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Added a comment about product review Tested: Xpedo Spry Pedal 9/14/2014 5:33 AM
Added a product review for Xpedo Spry Pedal 9/12/2014 12:53 PM
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Tested: Xpedo Spry Pedal

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Xpedo has been making mountain bike pedals for quite some time, and they are especially known for their more or less radical out-of-the-box designs. With the new Spry flat pedal, they look to offer one of the lighter and thinner pedals on the market at an affordable price. At just 260 grams and $79 for the pair, we were eager to put a pair to the test to see how they measure up.

Xpedo Spry Highlights

  • 260g per pair
  • Magnesium body
  • Cromo spindle
  • 2 cartridge bearings
  • 1 DU bushing
  • 28 straight pins per pair
  • Size: 106 x 100 x 11-mm
  • Colors: Gold, Black, Red, White
  • MSRP: $79

Initial Impressions

Out of the box, the obvious first thing you notice is how ridiculously light and thin these pedals feel in your hand. At 260g PER PAIR, their combined weight is close to the weight of some single aluminum pedals on the market, and even lighter than some of the plastic pedal offerings out there. At just 11-mm thin, you'll benefit from that extra bit of ground clearance as well.

The finish on the pedals appeared to be of high quality and they spun buttery smooth in my hand. The 7 pins per side looked to be reasonably sized, but not long to the point where my shins would start to quiver in fear. The pins are not installed with an allen key, but with a tiny wrench which is included in the box. Xpedo also generously throws in an extra 10 pins for good measure.

On The Trail

As with most pedals, your shoe choice is a crucial factor when it comes to grip and comfort. For this test, I used my trusted, 3-seasons-old Five Ten Freerider shoes. My feet tend to sit a little more towards the outside of pedals when I ride flats, but thanks to the generous size of the Spry's platform I never felt like my feet were hanging off the sides. The Freeriders are pretty flexible shoes, but I also didn’t notice any pressure points from the pins, nor did I notice the bulge of the axle at all.

Mainly because of the slightly rounded shape of the pins, I was able to make small foot adjustments without having to completely take my foot off the pedal, even with the Five Tens. On XC trails my feet were rarely bounced around and they never left the pedals either (aside from the odd intentional foot-out corner), but on DH rides I was wishing for a bit more grip through some of the chatter. One additional aspect to note is that the pedals have enough resistance to not spin on their own, something that the dirt jumpers would definitely appreciate.

Things That Could Be Improved

I would like to see 1 or 2 more pins on the pedals, as well as a slightly taller and thinner pin option for those DH days. The Spry is perfect for XC and dirt jumping, but I felt like I needed just a little bit more grip for when things got hairy.

Long Term Durability

The first things to go on pedals are usually the pins, especially here on the East Coast where pedal strikes are common with a low and slack bike. I haven't had that many pedal strikes, but the Sprys have held up quite well to a few hearty run-ins with rocks. The large diameter pins that Xpedo utilizes have also proven very resistant to shearing. Additionally, I appreciate the fact that since they are removed and installed with a wrench, I won’t have to dig out old dirt from an allen insert when it comes time to remove them. The bushings are still going strong, spinning as smooth as a DJ’s turntable at an Interbike afterparty. The choice of lightweight magnesium for the pedal body does come at a price, as it is softer than aluminum. Based on my experience with the Sprys so far, I'd expect them to show a few more signs of wear compared to their aluminum counterparts after a season of DHing.

What's The Bottom Line?

If you’re in the market for flat pedals for your trail bike or dirt jumper, the Spry should be on your list of options to consider. In my opinion, Xpedo really hit a good balance of comfort, grip, and durability with this pedal, and at $79 for just 260 grams per pair, they are a very affordable and cost-effective way for those looking to shed a bit of weight on their bike as well. If it's monster grip for DH you're after, probably best to keep looking.

For more information, head over to www.xpedo.com.


About The Reviewer

Justin Schroth has been riding mountain bikes for over 15 years, experiencing first hand the evolution of the industry from thumb shifters and MCU cartridge forks to carbon fiber frames and single-ring all mountain bikes. As an East Coast rider, he loves trails with a combination of jumps, technical downhills, and the occasional loose corner for some foot out action. With a Mechanical Engineering degree, Justin's instinct is to always consider how it works over how it looks. After many years of racing the Northeast Norba and Collegiate series, Justin hung up the race plate and his diploma to go behind the camera at Lucent Productions, creating mountain bike video content for several clients such as Highland Mountain Bike Park.

