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Nickster426's Product Reviews

Added a product review for OneUp Components RAD Cage 8/19/2014 10:39 PM
C138_oneup_components_rad_cage

Tested: OneUp Components RAD Rear Derailleur Cage

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

by Nick Ducharme

Single chainring drive trains are becoming increasingly popular on the trail. With 11-speed upgrades still expensive, and the lack of proper wide-range 10-speed cassettes on the market, several manufacturers have jumped onboard the oversized replacement cassette cog bandwagon. These larger cogs take up the cassette real estate that one of your smaller cogs would usually occupy and installing one means you are typically forced to choose if you love your 15 or 17 tooth cog more. OneUp is cool enough to include a 16 tooth cassette cog with your 40/42t up-sized ring which bridges this shifting gap and provides a better solution than the typical 15 to 19, or 13 to 17 step created when you ditch the red-headed step-cog. To further improve your shifting experience OneUp now offers a new “RAD” cage that replaces the outer cage on your Shimano Shadow+ GS (medium cage) rear derailleur. The new cage relocates the upper pulley so that it can follow the contours of the cassette more closely throughout the movement range of the derailleur which allows for crisper shifting and more chain wrap in the taller gears. It also means you don't need to mess around with a longer/modified B-screw. So is it wide range 1 x 10 Nirvana?

OneUp Components RAD Cage Highlights

  • 7075-T6 Aluminum
  • Designed to improve shifting performance for Shimano GS (medium cage) Shadow+ clutch rear derailleurs
  • Improved rear derailleur tuning range to match an 11-42 cassette
  • Works with stock B-screw adjustment (no more removing washers or reversing B-screws)
  • Improves chain wrap
  • Weight: 26g
  • MSRP: $35 USD

Initial Impressions

The RAD cage is made from extra tough 7075-T6 Aluminum and is nicely anodized in what I'm sure is meant to be Vital green but they are available in black for that “sleeper” look too. The RAD cage package comes complete with the replacement axle bolt that you'll need, a card directing you to the website and a link to the YouTube video with the installation instructions and a sweet OneUp sticker. If I've learned anything from Honda Civic drivers it's that stickers make you go faster, so that's a pretty sweet freebie!

Looking at my expensive XTR derailleur and then imagining performing surgery on it made me cringe at first but the installation video put my mind at ease, and also informed me that I would need a beer, so after watching it I was much more relaxed and ready to go elbow deep in XTR Shadow+ clutch and cam guts.

Installation was indeed a snap and while the derailleur was disassembled I had some time to look at the differences between the original part and the new one. It was pretty obvious how OneUp have moved the cage's pivot location from the center of the pulley to slightly not-so. That slight movement away from concentric is all it took to get the top pulley hugging the smaller cogs on your cassette without banging into the monster 40 or 42t cog on the other end.

On The Trail

Prior to installing the RAD cage we wanted to check the function of our as-yet unmodified Shimano derailleur. With the OneUp 42t and 16t cogs installed we got rolling. The additional low gear was much appreciated on the long grinding Santa Ana mountain trails and the steep climbs of Laguna where the parts were being tested. There were some notable compromises in the set up however. OneUp's inclusion of a 16 tooth cog helped a lot with negating most of the between-gear feeling that a 4 tooth jump creates, when you feel like one gear is too hard and the next one you're spinning like mad. There's still a bit of bog from the cadence change, but not as bad as it would be without the 16t. The other issue was the B-screw tension adjustment. In order to get the upper pulley to not hit the huge 42t cog you have to do some extreme B-screw adjustment. We've heard stories of additional spacers, longer screws and/or needing to flip the B-screw around. Fortunately I just needed to bottom it out on the XTR derailleur and that gave me just enough clearance to keep the noise down in the 42t gear. Lastly, because of the extreme B-screw tension adjustment, the shifting in the smaller cogs became very, well, not Shimano-like. Cable tension had to be set up very slack in order to get the chain to drop to the next smaller cog in some kind of orderly fashion but this also meant that you need to give a little extra push beyond the typical shift point when climbing up to a larger cog. The situation was manageable, but far from ideal. Next step, perform the Add-a-RAD surgery on the RD.

Before even getting the bike out of the repair stand it was obvious that the RAD cage was doing exactly what OneUp was saying that it would. The B-screw no longer needed to be buried into the B knuckle and the pulley was certainly following the cassette cogs more closely throughout the full shift range. OK, that was me intrigued.

