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Added a blog post 10/27/2014 4:17 PM

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Added a comment about feature WIN BIG! Art's Cyclery Troy Lee Designs Sweepstakes 9/2/2014 11:14 AM
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Hey guys, if you want to enter the contest not through Facebook, send an email to info @ artscyclery.com with the subject 'VitalMTB TLD Contest' and include your email in the body of the message and we will manually enter into the sweepstakes.

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Added a new video How-To: Race Preparation, Bike & Gear with Art's Cyclery 7/27/2014 9:43 PM
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Our favorite sport is all about competition. From trying to pass your buddy in the middle of a rock garden to World Cup downhill racing, the desire to be faster than the rider in front of us is always present. Let’s take a look at how, and how not to, get your bike and your kit ready for race day. Begin your race prep about two weeks before the race, so you have time to break in new parts and make sure they don’t present any new problems. Start with these maintenance procedures: Give your bike a good wipe down. A careful cleaning will often reveal damage that went unnoticed before. • Check torque on all bolts • Make sure suspension pivots are moving freely and are in good working order • Install new cables/housing if more than a few months old or if shifting has been poor • Bleed brakes if necessary. • Install new brake pads if necessary and bed them in correctly. • Check drivetrain for wear, including derailleur pulleys, and install new chain if necessary • Straighten warped rotors • True and tension your wheels A few days before the race do the following • Re-check torque on all bolts, including your pedal cleats OR loctite flat pedal traction pins • Make sure your tires are trustworthy by inspecting them for wear, cuts, or leaks • Top off tubeless tire sealant level • Lube chain and check for damaged links • Check wheels for true again Don’t forget to take potential weather conditions in mind as you get your bike dialed in. If there is a possibility of wet weather, make sure you have a set of sintered metallic brake pads and a pair of mud tires on hand. The night before the big day do the following: • Lube chain • Check shifting • Wipe your bike down one more time Race Day: • Inflate tires • Relax, have fun and pin it! Now that your bike is primed and ready to take you to the podium, let’s go through what should be in your gear bag. If you don’t usually wear one, you’ll also have to decide whether or not you’ll be wearing a hydration pack. If it’s a shorter enduro race with timed sections around five to ten minutes or so, it might not be worth carrying extra parts since if you have a mechanical, your race is effectively over. For multi day races with longer stages, then making up time is a possibility and a stocked pack could be a good idea. Multiple 4X World Champion Jared Graves carries “…every spare that is easy to carry that could break, and every tool for that job…” including a derailleur, hanger, cables, spokes and nipples, duct tape, and chain lube. In order to make sure you are comfortable, fueled up, and ready to deal with any bike problems that arise, make sure you are bringing a well-stocked gear bag. Nutrition items for on the bike fuel and recovery • Gels/bars • Recovery drink Real food • If it’s a multi day event be sure to bring enough food and cooking gear to prepare it. Clothing • Depending on how trustworthy the weather forecast is, pack cycling clothes for every condition you might encounter on the bike. Bring a fresh kit for each day if you have it. A nice clean chamois will make you feel much better. And bring plenty of clean socks. • Don’t forget clothes for after the race, again paying attention to the weather forecast. You want to be as comfortable as possible at all times. • An old pair of shoes is good to have on hand just in case a buckle fails on your current shoes. • Don’t forget your helmet and sunglasses or goggles Bike and Race Specific Items • Floor pump • Basic bike tools • Chain lube and cleaning rags • Spare tubes and patch kit • Spare chain and master link • Cables • Cleat bolts • Duct tape • Zip ties • Wire cutter • Safety pins

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Added a comment about video How-To: Mountain Bike Suspension Set Up with Art's Cyclery 7/7/2014 2:04 PM
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We've updated the video to correct the sag calculation error. Thanks again for letting us know.

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Added a comment about slideshow First Look: Birzman Tools 6/30/2014 12:29 PM
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Art's Cyclery stocks Birzman tools. We have a large order on the way that includes a few tool kits. We don't have the studio kit on order but we have a slightly smaller kit and a slightly larger kit that should be in soon.

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Added a comment about video How-To: Flat Repairs, Tips and Tricks with Art's Cyclery 6/23/2014 11:26 AM
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If you have a loose fitting tire you can usually get away with starting at the valve without too much trouble as long as you push the bead all the way down into the trough of the rim. But, if you have a tight rim/tire combo, ending at the valve will help make it possible to mount the tire without tire levers, which can often pinch your tube.

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Added a comment about video How-To: Flat Repairs, Tips and Tricks with Art's Cyclery 6/20/2014 9:55 AM
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Good point on the need to check for the cause of the puncture. This should always be done anytime you aren't 100% sure that the cause of your flat was a pinch.

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Added a comment about video Ask a Mechanic: Removing Stuck Cassettes 6/20/2014 9:02 AM
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Good tip Todd. Filing down the damaged splines is an important step when installing a cassette on a damaged freehub body.