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Liked a comment on the item Tested: Lizard Skins Monitor 1.0 Gloves 9/11/2014 10:03 AM

comfy and sticky, i've been riding these for 6months, no complaints. its like u dont have to hold onto the bars the Monitors do all the work, i dig 'em!!

Added a product review for Lizard Skins Monitor 1.0 Gloves 8/26/2014 1:34 PM
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Tested: Lizard Skins Monitor 1.0 Gloves

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Lizard Skins looked to expand their product lineup of grips, bar tape, body armor, and frame protection with the Monitor 1.0 gloves. The aim here was to create a lightweight and minimalist glove with ample tech features without the added bulk. We grabbed a pair and hit the trails for a couple of months to let you know how they succeeded.

Lizard Skins Monitor 1.0 Highlights

  • Articulated fingers
  • Knuckle gussets
  • Seamless material integration
  • Clarino palm
  • Touch screen compatible
  • Available sizes: S-XXL
  • MSRP: $42 USD

Initial Impressions

The first thing I noticed on ride #1 with the Monitor 1.0 glove was the super supple and soft Clarino palm material. Clarino has the smooth feel of suede and the strength of leather, without the drawbacks of the real thing since it maintains its characteristics when wet or after washing. And since Clarino a tough material, Lizard Skins is able to make the palm super thin.The material along the top of your hand is equally thin and minimal which I personally enjoyed. Additional tech features such as gusseted knuckles and touch screen pads on the index fingers round out the Monitor 1.0 gloves.

On The Trail

Being someone with small hands, I really enjoyed the fact that the fingers aren’t too wide and that the material doesn't bunch up under the knuckles. The Clarino in the palm is one of thinnest and most comfortable I’ve experienced in a pair of gloves, it ALMOST feels like you’re pulling a Blenkinsop and riding gloveless. The material covering the top of your hands also breathes extremely well and I never noticed my meat paws getting sweaty even on hot & muggy summer rides. And for those that are concerned about posting your Strava times or Instagramming your ride, you’ll enjoy the touch-screen friendly index fingers.

Things That Could Be Improved

The Monitor 1.0 gloves have a Velcro wrist tab which you’ll either love or hate. I would prefer to have a slip on glove so there’s less bulk and no Velcro strap digging into the top of your wrist when your hands are bent. I found that if the tab wasn’t lined up perfectly, I could feel the exposed Velcro on my skin which is a slight annoyance. Lastly, the price point is a bit higher than most gloves on the market, and although I assume this may have something to do with the high quality palm material and the touch screen fingers, it still bears pointing out.

Long Term Durability

Despite stretching out a bit compared to the initial ride, the Monitors are still holding up quite well without any tearing or visible distress to the palm area and fingers after a few months of riding. All the seams and stitching still look new and the only real sign of wear are the missing rubber grippers on the finger tips. They wore off after a few rides, but to be honest I’ve almost never come across a glove where this doesn't happen.

What's The Bottom Line?

I really enjoy the fit, comfort, and breathability of the Monitor 1.0 gloves. My current arsenal of gloves has been relegated to storage in favor of these until they will become too worn out for riding. If Lizard Skins could drop the price a bit they would get a bump in our star-rating, as it stands now they have themselves a real contender in the glove market - but one that comes at a premium.

For more information head on over to www.lizardskins.com.


About The Reviewer

Justin Schroth has been riding mountain bikes for over 15 years, experiencing first hand the evolution of the industry from thumb shifters and MCU cartridge forks to carbon fiber frames and single-ring all mountain bikes. As an East Coast rider, he loves trails with a combination of jumps, technical downhills, and the occasional loose corner for some foot out action. With a Mechanical Engineering degree, Justin's instinct is to always consider how it works over how it looks. After many years of racing the Northeast Norba and Collegiate series, Justin hung up the race plate and his diploma to go behind the camera at Lucent Productions, creating mountain bike video content for several clients such as Highland Mountain Bike Park.

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Added a comment about product review Tested: Giro Cipher Helmet 8/11/2014 7:56 AM
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The GoPro Mount snaps in and is quickly removable!

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This product_review has 4 comments.