Once on the dirt the difference in shift performance was immediately noticed. The delay that was always there previously in the smaller cogs was almost completely gone and there was no noise in the large 42t cog that I was running either. Great success all around!

Things That Could Be Improved

It could be free?! On a more serious note, without doing extensive analysis on exact pulley movement I can't say that the shift quality can be further improved. That said, this is still OneUp's attempt at band-aiding another manufacturer's part to fit a modification that the original part was never meant to be compatible with. It's close to as-good-as the original but not 100% Shimano shift quality.

The only downside to the RAD cage is that it is an aluminum part and my XTR cage was carbon. There's about a 10 gram weight penalty for the OneUp cage vs. XTR. The XT/SLX/Deore derailleurs employ an alloy outer cage so I'm sure the weight penalty there is less. In reality, 10 grams is not going to be the difference in winning or losing however a missed-shift-to-stem-cap-cup-check will certainly cost you precious seconds during your next #Enduro.

Long Term Durability

300+ miles on the OneUp RAD cage and the 42/16 OneUp cassette upgrade cogs have not caused any significant drama for those parts. The cage itself as well as all of the surgery performed on the derailleur have all held together formidably. There has not been any interference between the aftermarket and original parts causing excessive wear. In fact, the increased chain wrap offered by the RAD cage is supposed to improve chain and cassette life (which is compromised by the addition of a larger inside cassette cog), so long term reliability is potentially improved. The durability of the RAD cage itself is good and if it even helps your other parts last longer, bonus!

What's The Bottom Line?

The ultimate testimony to how well this part works is that before I installed the RAD cage I would definitely not have raced with the larger 42t cog. Shifting was too finicky and not consistent enough to make me confident that I would get the gear I needed when I requested it. I'd rather suffer through the climbs with a 36t cog than risk my entry fee and podium shot for an easier trip to the top of the transfer stages. Now, with the RAD cage I get consistent enough shifting that I'd trust the system to keep up with my too-tired-to-think late stage panic shifts. If you are a casual rider who appreciates the anti chain drop security that a single ring system offers but aren't concerned with having the most precise shifting, then maybe you don't “need” the RAD cage but for the $35 price to play, it's frankly almost a no brainer. No matter what wide-range cog you're using, get yourself a OneUp RAD Cage. It makes all the difference.

Visit www.oneupcomponents.com for more details.


About The Reviewer

Nick Ducharme is a long time bike industry corporate monkey (most recently working as a suspension engineer/frame designer) but has since left that glorious lifestyle and started up his own MTB suspension maintenance and tuning operation in sunny Orange County, CA, Formula 4 Speed Suspension Personalization. Passing on prototype development and trips to Asia to join the elite crew that is the Vital Thrash Team. A former XC and DH racer now turned Enduro aficionado, he's the inaugural California Enduro Series expert champ shooting to retain that title for this year as well. Big miles and high speeds are more his thing than big air and high flying so his riding style is more engineer than flashy but that calculated and fearless approach has gotten results (and destroyed lots of tires). When not shredding in the hills he's elbow deep in motorcycle guts or a 350Z engine bay.

This product has 1 review.

Added a product review for Five Ten Impact VXi Clipless Shoe 6/3/2014 5:59 PM
C138_five_ten_impact_vxi_clipless_team_black

Tested: Five Ten Impact VXi Clipless Shoe

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

by Nick Ducharme

Five Ten are just about the most popular DH and trail mountain bike shoes for platform pedals. Their Mi6 Stealth Rubber (designed to help rock climbers walk up vertical surfaces, I believe) claims to hold your platform pedals like a clip in shoe/pedal system or like you holding your thunder buddy during a lightning storm. Well for those of us that appreciate actually being clipped in, Five Ten offers the Impact VXi Clipless shoe as seen on the fast feet of World Cup hero, Greg Minnaar. This newest shoe worn by the course scorching South African claims lighter weight, better fit, more protection and well, being “perfect” according to the Five Ten website. Perfection is a tough thing to come by, let's see how they stack up to the claim...