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Liked a comment on the item How-To: Flat Repairs, Tips and Tricks with Art's Cyclery 6/19/2014 5:40 PM

Always keep it Pro.

Added a new video How-To: Flat Repairs, Tips and Tricks with Art's Cyclery 6/18/2014 12:14 PM
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Video Guide :26 - Removing punctured tube 1:21 - Installing new tube 2:33 - Emergency flat fixes 3:03 - Sidewall rip repair If you ride bikes, you will get a flat. Whether a pinch flat, sidewall slice, thorn, or sliver of glass, flats are never welcome. However, if you are armed with some basic knowledge and a few tips and tricks, flats are nothing to be feared. Tube Replacement/Install When you puncture a tube or tubeless tire badly enough that it will no longer seal, a new tube is in order. Following a few key steps will ensure a fast and injury-free replacement or install. The trick is to push the tire bead down into the trough of the rim bed all the way around the circumference of the wheel. This will give you more slack on the bead to get it up and over the rim’s bead hook. Then carefully push a tire lever under one bead and slide it all the way around. If you have a loose fitting tire, you can often pull the bead off of the rim by hand. fingers instead if the fit is not too tight. You only need to pull one bead off the rim to install or replace a tube. To install the tube, first inflate it just enough to give it some shape, put the valve through the rim’s valve hole, and carefully stuff the tube under the tire. Orient the tire logo with the valve to keep it pro. You may need to deflate the tube after getting it under the tire. Then, starting opposite the valve, use your thumbs to push the tire over the rim’s sidewall, working your way up each side of the rim simultaneously back to the valve. If you start at the valve, the bead won’t be able to sit all the way down in the rim trough, making your job a lot harder. When you’ve worked to the valve, press the tire against your waist, or the ground, to hold the bead in the trough of the rim. This will give you the slack you need to push the bead up and over the edge of the rim. If possible, avoid using tire levers, since they may pinch your tube, resulting in a flat before you even get the wheel back on the bike. If you do the job right, you will rarely need levers. Tie Knot in Tube When your luck turns sour, and you accrue more punctures than you have patches or spare tubes for, it’s time to get creative. First, remove the tube and locate the puncture. Next, with a knife or sharp object cut across the damaged section of the tube. Then tie the two ends of the tube together in a tight square knot. Reinstall the tube in the tire. Stay patient since getting the tire bead back onto the rim could be difficult at first. Finally, reinflate the tube and finish your ride, which may now be a bit bumpier. Sidewall Repair Sidewall slices, often due to rock damage and pinch flats, are common causes of flats. The downfall of both tube and tubeless set-ups, sidewall slices must be repaired before continuing on your ride. Torn sidewalls must be booted in order to contain the inner tube, which will quickly puncture if allowed to bulge out of the rip. Sorry tubeless riders, you will have to install a tube in order to get home on a tire with a torn sidewall. Tires can be booted with several common materials. If you’re the prepared type, you most likely have an old piece of tire or extra-thick downhill tube in your bag for just this purpose. A few layers of duct tape, which you can keep wrapped around your CO2 cartridge or pump, makes an excellent boot. Another well-known trick is to use an empty energy gel or bar wrapper between your new tube and the tire. You can even use a bit of the residual gel to help tack the boot in place during installation. Paper currency and even leaves can be folded up to make a very effective tire boot, just be sure to choose vegetation without any sharp edges, points, or shiny three-leaf clusters.. Double-layers of stickers peeled off your frame can be used also. Our oval Art’s Cyclery stickers are worth keeping in your pack for just this reason. To install the tire boot, follow the same procedure as a standard tube replacement. After stuffing the new partially inflated tube under the tire, position the tire boot between the tube and tire under the rip. Make sure the boot is big enough to extend well around the edges of the tear in case the boot moves during installation. Carefully seat the tire bead in the rim and inflate the tube, keeping an eye on the sidewall rip to make sure the boot stays in place and keeps the tube from bulging.