Added a product review for Giro Cipher Helmet 8/8/2014 10:01 AM
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Tested: Giro Cipher Helmet

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

by Justin Schroth

Giro has long been in the head-protection game in various action sports, producing some of the best technology and features available for riders today. With the Giro Remedy being a crowd favorite for many years, Giro now looks to further step up their game with the new Cipher, aimed at the DH and Enduro crowd in need of a lightweight and well-vented lid at a price point that won’t break the bank.

Giro Cipher Highlights

  • Integrated P.O.V. camera mount
  • Tool-free, bolt-on visor
  • Channeled ventilation at browline
  • Emergency removable pads
  • X-Static® anti-microbial padding
  • D-Ring buckle system
  • TuneUps™ audio speaker pockets with O-Snap™ cord management
  • Fiberglass shell with EPS liner
  • Custom injected gaskets around goggle port and neck roll
  • Vinyl Nitrile-lined chinbar
  • Fit Kit™ fit system
  • 8 vents with internal channeling
  • MSRP: $200 USD

Initial Impressions

Out of the box, the Giro Cipher looks sleek, stylish, and streamlined without giving you that bobblehead look. At 1180 grams, the helmet doesn’t weight much more than some carbon fiber helmets on the market (there's about 100-150 grams in it, depending on the model you compare it to). Although lightweight, the helmet feels solid and has impressive rubber molding details around the goggle port and bottom openings.

Giro also includes a dedicated GoPro/Contour mount that is designed to break away in a hard crash. On the topic of eating it, the helmet doesn't feature the Eject system but the cheekpads are specifically designed to be removable to help with getting your lid off safely after a serious digger.

For those who enjoy rocking out to the beat while getting their shred on, the Cipher is specifically compatible with in-helmet speakers, like the TuneUps system from Giro/Skullcandy for example. The speakers slide into specifically designated pockets in the cheekpads. Finally, the pads and liner are removable for easy washing, and treated with an antimicrobial agent to avoid you getting your dome-funk on.

On The Trail

For the first ride, I noticed the helmet was a little tight around the ears/cheeks, but after a few days of DH laps the pads broke in and the helmet became very comfortable. Snug enough to hold steady without any pressure points around my dome. Coming from a larger moto-style lid most recently, it was nice not noticing the weight of the helmet when riding. The bottom rear portion of the Cipher is low-profile which makes it a very neck-brace friendly helmet, and I never felt restricted when looking upward on the steeper stuff.

With 8 vents, including large intake vents along the brow, the helmet breathed very well even on an upper 80’s day. The large enduro-inspired goggle port not only allows for a great field of vision and an easy fit with a range of goggles, but also keeps the air flowing when you’re charging hard and mouth-breathing like a champ.

Things That Could Be Improved

Although I like the idea of a designated GoPro mount on a helmet, the break-away design that Giro went with has some play in the mount which does not provide a super stable platform - as a result it can cause shaky video. Additionally, Giro offers the Cipher in a wide range of flashy color combo options, but I would also like to see a few more subdued colorway options.

Long Term Durability

Although I haven’t had any crashes with the helmet, the construction seems solid with apparent attention to detail that you’d expect from helmets costing almost twice as much. I’ve had helmets where the manufacturer had skimped on quality visor hardware or chin-straps, but on the Cipher these look and feel solid. I expect Giro's latest to last me many seasons barring any bad crashes!

What's The Bottom Line?

The Cipher is a sweet option for those looking for a lightweight enduro/DH capable helmet that looks great, breathes well, and is neck-brace compatible. The MSRP runs $200 but I've seen it go for around $180 which is certainly a very good price for a helmet of this quality.

For more information, head to www.giro.com.


About The Reviewer

Justin Schroth has been riding mountain bikes for over 15 years, experiencing first hand the evolution of the industry from thumb shifters and MCU cartridge forks to carbon fiber frames and single-ring all mountain bikes. As an East Coast rider, he loves trails with a combination of jumps, technical downhills, and the occasional loose corner for some foot out action. With a Mechanical Engineering degree, Justin's instinct is to always consider how it works over how it looks. After many years of racing the Northeast Norba and Collegiate series, Justin hung up the race plate and his diploma to go behind the camera at Lucent Productions, creating mountain bike video content for several clients such as Highland Mountain Bike Park.

This product has 1 review

Added a new video Greg Watts Shreds Highland Mountain Bike Park 7/30/2014 8:51 AM
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Greg Watts shreds Highland Mountain Bike Park on his downhill, dirt jump, and slopestyle bike! Song: "Rock" by Dirty Penny

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Added a comment about product review Tested: Dainese Rhyolite Jacket 7/21/2014 6:57 PM
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I believe it's their own compound, similar to d3o though.