Impact VXi Clipless Highlights

  • Outsoles are Stealth Mi6 rubber with a partial dot tread for great grip and shock absorption
  • Uppers are synthetic
  • Raptor tongue
  • Built on a downhill-specific shoe last
  • Reinforced heel and tip
  • Midsoles are compression-molded EVA
  • Dual density insole
  • Laces with a single Velcro strap for a precise, snug fit
  • Weight: 431 grams (Size 9 US / 42 EUR)
  • MSRP: $180 USD

Initial Impressions

Upon first pawing the shoes I could tell they were different from any other DH clipless shoe the world has ever seen. They felt light but solid. The synthetic upper had a tough feel to it and the Mi6 outsole rubber creeping up around the toe and heel box added a menacing look, menacing to the rocks that try to rip your digits off, that is. The padded Raptor tongue isn't very thick but with EVA foam inside, it's pretty plush and the addition of a velcro closure, absent on the Impact VXi for platform pedals, is a nice touch to keep your heel restrained when tugging up on the pedals.The shoes are a bit bulky to look at but not as much as older Impact shoes and only slightly bigger than most other skate style shoes. I for one appreciate a wide toe box, so the bulk of the shoe is less of an issue than a shoe with smaller form facto and a matching smaller inside volume.

So, after bolting a fresh set of cleats on and lacing them up it was time to introduce the Impact VXi clipless shoes to the dirt. Little did we know, but we were in for some killer test conditions for a shoe designed to have better mud shedding and better drying capabilities than any older Five Ten shoe.

On The Trail

Day one with these went from chilly mountain conditions to downright nasty. When the hail started falling as we were headed back up the lift it was time to seek a bit of shelter. When it didn't seem to be letting up we braved the elements and headed down the hill. Fingers numb, snot frozen to the side of our faces (think “Dumb and Dumber” getting off the scooter in Aspen) we made it through the slop and sleet. We make mention of this to point out the impressive clean-abilty and fast drying properties of the shoe. The weight of the shoe is noticeably increased when wet, but nowhere near as much as older Five Ten models. The compressed foam and synthetic materials used in the new Impact VXi keep water absorption down, limiting weight gain and drying times by a lot. The shoes were ready to go the next day after being dragged through wet slop and then hosed off and left to air out in the sun. Pretty rad!

Shoe fit is accurate. This tester appreciated the wider toe box employed on this Five Ten model and the lace/velcro combination means there was nearly no movement inside the shoe once they're on.

After the first day at Big Bear these shoes have seen heavy duty as an everyday trail shoe and even for that use they excelled. While not the stiffest shoes out there they were stiff enough to ward off “hot spots” on all but multi hour pedaling days.

In terms of protection, while I never actually bashed a toe directly into something solid, the midsole and outer sole material that is used to form the toe and heel guards is pretty solid and definitely feels like it could save your little piggies from most impacts. Not steel-toe-boot solid but good.

Pedal to shoe interaction was great. These shoes did not need any additional spacers under the cleat, like some other shoes we've used. We like this because it puts the foot closer to the spindle. The cleat attachment area is plenty large for any cleat/pedal combination you can think of, and it's one of the longer sets of cleat slots we've ever seen, offering a lot of fore/aft adjustment and plenty of muck clearance. The Mi6 rubber grabbed hold of the little spikes on our Crank Brothers Mallet pedals but still released when we needed to perform an emergency dab or drag a foot through a corner. All in all, the Impacts provide a very secure feeling when clipped in, which can be a little unnerving unless you're used to running your cleats tight and prefer the secure fit.

For the days when the "shuttle" is your own 2 feet these are a welcome companion. The soles flex enough at the toe to be more comfortable than most other shoes that are meant to have cleats attached to them. They're not skate shoe comfortable, but that isn't what you want in your clipless MTB shoe anyway. Pushing the bike up to the top of some of our favorite runs was easy and as close to comfortable as it can be in a shoe with a metal cleat bolted to the bottom of it.

Things That Could Be Improved

Five Ten has almost earned their claim of “perfect”. Of course nothing is perfect for every situation and we can always want more of a good thing. These shoes have held up to rough and gnarly terrain and come out virtually unscathed. They are not the best shoe for long days in the saddle, but that isn't their purpose. They just may be the best DH and burly All-Mountain/Enduro clipless shoe on the market though.

Long Term Durability

After a few months of thrashing, spills and lots of long days pushing away at the pedals and hiking our way back to the top of some of Laguna's best DH trails these shoes are no worse for wear. There are no seams or threads coming loose. The Mi6 rubber, despite its stickiness, has held up great. Even the Velcro hook and loop bits are still intact and the laces have held up great as well, partially thanks to the Velcro strap holding them in place and away from the shoe-lace-hungry teeth of the chainring.

What's The Bottom Line?