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Added a new video How-To: Quieting a Creaky Bike with Art's Cyclery 5/19/2014 9:34 AM
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There you are, cruising along and feeling fit on your favorite scenic climb, the rhythm of your breathing matching your smooth and steady cadence. In this trance-like state, the world around you slips away, your existence distilled to timing pedal strokes with your inhalation and exhalation. And then, it starts. At first quiet and unnoticed, by the time it enters your consciousness, there is no way you can finish your ride until you have found it’s source. It is the dreaded creak. More creaks are caused by cranks and bottom brackets than by any other source, but the majority of creaks originate somewhere else. To narrow down the source of the creak, follow this tried and true list of quick tests. If the creak stops when you pedal out of the saddle, its source is your saddle or seat post. Pull the seat post out of the frame, thoroughly clean the post and seat tube, and apply lubricant compatible with your frame material. If this doesn’t stop the creak, remove your saddle from the seat post, clean and lightly lubricate the saddle rails, and reinstall the saddle, torquing to the appropriate specification. If the bike creaks when you compress the suspension, or while standing on the pedals without pedaling, your suspension is the problem. It is time to clean and maintain your pivots, pivot hardware, and shock bushings. Does it creak when you torque on the bars while standing in front of the bike? Then your stem or headset is likely the source. Clean, regrease, and retorque the assembly. If you have the correct tools and knowledge, knock out the headset cups to clean and regrease them before reinstalling, or have a qualified mechanic do it. If this doesn’t solve the issue on a front-end creak, your fork steerer might be the culprit. Steerer tubes sometimes creak where they are pressed into the fork crown. You can check this by putting the fork steerer in a vice and rocking the fork back and forth. If a loose steerer is causing the creak, you’ll need a new upper fork assembly. If your bike still creaks while pedaling after eliminating these problems, check the easy stuff first by re-torquing axles, derailleur hangers, chainring bolts, and suspension bolts. Housing ferrule/cable stop interfaces can also be a source of creaks so they are worth checking too. If this doesn’t work, then pull your bottom bracket. Inspect the bearings and crankset to look for damage. Clean, re-grease, and reassemble everything before torqueing it all down to the manufacturer’s torque specification. If it still creaks, rebuild your suspension components while looking for damaged bearings and fasteners; it’s probably time for a suspension service anyway. Grease and torque everything after replacing damaged or worn parts. If none of this cures your creak, check your bike for cracks. Start by looking at the welds on an alloy bike, and anywhere there are threaded inserts or reinforcing sleeves in a carbon frame, such as the bottom bracket or headset. If your search fails to turn up any cracks, you might need to just mellow out. Of course, you could be looking for cracks in the wrong place, and might want to consider getting your head examined instead.

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Art's Cyclery added a feature story The Man Behind BOS - Interview with BOS Suspension Founder, Olivier Bossard 5/1/2014 9:17 PM

Written by Daniel Slusser. Images by Sven Martin, Duncan Philpott, Joe Bowman and Daniel Slusser

Unassuming, often recoiling from media attention, Olivier Bossard prefers to do the hard work of developing suspension products that win World Cup DH titles rather than sitting down for an interview. When asked about his approach to the relationship between product development and...more

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Added a comment about video How-To: Mountain Bike Suspension Set Up with Art's Cyclery 4/17/2014 9:07 AM
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Ah, now we are getting into the more advanced nuances that mojojojoaf alluded to below. While the full scope of suspension set up is too broad for this arena, you are on the right track, but, the steeper the terrain, the more rearward your weight should be. Thus setting up your fork stiffer will result in too harsh of a ride. Pay attention to your travel indicators. If you find yourself blowing through or not getting enough travel even when your compression settings are correct, try a little less or a little more air pressure until you get it dialed for your terrain and your style of riding. Just remember to keep track of your changes. Thanks for the comments!

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Added a comment about video How-To: Mountain Bike Suspension Set Up with Art's Cyclery 4/16/2014 10:24 AM
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Hi D.Ironshirt. I'm not sure I understand the question. If you mean "smooth trail" by "flat ground," then yes, firmer suspension will provide more efficient pedaling, an acceptable trade-off when the necessity of clearing big obstacles is not present. Either increased spring rate or increased low speed compression damping will firm up your suspension. The correct choice depends on the situation.

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Added a comment about video How-To: Mountain Bike Suspension Set Up with Art's Cyclery 4/15/2014 11:43 AM
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Adam, thanks for the input, and you're correct: many people prefer to set up spring rates in the seated position, for the valid reasons you describe. We decided to present a set-up leaning toward descending and aggressive bike handling for Vital's readers.

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Added a comment about video How-To: Mountain Bike Suspension Set Up with Art's Cyclery 4/15/2014 11:39 AM
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Thanks, Mojo. We agree, suspension set-up can be a much more involved process at the higher levels. This video will give a basic understanding of the important principles and how to implement them. Thanks!

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Added a comment about video How-To: Mountain Bike Suspension Set Up with Art's Cyclery 4/15/2014 11:35 AM
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Hey Todd, thanks for paying such close attention to the video! I believe when you refer to the VIDEO portion, you are referencing the quote where I say "Now measure the uncompressed eye-to-eye shock length. Then, subtract the compressed eye-to-eye length, and you’ll have your sag." In that case, I was simply referring to the actual sag measurement, not percentage. As you noted, the formula for determining sag percentage is correct.

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Added a comment about video How-To: Wheel Truing with Art's Cyclery 3/10/2014 10:20 AM
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In general, the fewer the spokes, the harder it is to true. So, 28 spoke wheels are slightly more difficult to true than 32 spoke, and 24 is more difficult than 28. WIth respect to tensioning, the number of spokes doesn't really matter. You can tension a wheel with fewer spokes faster, but only because there are less nipples to turn.

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Liked a comment on the item How-To: Wheel Truing with Art's Cyclery 3/7/2014 2:34 PM

Nice video. I appreciated the overall guidelines, and that it was techy enough without being overwhelmingly nerdy.

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