4li2k73z Share your Vital activity on Facebook (More info)
close
Liked a comment on the item Brendan Fairclough to Race Scott Genius LT at World Cup #1? 2/12/2014 3:10 PM

I think he might he spend most his winter on it and at 180mm is really cabale

Liked a comment on the item Brendan Fairclough to Race Scott Genius LT at World Cup #1? 2/12/2014 3:10 PM

Pietermartizburg has never been a real WC level DH course in my opinion. It only makes sense to...

Liked a comment on the item How Much Money Does a Bike Mechanic Make? The Answer May Surprise You 2/11/2014 10:32 AM

Generally speaking, if you want to get paid well financially do one of three things: do a job no...

Liked a comment on the item How Much Money Does a Bike Mechanic Make? The Answer May Surprise You 2/11/2014 10:31 AM

As a former bike mechanic and I still wrench on my own bike and someone who went through graduate...

Liked a comment on the item How Much Money Does a Bike Mechanic Make? The Answer May Surprise You 2/11/2014 10:31 AM

In my 8 years as a mechanic in Oregon, I've been earning a wage lower than most of my classmates...

Liked a comment on the item How Much Money Does a Bike Mechanic Make? The Answer May Surprise You 2/11/2014 10:30 AM

I'm a mechanic in CA, and last year I made $26,400 which was just enough to cover all of my cost...

Added a comment about feature How Much Money Does a Bike Mechanic Make? The Answer May Surprise You 2/10/2014 8:23 PM
C50_1_hand_seat_grab

This economic reality is why I went to grad school and don't work as a mechanic anymore. Wages is the intersection of supply and demand, and there are a lot of pieces that go into that beyond the skill or difficulty of work performed. There definitely is more skill involved in being a mechanic than all the other jobs mentioned, but that is only a small part of the picture. Why sometimes higher skill might equal higher wages is because that difficulty creates a barrier to entry and restricts supply, not many people have the skills to be molecular engineers, but other things restrict supply also, like doing crappy work. The kind of work that janitors and fast food workers do. In the end it might be a more highly skilled job but a lot of people want to do it (like me) and that creates a huge supply. You could restrict supply by introducing some much needed certification which might also boost demand as people gain more confidence that the wrench down the street knows what he is doing, but since the skill barrier isn't that high those people will probably just learn to do it themselves. And of course the other side is demand, which is low. People that have high end bikes are probably enthusiasts and will learn to wrench for the fun of it. People with low end bikes typically fall into 2 categories in my experience. Either they aren't that invested in biking and will just ride them into the ground and buy another cheap disposable bike, a la Magna for example (why spend 100 bucks on a tune up when you get a new one for almost that), or if they are invested in their low end bike its because they are poorer, their bike is their only means of transport etc, and when i are that poor (like bike mechanic poor) you don't have the money to pay more for a bike tuneup. High supply and low demand equals low wages. If you want bike mechanics wages to go up, 1) create a barrier to entry by requiring certification and 2) stop selling cheap disposable bikes.

This feature has 62 comments.

Liked a comment on the item How Much Money Does a Bike Mechanic Make? The Answer May Surprise You 2/10/2014 8:02 PM

As an engineer I was frequently billed out to clients at $150+ per hour. What I actually took...

Liked a comment on the item How Much Money Does a Bike Mechanic Make? The Answer May Surprise You 2/10/2014 8:01 PM

Mechanics are worth their weight in gold, yes. But for someone like me who couldn't afford...

Liked a comment on the item How Much Money Does a Bike Mechanic Make? The Answer May Surprise You 2/10/2014 7:59 PM

I think most people with high-end bikes (and in theory more disposable income) tend to be...

Liked a comment on the item Cam McCaul vs Rage Against the Machine Bassist in a Dirt Jump Trick Off! 2/7/2014 10:06 PM

The instrumental was rad but was that really the guy or just cam doing those?

Liked a comment on the item 2014 Guerrilla Gravity GG/DH 2/4/2014 8:50 PM

Oh boy, SO PUMPED! Thanks for featuring my new bike VitalMTB. This bicycle is the realization of...

Liked a comment on the item FOX FREERIDE FACEOFF - Cam McCaul & Ronnie Renner - MTB vs MX in Virgin, UT 1/24/2014 11:49 AM

How do they ride so slow and still jump so high?

Added a comment about video How-To: Mountain Bike Cockpit Set Up with Art's Cyclery 1/22/2014 4:00 PM
C138x104

So almost all women that ride are midgets?

-1 1 2

This video has 21 comments.

Added a comment about video How-To: Mountain Bike Cockpit Set Up with Art's Cyclery 1/22/2014 1:22 PM
C138x104

Its crazy how the video can make fun of the changing fads in bar widths from mtbing websites while at the exact same time advocating the latest fad! It was also the only segment of cockpit setup that barely gave a reason why their recommendation made sense (and the one they gave was incorrect). Their only reason is that 740 to 780mm bars gives you enough leverage to keep the front wheel tracking through the rocks. Well don't the rocks you track through change between disciplines? With that logic an XC rider that doesn't encounter nearly as many rocks which would affect the front wheel's tracking would require much less leverage than a DH rider. Are they suggesting that entire change in leverage needed is accomplished by a 40mm range?

In any event the logic is flawed. They make the mistake of thinking longer bars = more leverage and that 740 to 780 is long enough, and that nothing else matters. But if that length doesn't work with your body, your arms and shoulders then you get less control. Go too long or too short and you can't engage your muscles to do the leveraging optimally.