It wasn't long ago that Five Ten was just about the only option for a good DH-specific flat pedal shoe, and for many, still is. With so many other companies developing great footwear, Five Ten needed to step up their game, and they did just that with the new Impact VXi clipless shoe. If you're looking for the best DH clipless shoe out there or you want a more comfortable and stylish (read, less roadie looking) shoe for everyday trail rides, look no further. They're good enough for Greg, so they certainly won't be slowing you down...

Visit www.fiveten.com for more details.


About The Reviewer

Nick Ducharme is a long-time bike industry corporate monkey (most recently working as a suspension engineer/frame designer) but has since left that glorious lifestyle and started up his own MTB suspension maintenance and tuning operation, Formula 4 Speed Suspension Personalization, in sunny Orange County, CA. Passing on prototype development and trips to Asia to join the elite crew that is the Vital Thrash Team, this former XC and DH racer now turned Enduro aficionado is the inaugural California Enduro Series expert champ shooting to retain that title for this year as well. Big miles and high speeds are more his thing than big air and high flying so his riding style is more engineer than flashy but that calculated and fearless approach has gotten results (and destroyed lots of tires). When not shredding in the hills he's elbow deep in motorcycle guts or a 350Z engine bay.

This product has 1 review.

Added a product review for 100% iTrack Gloves 5/8/2014 9:34 PM
C138_100_itrack_gloves_ride

Tested: 100% iTrack and RideFit Gloves

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Review by Nick Ducharme // Product photos by Brandon Turman

The 100% logo has been iconic and easily recognizable at motocross and supercross events for the last 30 plus years. Recently they've been launching some great product in eyewear and protective gear that continues with their story of high quality, attention to detail and maximum effort. With all of the gear overlap between between us MTB shredders and our throttle twisting cousins on the dirt, the traditionally moto products from 100% fit right in with the human-powered two-wheeled off-road crowd. Their new gloves are sure to get you thinking “How much effort do you give?”

RideFit Glove Highlights

  • Perforated single-layer palm improves comfort with reduced bunching
  • 3mm thick padded foam thumb overlay aids in reducing blisters
  • Embossed Airprene cuff offers maximum protection and breathability
  • TPR wrist closure system with hook and loop backing ensures proper fit
  • Polymesh backhand promotes airflow and wicks away excess moisture
  • Trek-Dry finger gussets enhance mobility and wick away moisture
  • Sublimated palm graphics improve grip and lever traction
  • MSRP - $27.50

iTrack Glove Highlights

  • Perforated single-layer palm improves comfort while reducing bunching
  • 3mm thick padded foam thumb overlay protects against blisters
  • Airprene cuff provides protection and breathability
  • Silicone coated application tab ensures easy slip-on
  • Polymesh backhand improves fit over knuckles and increases airflow
  • Trek-Dry finger gussets enhance mobility and wick away moisture
  • Silicon printed palm graphics improve grip and lever traction
  • Direct-inject logo completes the factory look
  • MSRP - $20 to $27.49

Initial Impressions

Out of the box both gloves look incredibly minimalist. No encumbering TPR armor on the back and no bulky gel padding on the palms. Just a solid feeling and very lightweight glove. The RideFit glove features a Velcro wrist closure to ensure a custom fit and the iTrack glove shares most of the features with the RideFit but employs a fixed stretchy Airprene cuff to secure the glove to your gangly little arms. The perforated single layer palm feels soft and thin yet somehow robust.

The fit seems accurate to typical glove sizing, if not a touch wide for the XL we tested. This is slightly more noticeable in the slip-on, iTrack, model. Certainly this is to allow an easier on-off but it also made this glove feel a tad bulky compared to some other gloves in similar size. Finger length is just right for the sizing though so take note if ordering online. Silicon “grippers” are added to the palms and lever finger(s) but have a distinct aesthetic over function look and position to them. The grippers on the RideFit gloves seem to be calling you out with the left glove stating “HOW MUCH EFFORT” and “DO YOU GIVE” printed on the right glove. That alone is a reminder/motivation to keep the tach all the way in the red when you'd rather just cruise at sub max effort.

On The Trail

All that lightweight simplicity delivers a very solid and connected feel on the bars. The soft palm offered great feedback and despite our best efforts to abuse them, they show no signs of wear after a few months of long rides and careless washes and dries. The Aiprene cuff is comfortable and neither the slip-on iTrack nor the Velcro closure RideFit glove caused any chafing at the wrists.

The seemingly superficial grippers on the palm and fingers did a great job of adding some traction in hairy situations and held up much better than a lot of other gloves with a similar feature. All of the tiny grippers survived the relentless panic brakes and white knuckle gripping that we could dish out.