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This product_review has 15 comments.

Added a comment about product review Tested: Dainese Rhyolite Jacket 7/21/2014 6:57 PM
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If it's any help on sizing, I'm about 5'9" 165lbs with a 32" waist and a 40" chest and I'm a medium in the Rhyolite jacket.

This product_review has 15 comments.

Added a comment about product review Tested: Dainese Rhyolite Jacket 7/20/2014 1:52 PM
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Agreed. If gear like this would get more people wearing protection over not wearing any at all, then I'd say they are doing their job. So many kids at Highland rocking the tshirt and neckbrace combo but nothing else to keep their body protected.

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This product_review has 15 comments.

Added a comment about product review Tested: Dainese Rhyolite Jacket 7/20/2014 6:51 AM
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Try here? http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/us/en/dainese-rhyolite-soft-jacket-2014/rp-prod118468

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This product_review has 15 comments.

Liked a comment on the item Tested: Dainese Rhyolite Jacket 7/20/2014 7:12 AM

For people who - after reading this review - are still hesitant:
Loic Bruni uses it at every world cup (sleeves too),
probably the only top 10 guy using body armour and as you guys can see it doesn't seem to restrict him or slow him down in any way.

Added a comment about product review Tested: Dainese Rhyolite Jacket 7/20/2014 6:51 AM
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I hear ya on price. I went on the TLD site and checked out both options and I'm impressed by the price point. Trying to find specs on both of these to compare weight, but the TLD does have more material covering your body so I would assume it weighs more and is probably a bit warmer. With no zipper to get it on/off you'll be squeezing into that like a stuff Chipotle burrito and having an even more difficult time getting it off. That being said, with stuff like this is definitely something of a personal choice and I would recommend trying one on if you can to compare. There was an VERY indepth article on another mountain bike website (it has the name Pink in it) that goes into big detail on how it was constructed. I actually read it AFTER reviewing this product and and it eases a lot of my concerns about large impacts on their soft padding. The testing they do in-house is pretty impressive and they are transparent with the results which is nice to see. Quick google search will find the article, have a read if you have 5 minutes.

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This product_review has 15 comments.

Added a product review for Dainese Rhyolite Body Armor Jacket 7/10/2014 8:52 AM
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Tested: Dainese Rhyolite Jacket

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Review by Justin Schroth // Photos by Justin Schroth, Dave Smutok, and Ryan Thibault

Dainese has long been in the body armor game and carries with it a reputation for creating some of the best protective equipment on the market for those who love to point their wheels downhill or twist the throttle to the red line. When I first cut my teeth on downhill in the late 90s, it seemed like the go-to protection for pro racers was the Dainese Gladiator or Shuttle Pro full body suit, but it carried with it a pretty hefty price tag for a weekend warrior like myself. In addition to price, the biggest hurdle to overcome when convincing riders to wear body armor was the restrictive feel and over-heating that most of us encountered on a hot summer day. Dainese has looked to tackle both of these issues with the new Rhyolite Body Armor, aiming at hitting a balance between proper protection with breathability and comfort in what remains a premium offering.

Highlights

  • Back protector - Crash Absorb® memory retention material certified to EN 1621/2 Level 2
  • Elbow and shoulder protectors - Pro shape coupled with Crash Absorb® certified according to the EN 1621.1 standard.
  • Protective structures are extremely flexible and contour to the body shape
  • Removable sleeves
  • Silicon insert on the waist
  • Perforated protective structures
  • Breathable jersey
  • MSRP - $299.95 USD

Initial Impressions

Out of the box, the first thing you’ll notice is the flexibility of the Rhyolite Jacket's padding. The Crash Absorb® material used throughout is similar to the D30, in that it remains flexible to conform to the shape of your body, but then stiffens upon impact. Getting into the Rhyolite jacket was quite simple and easy. The sleeves are open in the armpit and didn't make me feel like I was trying to put on a wetsuit.

On the Trail

The jacket seemed to conform to the shape of my shoulders and chest quite easily, and felt more like a compression top instead of a turtle shell floating around my back, arms, and shoulders. The back protector is composed of two independent layers that are able to slide back and forth. Combined with the silicon band around the inside waistband, the Rhyolite jacket rarely shifted or rode up on my torso. Although there is no cutout for the rear portion of a neck brace, the pads are pretty thin and I didn’t see much of a decreased range of motion when looking up (note that this really depends on the helmet/brace combo).