Correct handle bar width is be a function of your body measures, arm length and shoulder width. Go too small and you won't have the right hand position to leverage the bar AND TOO WIDE and you'll get the same thing. Saying that EVERY bar should be between 740 and 780 is ridiculous. Your 5'5" girlfriend will not only look comical with a 740mm bar but also be less able to get all the power and leverage she needs because of the overwide hand position.

The recommendation is i think right for most men, but not women and the reason why is only partly correct. That segment needed more explanations and caveats.

0 3 3

This video has 21 comments.

Liked a comment on the item Yeti Cycles Team Change Up - Jared Graves, Richie Rude to Focus on Enduro World Series, Cam Cole Moves to New Team 1/21/2014 9:14 PM

This looks more like a middle finger to the UCI than anything else. Vote with your dollars folks....

Liked a comment on the item Yeti Cycles Team Change Up - Jared Graves, Richie Rude to Focus on Enduro World Series, Cam Cole Moves to New Team 1/21/2014 9:14 PM

My personal opinion, waste of talent for Richie Rude. This sucks balls. Good luck to the team, I...

Added a comment about product review The Finest Rotor Avid EVER Made 12/20/2013 11:55 AM
C50_1_hand_seat_grab

The hub carrier does not act as a heat sink; at least not nearly as much as a single piece rotor. Though still connected the heat transfer will never be as good as on a rotor where the braking surface and carrier are a single piece. The real advantage of the floating rotor is that the rotor does not warp when it gets hot because its floating on the carrier, NOT that it provides better heatsinking. On a traditional one piece rotor, as the metal rotor heats up the carrier which is not as hot does not expand as much as the braking surface. So the length or the braking surface is expanding while the distance from spider arm to spider arm is expanding less causing the rotor to warp into a wave pattern. This warping in turn both creates noise and reduces braking power as the position of contact between the rotor and brake pads is altered by the wave pattern. In fact one of the reasons these rotors stay truer longer is both because the aluminum carrier is more resistant to bending from impacts but also because the carrier doesn't go through so many heat cycles.

0 0 0

This product_review has 1 comment.

Liked a bike check MIDNIGHT™ (Polygon DH Prototype #03) 12/8/2013 1:12 PM
C138_midnight_03lxx
Added a comment about slideshow Inside Guerrilla Gravity's Denver Headquarters, Plus a Sneak Peek of the New Megatrail All-Mountain Bike 12/7/2013 3:09 PM
C138_thumb

The Enginerd (is this Matt of GG?), i would love to do a test ride on this bike next season when the bike parks open again. The ride always trumps all the armchair engineering, but until then that's to only way i can get to know whether or not I might like the bike. And if the design is good then there should be reasons which can be articulated to someone with someone with rudimentary understand of bikes, and they should be able to understand them (and hopefully i have a rudimentary understanding of bikes). So i'm going to lay out what i think i understand about the single pivot bike suspension design and the various pros and cons and you can tell me where i'm off the mark or what i am missing

In a single pivot sus design, the rear axle and the pivot form a radius and the axle moves along a curve that is the circumference create by that radius. They are simple and therefore more reliable, and easier to manufacture all things being equal.

The pros of a low single pivot are that
a) you can have a stiff unified rear triangle (this applies to low or high single pivots)
b) The lower the pivot the less chain growth you'll experience. Some chain growth isn't bad as it creates a small amount of pedal feedback which increases pedaling efficiency, but too much and the amount of pedal feedback makes it difficult to pedal during suspension movement or suspension resists movement as you weight the pedals. In the end its a zero sum game between pedaling efficiency (through chain growth) and active suspension. The low single pivot design emphasize active suspension over pedaling efficiency.

Cons
a) a low origin (pivot) relative to the axle has a more forward axle path which is not optimized for square bump hits
b) the lower the pivot the less chain growth = less pedaling efficiency (but again there is only so much pedaling efficiency you want to build into a bike before you are compromising suspension movement and on a DH bike pedaling efficiency its arguably the least important aspect of a suspension design, especially when there is another mechanism through which to create pedaling efficiency namely platform valving in suspension components.
c) the Internets says that single pivots (all of them) suffer from brake interaction but i haven't wrapped my head around this
so please enlighten me. I would think that designs where the caliper rotates forwards of backwards around the rear axle would create interaction and that the unified rear triangle would prevent that and reduce brake interaction but i'm sure i don't have the full picture or am thinking about it incorrectly.

Note the problems with chain growth management are not inherent to single pivot designs. Its created when the cranks are part of the front triangle of the bike, and the rear axle is not moving concentric to the cranks, and the cranks and rear axle are connected directly by the chain. This chain growth can be eliminated from the equation either by making the cranks move as part of the rear triangle or floating it between front and rear triangles (in the case of GT's independent drive) or by connecting the chain from the crank to a intermediate stage nearer to the pivot location and then connecting it from that intermediate location to the rear axle (like the Zerode design).

So really, given that GG is using a single pivot without an intermediate chain stage like zerode (is that patented?) or a floating bb like GT (which is most definitely patented), it seems like the low single pivot is the better option for GG relative to a higher pivot, and the higher pivot would offer only better square hit performance at the cost of all the stuff listed about. But why is GG going with the single pivot at all or not going for one of the designs work arounds which would allow them to have a higher pivot and better square bump performance? Do the other designs or the single pivot work arounds really add too much complexity and therefore unreliability and manufacturing difficulty or patent costs? Or what variables in the equation behind settling on a suspension design am i missing?

0 0 0

This slideshow has 20 comments.