Breathability is top notch so on hot days at least your hands stay comfortable. The finger gussets allow a good fit on the fingers but also mean that there are a lot of seams at the finger tips. This never translated to any discomfort but was noticeable when the gloves were slipped on.

In terms of protection, if you're looking for a heavy duty glove that'll keep your digits out of harm's way at all times, these aren't the ones. If you mostly plan to keep the shiny-side-up then these gloves offer an excellent blend of comfort, material feel, and grip.

Things That Could Be Improved

Both versions of the 100% gloves are missing true snot wiper. There is a small patch meant to prevent blisters on the thumb that can kinda be used to wipe your soaked brow but it isn't ideal as there is not enough coverage to absorb much. This thumb pad is a requirement for flanged MX grips but the lack of wiper is almost unforgivable for a trail/xc mountain bike glove.

Despite working with Nico Vouilloz , amongst other MTB athletes, on the design of the gloves they certainly tend more towards the moto side of things. This isn't a problem on lift days or if you live in fairer climates but for long days in the saddle in sunny SoCal where we tested these gloves it is a feature that is sorely missed.

Long Term Durability

After a few months of thrashing, spills and many trips to the washing machine these gloves have yet to show any signs of wear. Every seemingly superfluous gripper is still completely intact. Every stitch tight and there are only minimal “pulls” in the upper fabric from a run in with some SoCal cholla cactus. We have no concerns thus far with any manufacturing flaws or the durability of materials used.

What's The Bottom Line?

With the absence of a real wiper cloth on the thumb these aren't the best gloves for your "epic" rides. However, if you're looking for a simple, affordable, lightweight and durable glove for doing run after run at your local park, or if you dabble in dirty deeds of the throttle twisting kind and need a glove that can cover both disciplines, look no further. Add in excellent comfort and great materials that will outlast a lot of other gloves on the market and you've got a winner on your hands.

Visit www.ride100percent.com for more details.


About The Reviewer

Nick Ducharme is a long-time bike industry corporate monkey (most recently working as a suspension engineer/frame designer) but has since left that glorious lifestyle and started up his own MTB suspension maintenance and tuning operation in sunny Orange County, CA, Formula 4 Speed Suspension Personalization. Passing on prototype development and trips to Asia to join the elite crew that is the Vital Thrash Team, this former XC and DH racer now turned Enduro aficionado is the inaugural California Enduro Series expert champ shooting to retain that title for this year as well. Big miles and high speeds are more his thing than big air and high flying so his riding style is more engineer than flashy but that calculated and fearless approach has gotten results (and destroyed lots of tires). When not shredding in the hills he's elbow deep in motorcycle guts or a 350Z engine bay.

This product has 1 review.

Added a product review for 100% RideFit Gloves 5/8/2014 9:33 PM
C138_100_ridefit_gloves_slant_orange

Tested: 100% iTrack and RideFit Gloves

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Review by Nick Ducharme // Product photos by Brandon Turman

The 100% logo has been iconic and easily recognizable at motocross and supercross events for the last 30 plus years. Recently they've been launching some great product in eyewear and protective gear that continues with their story of high quality, attention to detail and maximum effort. With all of the gear overlap between between us MTB shredders and our throttle twisting cousins on the dirt, the traditionally moto products from 100% fit right in with the human-powered two-wheeled off-road crowd. Their new gloves are sure to get you thinking “How much effort do you give?”

RideFit Glove Highlights

  • Perforated single-layer palm improves comfort with reduced bunching
  • 3mm thick padded foam thumb overlay aids in reducing blisters
  • Embossed Airprene cuff offers maximum protection and breathability
  • TPR wrist closure system with hook and loop backing ensures proper fit
  • Polymesh backhand promotes airflow and wicks away excess moisture
  • Trek-Dry finger gussets enhance mobility and wick away moisture
  • Sublimated palm graphics improve grip and lever traction
  • MSRP - $27.50

iTrack Glove Highlights

  • Perforated single-layer palm improves comfort while reducing bunching
  • 3mm thick padded foam thumb overlay protects against blisters
  • Airprene cuff provides protection and breathability
  • Silicone coated application tab ensures easy slip-on
  • Polymesh backhand improves fit over knuckles and increases airflow
  • Trek-Dry finger gussets enhance mobility and wick away moisture
  • Silicon printed palm graphics improve grip and lever traction
  • Direct-inject logo completes the factory look
  • MSRP - $20 to $27.49

Initial Impressions

Out of the box both gloves look incredibly minimalist. No encumbering TPR armor on the back and no bulky gel padding on the palms. Just a solid feeling and very lightweight glove. The RideFit glove features a Velcro wrist closure to ensure a custom fit and the iTrack glove shares most of the features with the RideFit but employs a fixed stretchy Airprene cuff to secure the glove to your gangly little arms. The perforated single layer palm feels soft and thin yet somehow robust.