One thing I enjoyed was not having a kidney belt waistband digging into my love handles as I rode, but this may be a toss up as you do lose the protection in that area with any major impact. Zip off sleeves were a VERY welcome treat on the Rhyolite jacket, especially for those trails that might not require the full elbow protection, or when looking to cool down on the way up.

Things That Could Be Improved

Although not as warm as other body armor I’ve tested, the stretch material covering the inside/outside of the Rhyolite jacket is a tight weave and ventilation could be improved a bit with open mesh material in some areas like the chest, rear, and side panels to allow for more airflow. On a low 80s day I was still pretty warm after a few hot laps at Highland Mountain Bike Park (shameless plug). I also wish the rear back protector extended down a few more inches to help cover the lower spine better. And finally, at $300, the Rhyolite jacket is near the top of the price range of similar body armor jackets.

Long Term Durability

Although I have thankfully had no all-out crashes wearing the Rhyolite body armor yet, I’ve put my shoulder and forearms into some smaller trees while riding and was not phased by the impact. All of the seams are strong and properly stitched with no loose strings and I have no doubts that true to Dainese's reputation the Rhyolite will hold up to many seasons of abuse.

What's The Bottom Line?

Compared to some of the other body armor I’ve owned over the years, this has to be of the most comfortable and least restrictive body armor jackets I’ve worn for a day of downhill - and all this without making me look like a hockey player. While not offering the full protection of a hard shell suit, this is a great middle ground for those looking for a bit more protection without sacrificing riding comfort.

Visit www.dainese.com for more information.


About The Reviewer

Justin Schroth has been riding mountain bikes for over 15 years, experiencing first hand the evolution of the industry from thumb shifters and MCU cartridge forks to carbon fiber frames and single-ring all mountain bikes. As an East Coast rider, he loves trails with a combination of jumps, technical downhills, and the occasional loose corner for some foot out action. With a Mechanical Engineering degree, Justin's instinct is to always consider how it works over how it looks. After many years of racing the Northeast Norba and Collegiate series, Justin hung up the race plate and his diploma to go behind the camera at Lucent Productions, creating mountain bike video content for several clients such as Highland Mountain Bike Park.

This product has 1 review

Added a blog post Reviewed: Pedro's Starter Kit + Burrito Wrap 6/5/2014 6:28 AM


Pedro's has been long known for their line of lubrication, cleaning, and bike tool products. Although they offer a very impressive Master Took Kit with over 60 tools, it is most likely way out of the budget and needs for someone like me that can handle simple tune-up work but still relies on a mechanic from...more

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Added a comment about product review Tested: Lizard Skins DSP Grips 5/9/2014 5:09 AM
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jumpman + sheline I hear you on all these responses, and thats what basically kept these from getting a perfect score. If they weren't so comfortable they'd be 2 or 3 star product, but the comfort makes up for this main flaw. If they could be removed easily they would be a hands-down 5 product and be on ALL my bikes since the comfort (i.e. softness and traction) is prob some of the best I've experienced. I dont think the 32.3 diameters will give you the thickness you're looking for but I urge you to find a pair mounted and see how they feel to you.

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Added a product review for Lizard Skins DSP Grip 5/5/2014 2:38 PM
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Tested: Lizard Skins DSP Grips

Rating:

The Good:

The Bad:

Overall:

Review by Justin Schroth and Joel Harwood // Photos by Justin Schroth

Lizard Skins recently applied their DuraSoft Polymer (DSP) technology to their mountain bike line, allowing them to create a grip that does not require an inner plastic sleeve or lock-rings. The result is a grip that is super lightweight with a soft feel and thin profile.
 Previously the DSP material was used to make bar tape for road bikes, touting improved durability, increased shock absorption and superior grip in all conditions. Curious to see how the DSP grip stacks up against a sea of other options, we mounted a few pairs and hit the trail.

