system to secure the cranks in place and prevent them from moving side to side or coming loose while riding.

Gravity's "MegaEvo" BB392 spindle allows the use of 68mm or 73mm BB shells, plus BB30, PF30 and PF92 with an optional $20 adapter. Pretty rad.

Setting the cranks up was very straightforward and everything went together smoothly. A 10mm allen key tightens everything down and the use of caps over the arms of the spider result in a very clean looking interface for the chainring bolts. Also included are a set of crank arm boots, to help avoid beating the ends of the cranks to death on rocks or any other obstacles while hacking up a storm.

On The Trail

Hitting the trail the stiff construction of the cranks was noticeable, with great response through the rear wheel when putting the hammer down or pushing into the bike while attempting to snap out of corners. We tested them in the 170-mm length, single ring configuration and despite having little interest in dual ring setups, we were impressed with the compatibility on offer.

Within the first couple of rides the lack of a narrow/wide chainring rang clear, the first resulting incident leaving us with the dreaded jam up between the upper guide and crank/chainring interface. After a little cussing and getting our hands dirty, we were back on the trail, though it wasn't long before we dropped another. Lesson learned - traditional full guide for a regular chainring, no matter how well you think your drivetrain is running.

Once we swapped out the supplied standard chainring with a OneUp Narrow Wide there were zero issues for the rest of the test. Note that Gravity will add a FSA Megatooth narrow/wide chainring for an additional cost. The cranks show little sign of wear, despite some serious abuse including non-stop days in the Whistler Bike Park. The supplied crank boots did a killer job, taking the brunt of a number of miss-timed pedal strokes resulting in horrible meetings between the bike and terra-firma. At one such point we almost lost a boot, with the upper portion stretched around the pedal insert, but hanging on for dear life as the ground attempted to rip the rest of it from the crank, with little success.

The shape of the crank worked well for us, remaining out of the way of the shoe, no matter how crossed up on the pedals we got while contorting to dodge trees and get back on line. We've had issues with the outboard surface starting to wear away on many a crank in little time, and despite using no clear tape to preserve the Gravity MegaEvo they display little signs of wear to the crank arms after months of abuse.

Things That Could Be Improved

While the Gravity MegaEvo carbon has been a sturdy performer, there are a couple of things that we would like to see amended. Supplying an all-mountain crank in a single ring configuration with a narrow/wide chainring should be a no brainer in today's market, though for this crankset it comes at an additional fee. The set we received came with a regular chainring which resulted in our swapping it out early on due to lack of reliability without a full chainguide.

We also think that despite our appreciation of the craftsmanship that went into the carbon construction of the spider, it creates limitations in a rapidly progressing 1-by world. A smaller BCD (which may not be feasible within the construction constraints of this system), or a direct mount ring similar to that of other manufacturers, would be a great call and would open up the use of this crank to a wider range of people including those who run a smaller front chainring.

Long Term Durability

As far as the construction of the cranks goes, we've seen little in the way of problems during our test period. We've given them a good couple of hits into the ground, at angles similar to those that were issues for other carbon cranks in their early days. For the beating we've given these, they actually still look pretty baller and minus some dirt and scuffs to the crank boots, which is what they're for, really look like they've just been thrown on the bike.

We were a little concerned that the additional parts for the chainring bolts would just wind up being a purely aesthetic contribution at best, or actually another area for noise to begin to generate from at worst. Fortunately we've experienced no such problems in this department, despite lots of moist, followed by bone dry riding conditions and plenty of grit - conditions that commonly result in us experiencing all sorts of noises from the bike.

What's The Bottom Line?

Gravity have arrived in the carbon crank game in style. They've produced a tidy package and one that has run trouble free for the duration of this test. No creaks, squeaks or issues of any sort to report. The pricing is in line with competition at the top end of the market, although we feel the MegaEvo would offer greater value if it included a narrow/wide chainring for those not keen on running a full guide on their trail bikes. If you are looking for a lightweight crankset that includes some unique features and construction, while getting on with the job at hand, then the MegaEvo Carbon is definitely worth a look.

For more on the Gravity MegaEvo carbon cranks, visit www.ridegravity.com.


About The Reviewer

AJ Barlas started riding as most do, bashing about dirt mounds and popping off street curbs. Not much has changed, really. These days the dirt mounds have become mountains and the street curbs, while still getting sessioned, are more often features on the trail. He began as a shop monkey racing downhill since day zero, only to go 'backwards' and start riding and racing BMX later on. He then came full circle once moving to Whistler. AJ loves riding everything from eight hour mountain pass epics (bonking) to lap after lap in the park and 20 minute pumptrack sessions at sunset. Driven by his passion for biking and exposing people to the great equipment we ride, AJ started and maintains the Straightshot MTB blog. So long as wheels are involved, and preferably dirt (the drier and dustier the better), life is good.

This product has no reviews yet

Added a new video Kali Maya GoPro Mount Test 5/4/2015 12:29 AM
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