The fit seems accurate to typical glove sizing, if not a touch wide for the XL we tested. This is slightly more noticeable in the slip-on, iTrack, model. Certainly this is to allow an easier on-off but it also made this glove feel a tad bulky compared to some other gloves in similar size. Finger length is just right for the sizing though so take note if ordering online. Silicon “grippers” are added to the palms and lever finger(s) but have a distinct aesthetic over function look and position to them. The grippers on the RideFit gloves seem to be calling you out with the left glove stating “HOW MUCH EFFORT” and “DO YOU GIVE” printed on the right glove. That alone is a reminder/motivation to keep the tach all the way in the red when you'd rather just cruise at sub max effort.

On The Trail

All that lightweight simplicity delivers a very solid and connected feel on the bars. The soft palm offered great feedback and despite our best efforts to abuse them, they show no signs of wear after a few months of long rides and careless washes and dries. The Aiprene cuff is comfortable and neither the slip-on iTrack nor the Velcro closure RideFit glove caused any chafing at the wrists.

The seemingly superficial grippers on the palm and fingers did a great job of adding some traction in hairy situations and held up much better than a lot of other gloves with a similar feature. All of the tiny grippers survived the relentless panic brakes and white knuckle gripping that we could dish out.

Breathability is top notch so on hot days at least your hands stay comfortable. The finger gussets allow a good fit on the fingers but also mean that there are a lot of seams at the finger tips. This never translated to any discomfort but was noticeable when the gloves were slipped on.

In terms of protection, if you're looking for a heavy duty glove that'll keep your digits out of harm's way at all times, these aren't the ones. If you mostly plan to keep the shiny-side-up then these gloves offer an excellent blend of comfort, material feel, and grip.

Things That Could Be Improved

Both versions of the 100% gloves are missing true snot wiper. There is a small patch meant to prevent blisters on the thumb that can kinda be used to wipe your soaked brow but it isn't ideal as there is not enough coverage to absorb much. This thumb pad is a requirement for flanged MX grips but the lack of wiper is almost unforgivable for a trail/xc mountain bike glove.

Despite working with Nico Vouilloz , amongst other MTB athletes, on the design of the gloves they certainly tend more towards the moto side of things. This isn't a problem on lift days or if you live in fairer climates but for long days in the saddle in sunny SoCal where we tested these gloves it is a feature that is sorely missed.

Long Term Durability

After a few months of thrashing, spills and many trips to the washing machine these gloves have yet to show any signs of wear. Every seemingly superfluous gripper is still completely intact. Every stitch tight and there are only minimal “pulls” in the upper fabric from a run in with some SoCal cholla cactus. We have no concerns thus far with any manufacturing flaws or the durability of materials used.

What's The Bottom Line?

With the absence of a real wiper cloth on the thumb these aren't the best gloves for your "epic" rides. However, if you're looking for a simple, affordable, lightweight and durable glove for doing run after run at your local park, or if you dabble in dirty deeds of the throttle twisting kind and need a glove that can cover both disciplines, look no further. Add in excellent comfort and great materials that will outlast a lot of other gloves on the market and you've got a winner on your hands.

Visit www.ride100percent.com for more details.


About The Reviewer

Nick Ducharme is a long-time bike industry corporate monkey (most recently working as a suspension engineer/frame designer) but has since left that glorious lifestyle and started up his own MTB suspension maintenance and tuning operation in sunny Orange County, CA, Formula 4 Speed Suspension Personalization. Passing on prototype development and trips to Asia to join the elite crew that is the Vital Thrash Team, this former XC and DH racer now turned Enduro aficionado is the inaugural California Enduro Series expert champ shooting to retain that title for this year as well. Big miles and high speeds are more his thing than big air and high flying so his riding style is more engineer than flashy but that calculated and fearless approach has gotten results (and destroyed lots of tires). When not shredding in the hills he's elbow deep in motorcycle guts or a 350Z engine bay.

This product has 1 review.