DSP Grip Highlights


  • DSP (DuraSoft Polymer) material

  • Available in 8 colors (black, white, blue, red, pink, green, yellow, and orange)

  • Available in two thicknesses (30.3mm and 32.3mm installed diameter)

  • 130mm in length
  • Includes end plugs and double-sided Feather-Lite Lock Tape
  • Total weight: 27 and 30 grams for 30.3 and 32.3mm diameters
  • MSRP: $30

Initial Impressions

Out of the box, the first thing you'll notice is how light the grips are, coming in at nearly 1/3 of the weight of most lock-ons. Installation involves the simple process of cleaning your handlebar, applying the provided double-sided tape, spraying both the tape and inside of the grips with glass cleaner, and twisting on the grips into position and letting them dry. Here's a video overview of the process:

The DSP grips use a foam base layer to absorb vibrations, and the DuraSoft Polymer surrounds the outside area where your hands grasp the grips.

On The Trail

For someone with smaller hands, the thin profile of the 30.3mm grip proved to be a welcome comfort, even on long cross-country rides without any arm pump or hand fatigue. The thicker 32.3mm grip would likely suit those with large hands well.

Without a layer of leather and padding between palm and grip, gloveless riders might be a little pickier. After a couple of months of riding these grips, we’re happy to report that they also suited bare hands just fine.

This grip has three traits that make them worthy. First, the absence of lock-rings on the outer edge offers more comfort to those who may hold the edge of the bar, or even overlap onto the palm slightly. Second, the lock tape technology results in a palm friendly, smooth surface with no pressure points to irritate bare skin. Lastly, regardless of the smooth surface these grips seem to remain sticky with a surprisingly amount of traction whether they are wet or dry. No worries about having to hold on too tight while riding in the wet or when your palms perspire.

Although the method of using double-sided tape to install grips seemed quite strange, they surprisingly never twisted, even after a few rocky "death grip" East Coast downhill sections and a wide variety of weather in British Columbia.


Things That Could Be Improved

The installation process will leave most scratching their heads on how to remove them, especially for those who want to swap grips between bikes or need to remove grips to install or remove brake levers and shifters. It's easy to see that removal will be much tougher than simply loosening lock-on clamps, and at best will require an air compressor, more glass cleaner, and a new set of Lock Tape to remount them afterwards. For this reason it would be nice to have a few extra pieces of Lock Tape included with the grips. Worst case, seeing as they didn’t move at all while riding, you may need to use a utility knife for removal which could be tricky with carbon bars.

In addition, one of four end caps on our two pairs of test grips fell out seemingly easier than normal after buzzing a tree through a tight section.

Long Term Durability

With black gloves the grips started to darken slightly after only a handful of rides. It didn't affect the feel or grip and is only a minor cosmetic concern.

What's The Bottom Line?

The thin diameter, grip, and comfort with or without gloves make the Lizard Skins DSP Grips very enjoyable. The only downside is the inability to quickly remove them, and a cost that's equivalent to many lock-on alternatives. If you are looking for a lighter set of grips with a bit of squish and a thinner feel than anything else on the market, then the Lizard Skins DSP Grips might be right up your alley.

Visit www.lizardskins.com for more details.


About The Reviewers


Justin Schroth has been riding mountain bikes for over 15 years, experiencing first hand the evolution of the industry from thumb shifters and MCU cartridge forks to carbon fiber frames and single-ring all mountain bikes. As an East Coast rider, he loves trails with a combination of jumps, technical downhills, and the occasional loose corner for some foot out action. With a Mechanical Engineering degree, Justin's instinct is to always consider how it works over how it looks. After many years of racing the Northeast Norba and Collegiate series, Justin hung up the race plate and his diploma to go behind the camera at Lucent Productions, creating mountain bike video content for several clients such as Highland Mountain Bike Park.

Joel Harwood has been playing in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia for the last 8 years. He spends his summer months coaching DH race groms in the Whistler Bike Park, and guiding XC riders all over BC. He dabbles in all types of racing, but is happiest while blasting his trail bike down trails that include rock slabs, natural doubles, and west coast tech. On the big bike he tends to look for little transitions and manuals that allow him to keep things pointed downhill, rather than swapping from line to line. Attention to detail, time in the saddle, and an aggressive riding style make Joel a rider that demands the most from his products. Joel's ramblings can also be found at Straightshot.

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Added a comment about video The Adventure of a Lifetime: Tackling Peru's Huayhuash Range 4/29/2014 7:09 AM
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Great work all around by Joey, Sam, and Thomas!! I CANNOT imagine riding with all that gear and still having control of a bike!

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Added a comment about video Cam McCaul vs Tyler McCaul - Vital MTB's Wheel of Fortune 3/28/2014 10:30 AM
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So. Good.

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